Study: Many people remember events that never happened

By Patrick Jones, Buzz60

As it turns out, it's possible for people to remember events that didn't happen.

The University of Warwick looked into memories -- specifically fake memories -- to see if it's possible for people to believe something happened that never actually did.

They conducted a study with 400 participants and told these people about fictional events and told them to imagine the events happening to them.

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Then they asked the participants to recall those events. They looked into the responses, specifically to see if the participants would add details to the fake story.

They found 30 percent of the participants appeared to remember the fake stories happening and another 23 percent showed signs of accepting the story to some degree.

The researchers are saying it's possible to remember events that did not happen.

They say it's possible when someone is told about a fictional event and then imagines it over and over again.

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