Frat brothers marry each other after 10 years together

These two Texas frat brothers tied the knot last month after 10 years together.

Adrian Homer, 31, and Harrison Guy, 40, initially met after Homer pledged the gay fraternity Delta Phi Upsilon and Guy became his big brother.

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"He finished all of his requirements to gain membership and he just kind of texted me to tell me he was interested," Guy told InsidEdition.com. "I gave it a shot. We went on a few dates and that was the beginning."

The theme for the couple's April 15 wedding — their ten year anniversary — was two kings. In attendance were several more of their frat brothers.

"It was just amazing," Guy said. "Our parents were there, our families were there. It was a really – just a magical day.

The pair and their fraternity brothers even hit the dance floor to do some of their known party hops and strolls.

And the couple still participates in fraternity activities together. Harrison is the officer for the fraternity's southern region and Guy is still active in the local chapter in Houston.

"We focus a lot on our scholarship, which is for black gay men," Guy said. "We do a lot of fundraising around our scholarship. We also heavily focus on HIV awareness and advocacy."

Harrison said his wedding day was surreal, as he never would have expected it.

"Adrian is a little different than me in that he's always dreamed of having a wedding," Guy said. "I didn't share that same kind of goal or objective necessarily and then with it not being legal for such a long period during our relationship, it was just kind of one of those things where when we did talk about it, it would always like, 'Well, we could go away, get married, and then come back, but it still wouldn't be legal here at home.'"

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But the idea soon became a reality for the couple.

"It was a dream and a goal, but once marriage equality actually happened, we started to kind of actualize and think about it — a little bit more real," Guy said. "That day was just — I was just overwhelmed with emotions the entire day, like from the morning all the way through just because it's something that — you kind of just tell yourself that it probably would never happen."

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