Gilead prices COVID-19 drug candidate remdesivir at $2,340 per patient

Gilead Sciences Inc has priced its COVID-19 drug candidate remdesivir at $2,340 for a five-day treatment in the United States and some other developed countries, it said on Monday, as it set the price for a single vial at $390.

The price for U.S. private insurance companies will be $520 per vial, the drugmaker said, which equates to $3,120 per patient for a treatment course using 6 vials of remdesivir.

This is below the $5,080 per course recommendation by U.S. drug pricing research group, the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, last week.

Gilead has entered into an agreement with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), with the agency and states set to manage allocation to hospitals until the end of September.

HHS has secured more than 500,000 treatment courses of the drug for American hospitals through September, the agency said on Monday.

This represents 100% of Gilead's projected production for July of 94,200 treatment courses, 90% of production in August and September, in addition to an allocation for clinical trials, HHS said.

After this period, once supplies are less constrained, HHS will stop managing the allocation, Gilead said.

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A pharmacist gives Jennifer Haller, left, the first shot in the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, Monday, March 16, 2020, at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Jennifer Haller poses for a photo in the living room of her home, Monday, March 16, 2020, in Seattle. Earlier in the day, Haller was the first person to receive a shot of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, at the start of the first-stage safety study clinical trial of the vaccine at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Pharmacist Michael Witte opens a package taken from a freezer that contains the potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, on the first day of a first-stage safety study clinical trial of the vaccine, Monday, March 16, 2020, at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Pharmacist Michael Witte, left, gives Rebecca Sirull, right, a shot in the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, Monday, March 16, 2020, at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. Sirull is the third patient to receive the shot in the study. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Jennifer Haller is reflected in a mirror as she waits in an exam room before she was given a shot in the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential coronavirus vaccine, Monday, March 16, 2020, at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. Haller was the first person to receive the shot in the study. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Pharmacist Michael Witte, left, gives Neal Browning, right, a shot in the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus Monday, March 16, 2020, at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. Browning is the second patient to receive the shot in the study. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
The first clinical trials to find a coronavirus vaccine have begun at a hospital in Seattle. A total of 45 men and women have volunteered to be injected. Unlike most vaccines, these COVID-19 vaccines have not been tested on mice, and will go directly to humans due to the urgent need for the drug. Lisa Guerrero spoke with Neal Browning, one of the men who is participating in the trial. He explained what he has to go through as part of this brave new experiment.
The first clinical trials to find a coronavirus vaccine have begun at a hospital in Seattle. A total of 45 men and women have volunteered to be injected. Unlike most vaccines, these COVID-19 vaccines have not been tested on mice, and will go directly to humans due to the urgent need for the drug. Lisa Guerrero spoke with Neal Browning, one of the men who is participating in the trial. He explained what he has to go through as part of this brave new experiment.
Pharmacist Michael Witte, left, gives Rebecca Sirull, right, a shot in the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for the coronavirus, Monday, March 16, 2020, at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. Sirull is the third patient to receive the shot in the study. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Dr. Lisa Jackson, a senior investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, poses for a photo, Sunday, March 15, 2020, in Seattle. Jackson is leading the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, which was given to the first volunteer in the study by injection, Monday, March 16 in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Dr. Lisa Jackson, a senior investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, works in her office with an image of COVID-19 taped to her door, Sunday, March 15, 2020, in Seattle. Jackson is leading the first-stage safety study clinical trial of a potential vaccine for COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, which was given to the first volunteer in the study by injection, Monday, March 16. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Rebecca Sirull, center, poses for a photo with her roommates, Anna Thomas, left, and Madeleine Busch, Monday, March 16, 2020, at the home they share in Seattle. Earlier in the day, Sirull was the third person to receive a shot of a potential vaccine for the COVID-19 coronavirus at the start of the first-stage safety study clinical trial of the vaccine at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Rebecca Sirull works on her laptop, Monday, March 16, 2020, at her home in Seattle. Earlier in the day, Sirull, an editorial coordinator for the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, was the third person to receive a shot of a potential vaccine for the COVID-19 coronavirus at the start of the first-stage safety study clinical trial of the vaccine at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute in Seattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
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Remdesivir's price has been a topic of intense debate since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved its emergency use in some COVID-19 patients in May. Experts have said that Gilead would need to avoid the appearance of taking advantage of a health crisis for profits.

Wall Street analysts have said the antiviral drug could generate billions of dollars in revenue over the next couple of years if the pandemic continues.

Gilead has tied up with generic drugmakers based in India and Pakistan, including Cipla Ltd and Hetero Labs Ltd, to make and supply remdesivir in 127 developing countries.

Cipla's version is priced at less than 5,000 Indian rupees ($66.24), while Hetero Lab's version is priced at 5,400 rupees.

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