Forget about playing Super Mario Run without internet

Super Mario Run is slated to arrive on December 15, but it appears there will be one weird requirement to play the game – an active internet connection.



In a recent interview with Mashable, Nintendo icon Shigeru Miyamoto confirmed that users won't be able to play the game unless connected to the internet, explaining the game-maker has implemented the requirement to curb piracy.

"[O]ur software [is] very important asset for us," said Miyamoto. "We wanted to be able to leverage that network connection [to offer] the game in a way that keeps the software secure."

Nintendo first announced the new release at the Apple Special Event in September, when it said it's bringing the Super Mario franchise to iOS. The Japanese company later revealed the game will also be available for Android.

A few days back, Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aimé swung by The Tonight Show to give Jimmy Fallon a preview of Super Mario Run as well as its new Switch console. He also said that loyal fans will have a chance to try out a demo the game in Apple stores worldwide.

In case you're curious to catch a sneak peek from the upcoming Super Mario Run but too lazy to walk to the Apple store, you can watch its creator Miyamotoplay the game while doing bicep curls.

Related: Nintendo around the world

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Nintendo, around the world
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Nintendo, around the world
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 11: A general view of atmosphere during the Super Smash Bros for Wii U event in West Hollywood, CA on November 11, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images for Nintendo of America)
Dozens of Pikachu characters, the famous character of Nintendo's videogame software Pokemon, parade at the Landmark Plaza shopping mall in Yokohama, suburban Tokyo on August 14, 2014. The Pikachu mascots walk around daily to attract summer vacationers as a part of the 'Great Pikachu Outbreak' event through the weekend. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
Customers play video games at an electric shop in Tokyo on October 29, 2014. Japanese videogame giant Nintendo said its first-half net profit soared to 132 million USD as a sharply weaker yen boosted its bottom line and offset slowing sales. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
Gaming fans play 'Fluster Cluck' at the annual E3 video game extravaganza in Los Angeles, California on June 10, 2014, where Microsoft and Sony are battling for the hearts of hard core gamers whose devotion could determine whether Xbox One or PlayStation 4 rule console play and Internet Age entertainment.. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A Super Mario display at the Nintendo section attracts attention at the annual E3 video game extravaganza in Los Angeles, California on June 10, 2014. Nintendo said it is adding real-world game figures to Wii U play to help boost the popularity of its console, which has lagged rivals in the market, with Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime saying 'amiibo' game pieces embedded with computer chips to swap data with Wii U tablet controllers would debut in the 'Mario Smash Brothers' game later this year. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - NOVEMBER 03: Actor Noah Munck attends Nintendo's celebration of the launch of Super Mario 3D Land at Siren Studios on November 3, 2011 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images for Nintendo)
390946 06: A potential customer tries out the new Nintendo Gameboy Advance computer game June 21, 2001 in London. The game is due to be released in Europe on June 22, 2001. (Photo by Sion Touhig/GettyImages)
Tokyo, JAPAN: Japan's first customer Kotaro Watanabe displays Nintendo's new video game console 'Wii' at a Tokyo electric shop, 02 December 2006, while Sega's game character Sonic the Hedgedog (R) celebrates him. Some thousands video game fans queued in early morning to buy the new video game console priced 25,000 yen (215 USD). AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
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