Study finds sleep trackers might do more harm than good

DENVER (KDVR) -- According to the national sleep foundation, sleep is essential for a person's health and well-being.

The problem is when we can't sleep.

A report published by researchers at Rush University Medical Center found people are losing sleep over tracking their sleep.

The research showed sleep trackers are causing people to lose sleep over the fear of losing sleep.

Kelly Baron, Assistant professor of Behavioral Sciences and Clinical Psychologist at Rush University Medical Center, says no one can control their sleep - not even with a sleep tracker.

"For some people for monitoring they can always take it one step too far whether it's with steps or calories or sleep some people the tracking themselves makes them take it a little too far a little overboard," she said.

See more on sleep in the U.S.:

52 PHOTOS
Percentage of adults who get 7 hours of sleep per night in each state
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Percentage of adults who get 7 hours of sleep per night in each state

Alabama: 61.2%

(Photo via Getty)

Alaska: 65%

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Arizona: 66.7%

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Arkansas: 62.6%

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California: 66.4%

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Colorado: 71.5%

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Connecticut: 64.8%

(Photo by Denis Jr. Tangney via Getty)

Delaware: 62.4%

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District of Columbia: 67.8%

(Photo by Dennis Flaherty via Getty)

Florida: 64.2%

(Photo by Alexandros Voutsas via Alamy)

Georgia: 61.3%

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Hawaii: 56.1%

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Idaho: 69.4%

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Illinois: 65.6%

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Indiana: 61.5%

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Iowa: 69%

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Kansas: 69.1%

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Kentucky: 60.3%

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Louisiana: 63.7%

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Maine: 67.1%

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Maryland: 61.1%

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Massachusetts: 65.5%

(Photo by Richard Cavalleri via Shutterstock)

Michigan: 61.3%

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Minnesota: 70.8%

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Mississippi: 63%

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Missouri: 66%

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Montana: 69.3%

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Nebraska: 69.6%

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Nevada: 63.8%

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New Hampshire: 67.5%

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New Jersey: 62.8%

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New Mexico: 68%

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New York: 61.6%

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North Carolina: 67.6%

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North Dakota: 68.2%

(Photo via Alamy)

Ohio: 62.1%

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Oklahoma: 64.3%

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Oregon: 68.3%

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Pennsylvania: 62.5%

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Rhode Island: 63.3%

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South Carolina: 61.5%

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South Dakota: 71.6%

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Tennessee: 6.29%

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Texas: 67%

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Utah: 69.2%

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Vermont: 69%

(Photo by Denis Jr. Tangney via Getty)

Virginia: 64%

(Photo via Getty)

Washington: 68.2%

(Photo via Getty)

West Virginia: 61.6%

(Photo via Alamy)

Wisconsin: 67.8%

(Photo by Rudolf Balasko via Getty)

Wyoming: 68.7%

(Photo by Christopher Jackson via Shutterstock)

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She says paying attention to your health generally is a good thing.

However, Baron claims technology itself is not going to change your behavior.

Doctors say you should monitor how you feel.

If you feel tired, you should add more time in bed
.
Being fixated on a number won't help you in the long run because sleep can't be perfect every single day.

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