Women urged to get to gynecologist before Trump takes office

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By Maria Mercedes Galuppo, Veuer

With Donald Trump being elected president, women have taken to social media, urging one another to visit their gynecologist before he takes office.

Trump has threatened to possibly defund Planned Parenthood, restrict abortions and repeal Obamacare, which offers birth control at no cost -- and this has women concerned for their reproductive rights.

SEE ALSO: Donald Trump to give first post-election interview on '60 Minutes'

Online, women are telling one another they have about 70 days to visit the gynecologist if they don't want to risk possibly losing free access to birth control.

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They're recommending intrauterine devices (IUDs) as an effective birth control, as they last between three to 12 years and can be removed whenever desired.

Without Obamacare, the loss of the benefit could cost women up to $1,000, and birth control pills could add a monthly spending of up to $50 a month.

American women are trending on Twitter with complaints about the situation.

One user writes, "I'm about to stock up on 4 years worth of birth control cuz I aint riskin my healthcare rights."

Another tweeted, "[W]hat's wild is me feeling forced into getting an IUD before Trump takes office so that he can't entirely take away my right to birth control."

Women are being encouraged to do research on different birth control methods and find what works best for them.

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Closeup still life of Zorane tablets, a series of low-estrogen birth control pills. Shown are three packs, one open, two closed. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
13th August 1968: Father Paul Weir expounds on his refusal to quit the Catholic church in the St Cecilia Presbytery in North Cheam. Father Paul, 31, was suspended from his duties because he disagrees with the Pope's ruling on birth control. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
(Photo via Getty)
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