Chewing gum linked to stomach problems

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By Sean Dowling, Buzz60

If you get a lot of stomach aches, the culprit is likely right in your purse or front pocket.

A food additive found in chewing gum may mess up your digestive cell structure and function, which translates to stomach problems.

Specifically, the additive messes with the ability of small intestine cells to both absorb the nutrients you need and block bacteria you don't.

RELATED: Gum wall you have to see to believe

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Seattle Gum Wall
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Seattle Gum Wall
USA, Washington State, Seattle, Post Alley, Near Pike Place Market, Market Theater, Detail Of Colorful Gum Wall. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
USA, Washington State, Seattle, Post Alley, Near Pike Place Market, Market Theater, Detail Of Colorful Gum Wall. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
USA, Washington State, Seattle, Post Alley, Near Pike Place Market, Market Theater, Colorful Gum Wall. (Photo by Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images)
 A general view of the Pike Place Market wall in Seattle, Washington. Containing an estimated one million pieces of chewed gum, the Pike Place Market wall in Seattle is one of the world's most unusual as well as unhygienic tourist attractions. Taking second place in a survey conducted by TripAdvisor.com of the 'World's Germiest Attractions', the 50 foot long wall of gum has even inspired a scene in the Hollywood film, Love Happens, staring Jennifer Aniston. Beaten only by Ireland's famous Blarney Stone, which visitors kiss, the Seattle local landmark has slowly accumulated pieces of chewed gum since 1999. Now inches thick, brightly coloured messages adorn the wall as well as small art works made from peoples left over bubble or chewing gum. (Photo by Jamison Johnson / Barcroft USA / Getty Images)
A general view of the Pike Place Market wall in Seattle, Washington. Containing an estimated one million pieces of chewed gum, the Pike Place Market wall in Seattle is one of the world's most unusual as well as unhygienic tourist attractions. Taking second place in a survey conducted by TripAdvisor.com of the 'World's Germiest Attractions', the 50 foot long wall of gum has even inspired a scene in the Hollywood film, Love Happens, staring Jennifer Aniston. Beaten only by Ireland's famous Blarney Stone, which visitors kiss, the Seattle local landmark has slowly accumulated pieces of chewed gum since 1999. Now inches thick, brightly coloured messages adorn the wall as well as small art works made from peoples left over bubble or chewing gum. (Photo by Jamison Johnson / Barcroft USA / Getty Images)
A general view of the Pike Place Market wall in Seattle, Washington. Containing an estimated one million pieces of chewed gum, the Pike Place Market wall in Seattle is one of the world's most unusual as well as unhygienic tourist attractions. Taking second place in a survey conducted by TripAdvisor.com of the 'World's Germiest Attractions', the 50 foot long wall of gum has even inspired a scene in the Hollywood film, Love Happens, staring Jennifer Aniston. Beaten only by Ireland's famous Blarney Stone, which visitors kiss, the Seattle local landmark has slowly accumulated pieces of chewed gum since 1999. Now inches thick, brightly coloured messages adorn the wall as well as small art works made from peoples left over bubble or chewing gum. (Photo by Jamison Johnson / Barcroft USA / Getty Images)
A general view of the Pike Place Market wall in Seattle, Washington. Containing an estimated one million pieces of chewed gum, the Pike Place Market wall in Seattle is one of the world's most unusual as well as unhygienic tourist attractions. Taking second place in a survey conducted by TripAdvisor.com of the 'World's Germiest Attractions', the 50 foot long wall of gum has even inspired a scene in the Hollywood film, Love Happens, staring Jennifer Aniston. Beaten only by Ireland's famous Blarney Stone, which visitors kiss, the Seattle local landmark has slowly accumulated pieces of chewed gum since 1999. Now inches thick, brightly coloured messages adorn the wall as well as small art works made from peoples left over bubble or chewing gum. (Photo by Jamison Johnson / Barcroft USA / Getty Images)
Seattle Grunge Wedding. (Photo by Gregory Adams via Getty Images)
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It's also tied to a slower metabolism, according to a new study by researchers out of Binghamton University in New York.

Keep in mind, that's after chronic exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide.

However, it's not just gum. Apparently titanium dioxide is in a lot of the food we eat every day such as candy, chocolate, mayonnaise, bread and even toothpaste.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration say it's safe, as do the researchers from Binghamton, but the study suggests chronic exposure may lead to more inflammation.

Inflammation is linked to cancer and heart disease, according to Fox News.

Researchers didn't perform the study on humans, but instead tested on a small intestinal cell culture. Sure enough, nutrients like iron, zinc and fatty acids were harder to absorb.

Since the food additive is nearly unavoidable, one thing you can do is ditch processed foods and toss your gum.

Sorry to burst your bubble!

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