Study finds eating less may slow down aging

There is no shortage of products that make people look younger, but solutions to slowing aging at a cellular level have been a bit more elusive.

Researchers led by John Price of Brigham Young University may have found a very simple fix – just eat less.

Thus far the method has proven rather successful in mice.

According to the team, it comes down to ribosomes, the cellular components that make protein.

However, the more time they spend producing, the less time they have for self-repair.

A damaged, sub-par ribosome simply can't perform at optimal levels, and, ultimately, both the cells and the functioning of the body will suffer.

In experiments conducted on mice, the researchers learned that cutting back on calories gives the ribosome the regenerative time it so desperately needs.

Of the 2 test rodent groups, one got to eat whatever they wanted while the other was fed a calorie-conscious yet nutrient-rich diet.

Later analysis revealed the mice that had consumed less were doing a far better job at beating back the ravages of time.

Said Price, "The calorie-restricted mice are more energetic and suffered fewer diseases...because they're better at maintaining their bodies, they're younger for longer as well."

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A daily cup of coffee will protect your skin from the ravages of the sun by at least 5% (and who stops at just one? A Venti increases that positive effect by 30%). The antioxidants in your java help protect your skin from cellular damage.

Fruits and veggies, especially the orange and dark green ones, respectively, are also rich in antioxidants -- throw a tangerine and a handful of kale into your morning shake to set yourself up for success.

Vitamin C is another key component to a healthy, balanced complexion. Not only does it nourish your skin, it’s also a key to collagen production. Base your breakfast on delicious produce that’s bursting with the stuff: mango, pineapple, kiwi, cantaloupe, papaya and strawberries are all C staples.

The next natural supplement to add to your list is vitamin E -- also rich in antioxidants, this nutrient’s especially important to the growth of new cells. It promotes circulation, and vitamin E oil is used to help heal everything from sunburn to scars. A handful of nuts is a great source of E, as is an avocado on your salad.   

To give your skin a more even tone, reduce dry flakes and increase elasticity, make sure you’re getting selenium in your diet. Selenium comes in many forms; seafood fans should be covered by tuna, tilapia and lobster, whereas vegetarians should reach for Brazil nuts and cottage cheese.

Our next menu-must packs a punch by building and maintaining collagen, which keeps your skin firm, and is key to skin renewal, which will keep you looking fresh. Zinc to the rescue! Top up your tank with lean red meat and starchy beans (like edamame and lentils).

Though the skin takes center stage when we think of anti-aging treatments, nothing will betray your years like a stained smile. Keep your pearly whites that way with a glass of natural cranberry juice -- its flavonoids prevent yellowing, plaque and tooth decay.  

A shiny head of healthy hair can also shed years off your look -- and vitamin A’s the key. Carrots are a fantastic source of both A and beta-carotene, which your body processes into retinol (and your skin will also benefit from tremendously).

Tomatoes are full of a nutrient called lycopene, and studies have proven that skin with high levels of lycopene is smoother and more resistant to the sun’s rays. To get the most out of your tomato, cook it first -- sauces and pastes (and even ketchup) are better sources of lycopene than the stuff off the vine.

Topical treatments aside, you can tackle acne and eczema with just a half a cup of wheat germ in your daily diet. Add it to your smoothies and sprinkle it over salads and you’ll reap the benefits while barely noticing it’s presence.  

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