What happens to you when you stop working out for two weeks

Haven't exercised lately? Turns out two weeks of inactivity can quickly affect your body.

New research presented at the European Congress on Obesity showed that two weeks of not exercising led to significant changes in body composition, including increases in total body fat and loss of skeletal muscle mass.

It also increases the risk of developing chronic diseases because cardio-respiratory fitness levels declined after two weeks of sedentary behavior.

Such changes can lead to chronic metabolic disease and premature mortality.

Researchers encourage people to remain physically active and avoid sitting for long periods of time.

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Health Rankings: Top 15 states
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Health Rankings: Top 15 states

15. Idaho

Overall score: 0.356

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14. Rhode Island

Overall score: 0.422

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13. New York

Overall score: 0.430

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12. Nebraska

Overall score: 0.432

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11. North Dakota

Overall score: 0.473

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10. Colorado

Overall score: 0.559

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9. New Jersey

Overall score: 0.571

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8. Utah

Overall score: 0.578

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7. Washington

Overall score: 0.582

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6. New Hampshire

Overall score: 0.696

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5. Vermont

Overall score: 0.709

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4. Minnesota

Overall score: 0.727

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3. Connecticut

Overall score: 0.747

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2. Massachusetts

Overall score: 0.760

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1. Hawaii

Overall score: 0.905

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