Anthony Bourdain says these are the douchiest foods you can order at a restaurant

Are you contributing to the "douche economy"? If you shell out the big bucks for overpriced dinner "specialties" like Kobe beef sliders, you very well might be, says Anthony Bourdain.

Mic caught up with the irreverent celebrity chef and TV personality on April 18 at the Wythe Hotel in Brooklyn, New York, where Bourdain was hosting the Balvenie and American Craft Council's 2017 Rare Craft Fellowship Awards. Bourdain had a bone to pick with restaurant menus that promote foods with buzzy adjectives, saying he gets a "sinking feeling" when he sees "unnecessarily tarted up" dishes like truffle fries.

"I think any time you have a giant bottle of champagne with a sparkler in it, you are at the epicenter of douche-dome," Bourdain said. "Anything involving Kobe or Wagyu — that is not a small steak — is already suspicious."

Scroll through to see which restaurant was named the No. 1 restaurant in the world:

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World's Best Restaurants 2017

50. Hof van Cleve, Flanders, Belgium

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49. Tegui, Buenos Aires, Argentina

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48. Restaurant Tim Raue, Berlin, Germany

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47. Vendome, Cologne, Germany

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46. L'Astrance, Paris, France

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45. Den, Tokyo, Japan

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44. Brae, Victoria, Australia

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43. Reale, Abruzzo, Italy

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42. Borago, Santiago, Chile

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41. Ultraviolet by Paul Pairet, Shanghai, China

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40. Cosme, New York, USA

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39. Relæ, Copenhagen, Denmark

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38. Azurmendi, Biscay, Spain

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37. Saison, San Francisco, USA

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36. Dinner by Heston Blumenthal, London, England

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35. Septime, Paris, France

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34. De Librije, Zwolle, Netherlands 

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33. Astrid y Gaston, Lima, Peru

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32. Attica, Melbourne, Australia

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31. Pavillon Ledoyen, Paris, France

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30. Arzak, San Sebastian, Spain

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29. Le Calandre, Rubano, Italy

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28. Nahm, Bangkok, Thailand

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27. The Ledbury, London, England

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26. The Clove Club, London, England,

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25. Tickets, Barcelona, Spain

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24. Amber, Hong Kong, China

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23. White Rabbit, Moscow, Russia

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22. Quintonil, Mexico City, Mexico

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21. Alinea, Chicago, USA

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20. Pujol, Mexico City, Mexico

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19. Geranium, Copenhagen, Denmark

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18. Narisawa, Tokyo, Japan

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17. Le Bernardin, New York, USA

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16. D.O.M., Sao Paulo, Brazil

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15. Piazza Duomo, Alba, Italy

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14. Restaurant André, Singapore

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13. Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athénée, Paris, France

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12. L'Arpege, Paris, France

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11. Blue Hill at Stone Barns, New York, USA

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10. Steirereck, Vienna, Austria

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9. Mugaritz, San Sebastian, Spain 

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8. Maido, Lima, Peru

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7. Gaggan, Bangkok, Thailand 

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6. Asador Etxebarri, Axpe, Spain

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5. Central, Lima, Peru

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4. Mirazur, Menton, France

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3. El Celler de Can Roca, Girona, Spain

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2. Osteria Francescana, Modena, Italy

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1. Eleven Madison Park, New York, USA

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"The presence of a Kobe slider on a menu is [...] definitely a flashing red light," he continued. Kobe meatballs sound the same alarm. But it's not just clubby bubbly and fussy meat that bug Bourdain: "When there are people with flights of beer, doing tasting notes? For me, that's the ninth circle of hell," he said.

Watch Bourdain explain why you should "leave" a restaurant if kobe sliders are on the menu at 0:26 in the video above.

So, what is it, exactly, that Bourdain finds so disturbing? Part of it is the priority given to conspicuous consumption over true quality or value.

Customers who buy into certain high-end dishes may think the foods give off an air of class — but that's exactly what you're paying for: air. Indeed, most of the foods Bourdain listed are sold with top-dollar markups because they merely imply sophistication. Your truffle fries are probably full of lies.

Here's why.

Is that Kobe, Wagyu — or "wangus"?

The problem with Kobe and Wagyu beef? "Only a sliver of the many restaurants claiming to serve it offer the real thing," as Bon Appetit reports. "Instead, many serve what's known in the trade as 'wangus,' a hybrid of domestically raised Wagyu breeds and common Angus and call it Kobe. Some don't even bother using any Wagyu breed at all."

In other words, when you order those costly Kobe beef sliders off the menu, you very well might be just paying for the name.

This fraudulence is widespread: In the book Real Food, Fake Foodand an article for Forbes, author Larry Olmsted claims "real" Kobe beef is only served at about a dozen U.S. restaurants, yet the term shows up on dozens of restaurant menus.

Kobe's cheaper derivative, Wagyu, is often used in its place. There's no real standard for descriptors like "Japanese beef," "Japanese Wagyu," "domestic Wagyu," Olmsted wrote, and that's where things get really muddy.

RELATED: The best and worst meats for you

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The 10 Best Meats And The 10 Worst Ones
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The 10 Best Meats And The 10 Worst Ones

The Best

It's important to know your health priorities when selecting the proper meat. There are meats you can enjoy that won't affect your cholesterol or send your sodium levels through the roof. Read on to learn more.

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Pork Tenderloin

While pork can definitely be considered a heavy food, lean cuts of pork can be pretty nutrient rich and even low in calories. A three ounce serving of pork tenderloin has 122 calories and three grams of fat.

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Buffalo

Buffalo (also known as bison) can be a great healthy alternative to red meat like steak or beef. The taste of buffalo is comparable to that of more common red meats and it has half as much fat and fewer calories.

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Roast Beef

If you can’t bear to give up deli meats, which are notorious for nitrates, then roast beef is your best bet. It’s leaner than most deli meats, lower in saturated fat and offers about seven grams of protein per slice.

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Chicken

Chicken can be an exceptionally lean meat and impressively low in saturated fat when consumed without the skin. Chicken is also filled with nutrients like selenium, vitamin B6 and Vitamin B3. Traditionally white meat has been lauded as the healthier part of the chicken, but while white meat is lower in calories, dark meat contains more zinc and B vitamins than white meat does. Did you know that chicken can actually be a natural anti-depressant as well?

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Ostrich

Ostrich is another great choice for those trying to eat less red meat but who still crave the taste. It’s technically poultry and actually contains half the fat of chicken with 2.8 grams in comparison with chicken’s 7.4. A three-ounce serving has 123 calories and over 24 grams of protein.

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Turkey

It’s not Thanksgiving without turkey and the good news is that you don’t even have to feel guilty about enjoying it! A four-ounce serving of white meat turkey without the skin has 158 calories and 34 grams of protein. Turkey is also filled with vitamins B3 and B6 in addition to maintaining a low saturated fat content.

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Pheasant

Pheasant is another type of bird that has a lot of nutrients and not too many calories. Enjoying this one with the skin is a bit more fattening, but at least there are a lot of minerals in the bird to make up for it.

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Lamb Shank

This meat comes from the shank half of the lamb and if it's very well trimmed it can be a reasonably healthy meat to enjoy. A lean three-ounce serving of lamb shank has about 153 calories and under six grams of fat. This size serving of lamb shank also contains about 50 percent of the daily recommended intake of zinc for women and 36 percent for men.

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Veal

Yes, veal has more cholesterol than beef. However, if you enjoy leaner cuts of veal like sirloin you'll be consuming 150 calories or less per three-ounce serving.

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Pork Chop

A boneless pork chop has about 147 calories per serving and 23 grams of protein. The sodium levels are also pretty low on this meat.

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The Worst

Try to consume these meats in moderation since their nutritional profile isn't as impressive.

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Corned Beef

Corned beef is generally made of the fattier areas of brisket, which should give you a pretty good image of its health profile. It has 16 grams of fat, 5 grams of saturated fat and 960 mg of sodium, not to mention nitrates. Savor this meat on special occasions.

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Prosciutto

Even if it seems light and thin, just a two-ounce serving of prosciutto contains over 10 grams of fat and four grams of that fat is unhealthy saturated fat. In addition to its unsavory fat content, prosciutto is also salted, which makes the sodium content a whopping 973 mg per serving when the daily recommended limit is 1500 mg. Enjoy this one sparingly.

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Ham

When eating ham spring for the leaner versions because it is a high fat food. A three-ounce serving of boneless roasted ham has 7.7 grams of fat with 2.7 grams made up of saturated fat.

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Salami

If you want to knock out 17 percent of your daily recommended sodium intake with one slice, then try salami. Of the six grams of fat in that slice, two are saturated fat. Savor this one on special occasions.

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Bacon

It's a shame that such a popular food isn't very nutritionally beneficial since it is both high in sodium and saturated fat. Try sprinkling bacon on dishes as a condiment instead, or give turkey bacon a shot.

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Bologna

This classic lunch meat is definitely one that should be enjoyed sporadically. One slice contains 300 mg of sodium and 3 grams of saturated fat.

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Hot Dogs

Hot dogs are a very common processed meat. Processed meats can contain nitrates and are frequently high in sodium.

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Mortadella

Roughly two ounces of mortadella contain 14 grams of fat and 560 mg of sodium. That's 23 percent of your daily recommended intake of sodium.

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Chicken Nuggets

This childhood staple is sadly not very healthy. Sometimes chicken nuggets contain very little chicken and the ingredients that end up in a nugget can be icky. Plus the signature breaded exterior only adds calories. Your best bet is to make your own chicken nuggets from scratch.

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Duck

Duck actually has a lot of nutrients in it, but if it's not prepared properly it becomes a very fattening meal. Try to keep the duck lean by cooking it skinless, trimming the fat and not using a lot of oil. Of the six grams of fat in a serving, there are 2.3 grams of saturated fat, so there's no need to add more.

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Beware the truffle hustle

The so-called "douche economy" isn't limited to beef, Bourdain said. Foods like truffled french fries ("what's wrong with a french fry?") and truffled mac and cheese can cause customers to fall into a similar trap. Such menu items may suggest edible opulence, but it's more likely you're being ripped off.

According to Reader's Digest, truffle oil tends to be overrated and overpriced because it's often diluted with other ingredients. "By working in one expensive ingredient in small batches (see: truffle oil, foie gras), many customers are cheated into believing they're getting a taste of highbrow fare for a relatively low price," Sheri Alzeerah wrote. "Beware: Most commercial truffle oils are created by mixing olive oil with a lab-produced chemical."

That's right: Those crispy fries are most likely drenched in artificial flavoring.

Don't let yourself feel buyer's remorse. Just get acquainted with all the foods that get the most ridiculous markup treatment and vow to never order them again. You're better than that — and you can still enjoy your favorites, the right way. Love truffle? Buy the real thing and DIY your own umami feast at home.

And if you need a little more convincing, check out Bourdain's passion (rage?) in the clip below.

Source: Mic News/YouTube

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