You might want to read this if you've been rinsing your nose with neti pots

As we transition away from winter and into spring, allergy-ridden people will wake up to congested noses, runny eyes and persistent sneezing. For the many who are plagued by heavy allergies, this onset is as inconvenient as it is annoying.

Not to mention, allergies and flu season does not bode well.

One of our favorite go-to products is the neti pot, which helps relieve congestion and sinus infections. If you didn't know, the neti pot looks like a teacup. Users fill the pot with saline solution and water, and over a sink, flush out their nasal passages. The solution goes in one nostril and out the other.

However, it seems users should be very cautious when using a neti pot. The CDC has reported cases of "Naegleria fowleri" -- a brain eating amoeba -- because many people are choosing to "irrigate their sinuses" with tap water.

Tap water is usually safe to drink because bacteria and amoeba can be killed by stomach acid . However, " these organisms can stay alive in nasal passages and cause potentially serious infections," reports the FDA. Sometimes, these infections can be fatal.

In light of these findings, the FDA is calling for safer practice with the neti pot. That means using distilled, sterile or boiled water, as well as properly cleaning the product.

Scroll through to see surprising sources of vitamin C:

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10 Surprising Sources of Vitamin C
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10 Surprising Sources of Vitamin C

One large orange, or an eight-ounce glass of orange juice, contains about 100 milligrams of vitamin C—that’s 130 percent of the daily recommended intake for women over 18. Whether you have trouble tolerating the acidity of citrus or just can’t stomach the thought of chugging another glass of OJ, here are some other tasty options that offer as much C—or more.

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Red Pepper

One sweet red pepper: 152 milligrams of vitamin C (203 percent daily value)

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Kale

One cup of raw kale: 80 milligrams of vitamin C (107 percent daily value)

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Strawberries

One cup of strawberries: 97.6 milligrams of vitamin C (130 percent daily value)

Bonus! The same amount of frozen strawberries has 105.6 milligrams of C.

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Broccoli

One cup of cooked broccoli: 101 milligrams of vitamin C (135 percent daily value)

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Potatoes

One large red potato or sweet potato: 36 milligrams of vitamin C (48 percent daily value)

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Brussels Sprouts

One Brussels sprout: 13 milligrams of vitamin C (17 percent daily value)

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Papaya

One papaya: 185 milligrams of vitamin C (247 percent daily value)

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Coffee

One eight-ounce mug of Green Mountain Coffee’s new Antioxidant Blend K-Cups: 6 milligrams of added vitamin C (8 percent daily value)

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Cabbage

One cup of cooked kohlrabi: 89 milligrams of vitamin C (119 percent daily value)

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Kiwi

Two medium kiwis: 141 milligrams of vitamin C (188 percent daily value)

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