Python in the pool: Viral video shows child swimming with rare albino Burmese python

Watch This Fearless 12-year-Old Girl Swim With a Huge Burmese Python

A glistening, yellow python slithering in a pool alongside a young girl is fascinating the internet.

California snake handler Corey Wallace published a video two years ago of his now 14-year-old daughter romping with a rare albino Burmese python in a wading pool.

Read: A Venomous Snake Was Found In A Child's Bed At A Daycare Center

Now, the footage, licensed by Viral Hog, is now picking up steam, capturing more than 2.4 million views.

In comments ranging from concerns about the serpent defecating in the pool to questions about the safety of his daughter, posters seemed both impressed and repulsed by the giant reptile.

"Aren't you worried it's gonna f***ing eat you?" wrote one commenter. "This is actually pretty cool to see," posted another.

Wallace said the 250-pound snake, called Sumatra, was always treated as a pet and was very docile.

She died six months ago of unknown causes, Wallace said. "It was very sad."

She was part of the family, which includes eight human children, Wallace said.

She was also part of Wallace's business, Redding Reptile Party, which brings a collection of snakes to kid's parties, schools, and even nursing homes, to educate people about snakes as well as entertain.

"Sumatra was the main attraction," he said. "You saw her and you were like 'Wow.' She'd come right up to your nose."

See more from this incredible story:

6 PHOTOS
Sumatra the python swims with her family
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Sumatra the python swims with her family

Sumatra the python swims with her family

(Photo credit: INSIDE EDITION/YouTube)

Sumatra the python swims with her family

(Photo credit: INSIDE EDITION/YouTube)

Sumatra the python swims with her family

(Photo credit: INSIDE EDITION/YouTube)

Sumatra the python swims with her family

(Photo credit: INSIDE EDITION/YouTube)

Sumatra the python swims with her family

(Photo credit: INSIDE EDITION/YouTube)

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Burmese pythons feed by "ambushing" prey, squeezing it to death and then eating it whole.

Read: Lowe and Behold! Venomous Snake in Tree Bites Hardware Store Customer

But Sumatra was gentle, and she didn't like killing her meals, so Wallace had to do it for her. He would dispatch a rabbit or a chicken with a strong blow to the back of the head, he said.

Only when the animal was dead would Sumatra eat it.

Related: Also see these fascinating snakes:

5 PHOTOS
Snakes where they aren't supposed to be
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Snakes where they aren't supposed to be
Climbing snake (Photo by Luca Manieri, Getty Images)
A model with tattoo poses with a python around her neck during 2015 China (Taiyuan) International Automobile Exhibition on August 6, 2015 in Taiyuan, Shanxi Province of China. 2015 China (Taiyuan) International Automobile Exhibition held from August 6-9. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
ANDREWS, SC - OCTOBER 09: A snake floats along the flood water being fed from the breached dams upstream as the water continues to reach areas in the eastern part of the state on October 9, 2015 in Andrews, South Carolina. The state of South Carolina experienced record rainfall amounts causing severe flooding and officials expect the damage from the flooding waters to be in the billions of dollars. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A snake phython type found on the street at Halim - Jakarta, Indonesia, on 8 December 2016. The snake stuck on the street causing a little traffick, but manage evacuated by a taxi driver to the near river at the location. (Photo by Donal Husni/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
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