Stunning chapel located hundreds of feet below ground is made entirely out of salt

A 700-year-old mine probably doesn't conjure up images of health and wellness, but it should.

Deep inside the twisting tunnels of a 13th-century mine near Krakow, Poland, visitors will find chandeliers, statues and even a cathedral made entirely out of salt.

But perhaps most surprising is the existence of a full-fledged spa.

The Wieliczka Salt Mine, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is known for its healing properties thanks to a unique microclimate that exists deep below the earth.

Beginning in the 19th century, underground mining chambers started being converted into a health resort. The main calling card for this unusual destination is its air. The spa website describes the mine atmosphere as 'free of pollution and allergens, rich in micronutrients, with constant temperature, high humidity, and free from harmful radiation.' These conditions make it ideal for people with asthma and other respiratory issues.

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Poland's Wieliczka Salt Mine is truly stunning
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Poland's Wieliczka Salt Mine is truly stunning
Illuminated, Underground Saint Kinga Chapel in the Salt Mine in Wieliczka, Poland
The interior of the Salt Mine Museum of Wieliczka. Wieliczka, Poland. 27th August 2014 (Photo by Grzegorz Galazka\Archivio Grzegorz Galazka\Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images)
Chandelier with salt crystal in the church of Wieliczka cave.
Europe, Poland, Malopolska, Krakow, Wieliczka Salt Mine, tourist route, Chapel of St Kinga, Unesco site
POLAND - MAY 27: Chapel in the cathedral carved out of the rock salt in Wieliczka salt mine. (UNESCO World Heritage List, 1978), Poland. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
The interior of the Salt Mine Museum of Wieliczka. The chapel of Saint Kinga - 101 meters under the ground. Leonardo da Vinci's Last Supper is carved in the salt rock. 27th August 2014 (Photo by Grzegorz Galazka\Archivio Grzegorz Galazka\Mondadori Portfolio via Getty Images)
Salt floor in the church of the Weliczka cave.
(GERMANY OUT) Sculptures in Wieliczka Salt Mine, Krak�, Poland (Photo by Forster/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
Underground corridor in Wieliczka Salt Mine
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Illuminated, Underground Michalowice Chamber in the Salt Mine in Wieliczka, Poland
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Europe, Poland, Malopolska, Krakow, Wieliczka Salt Mine, tourist route, Unesco site; statue of Nicholas Copernicus
People walk near the entrance with a headframe of the Wieliczka Salt Mine near Krakow, southern Poland, December 15, 2011. According to the Supervisory Board of the Wieliczka Salt Mine, the historic mine extends for a total of about 300 km (186 miles) and functioned continuously since the Middle Ages until 1996 when the salt bed ceased to be exploited completely. The mine, which is on the UNESCO's Cultural and Natural Heritage list, currently serves tourism, museum and health purposes. Picture taken December 15, 2011. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel (POLAND - Tags: TRAVEL)
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There are multiple spa packages to take advantage of the 'natural inhaler,' but perhaps the most interesting is the option to sleep over within caves to see how the body adjusts to 11 hours of pure breathing. And if you really, really like the concept of spending a weekend underground, you can force your loved ones to come by holding your wedding in the Chapel of St. King; a stunning salt hall located 101 meters underground that can hold up to 400 of your most adventurous friends.

Getting down to these relaxing chambers is a little less peaceful. Unless you are pregnant, elderly or otherwise unable to walk, visitors to the popular Polish site are encouraged to descend down hundreds of shallow, wrapping steps, deep down into the ancient chutes. Once your legs stop burning, you will follow a guide through several layers of tunnels.

But, be sure to pay attention. The salt has been continuously mined for hundreds of years. Tourists walk two miles with their guides, but that is only two percent of the passages' length. Your therapeutic trip could take a dark twist within seconds.

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