Meteora Monasteries in Greece are awe-inspiring


The Monasteries of Meteora in Greece are stunningly beautiful.

Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, the grouping of six monasteries rests on natural sandstone rock pillars. They are part of the largest grouping of monolithic pillars near the town of Kalambaka.

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At over 1200 feet, the only way to reach them is to by staircases that are cut into the rock formations.

Meteora translates into 'suspended in the air', which is pretty accurate.

While there are only six monasteries still running, the area used to boast over 24. They were built back in the 14th to 16th century by hermit monks who were living in caves.

Visitors can pay three euros to visit the monasteries -- that is if you're willingly to make the trek.

RELATED: Greece's Tower of Winds, the world's first weather station:

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Greece's Tower of Winds, the world's first weather station
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Greece's Tower of Winds, the world's first weather station
The upper part of theTower of Winds, open to the public for the first time in more than 200 years after being restored, in the Roman Agora, in Plaka, central Athens, Greece, August 23, 2016. Picture taken August 23, 2016. REUTERS/Michalis Karagiannis
Tourists visit the Tower of the Winds, open to the public for the first time in more than 200 years after being restored, in the Roman Agora, in Plaka, central Athens, Greece, August 23, 2016. Picture taken August 23, 2016. REUTERS/Michalis Karagiannis
Tourists visit the Tower of the Winds, open to the public for the first time in more than 200 years after being restored, in the Roman Agora, in Plaka, central Athens, Greece, August 23, 2016. Picture taken August 23, 2016. REUTERS/Michalis Karagiannis
A guard is seen inside the Tower of the Winds, open to the public for the first time in more than 200 years after being restored, in the Roman Agora, in Plaka, central Athens, Greece, August 23, 2016. Picture taken August 23, 2016. REUTERS/Michalis Karagiannis
Tourists visit the Tower of the Winds, open to the public for the first time in more than 200 years after being restored, in the Roman Agora, in Plaka, central Athens, Greece, August 23, 2016. Picture taken August 23, 2016. REUTERS/Michalis Karagiannis
A view of the sculptures depicting winds on the 1st century BC Tower of the Winds or the Horologion of Andronikos, at the steps of the Acropolis , inside the archaeological site of the Roman Agora in Athens on August 23, 2016. The octagonal Roman-era hydraulic clock commonly known as the Tower of the Winds -- a reference to the sculptures carved on its façade -- the monument was used for Christian ceremonies under the Byzantines and as a dervish lodge during the Ottoman period. It opened to the public for the first time after extensive restoration works. / AFP / LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A view of the 1st century BC Tower of the Winds or the Horologion of Andronikos, inside the archaeological site of the Roman Agora in Athens on August 23, 2016. The octagonal Roman-era hydraulic clock commonly known as the Tower of the Winds -- a reference to the sculptures carved on its façade -- the monument was used for Christian ceremonies under the Byzantines and as a dervish lodge during the Ottoman period. It opened to the public for the first time after extensive restoration works. / AFP / LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
A person takes a picture of the the 1st century BC Tower of the Winds or the Horologion of Andronikos, inside the archaeological site of the Roman Agora in Athens on August 23, 2016. The octagonal Roman-era hydraulic clock commonly known as the Tower of the Winds -- a reference to the sculptures carved on its façade -- the monument was used for Christian ceremonies under the Byzantines and as a dervish lodge during the Ottoman period. It opened to the public for the first time after extensive restoration works. / AFP / LOUISA GOULIAMAKI (Photo credit should read LOUISA GOULIAMAKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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