The 2020 battle is on: Elizabeth Warren accuses Joe Biden of siding with credit card companies over struggling Americans

Sen. Elizabeth Warren became the first 2020 Democrat to directly attack former Vice President Joe Biden following his Thursday announcement that he's joining the presidential primary.

Asked by a reporter on Thursday about a 2005 fight the two had over bankruptcy legislation, Warren was clear that she believed Biden took the side opposing American families.

"I got in that fight because [families] just didn't have anyone and Joe Biden was on the side of the credit card companies," Warren said after a rally in Iowa. "It's all a matter of public record." 

RELATED: Take a look at Elizabeth Warren's interaction with Wells Fargo former CEO: 

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Elizabeth Warren questions Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf
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Elizabeth Warren questions Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf
Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf arrives to testify before a Senate Banking Committee hearing on the firm's sales practices on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) questions Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf (not pictured) during his testimony before a Senate Banking Committee hearing on the firm's sales practices on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
US Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, questions John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, as he testifies about the unauthorized opening of accounts by Wells Fargo during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 20, 2016. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, left, speaks with Senator Joe Donnelly, a Democrat from Indiana, before John Stumpf, chief executive officer of Wells Fargo & Co., not pictured, testifies in front of the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. Stumpf, struggling to quell public rancor after the bank's employees opened unauthorized accounts for legions of customers, said the company has expanded its review of the matter to include 2009 and 2010. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
US Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, questions John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, as he testifies about the unauthorized opening of accounts by Wells Fargo during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 20, 2016. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
US Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, holds up copies of Wells Fargo earnings call transcripts as she questions John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, as he testifies about the unauthorized opening of accounts by Wells Fargo during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 20, 2016. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 20: Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Joe Donnelly, D-Ind., talk before a Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs hearing in Dirksen on unauthorized accounts opened under customers 'names at Wells Fargo featuring testimony by CEO John Stumpf, September 20, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 20: From left, Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and Joe Donnelly, D-Ind., attend a Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs hearing in Dirksen Building on unauthorized accounts opened under customers' names at Wells Fargo featuring testimony by CEO John Stumpf, September 20, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
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Warren, then a Harvard law professor, publicly sparred with then-Sen. Biden over legislation he supported that made it harder for Americans to file for bankruptcy. Warren, a bankruptcy law expert, contended that the bill would eliminate crucial protections for struggling families, while boosting banks and the credit industry.

Read more: Here's where 2020 Democratic presidential candidates stand on impeaching Trump

Warren accused Biden of inserting abortion protections into the bill as a way to win Democratic support and called the effort "cynical and opportunistic" in a 2002 New York Times op-ed entitled "A Quiet Attack on Women."

"Do politicians like Mr. Biden who support the bankruptcy bill believe they can give credit-card companies the right to elbow out women and children so long as they rally behind an issue like abortion?" Warren wrote of the legislation. "The message is unmistakable: On an economic issue that attracts millions of dollars of industry support, women have no real political importance."

Read more: Elizabeth Warren says Joe Biden 'needs to answer' for inappropriate touching allegations

A handful of 2020 candidates, including Sens. Bernie Sanders and Kamala Harris, and Rep. Beto O'Rourke, sent out fundraising emails to their supporters on Thursday with Biden's name in the subject line.

"As of this morning, my friend Joe Biden is now running for president. And you know what I say to that? The more, the merrier!" Harris wrote in a message asking her supporters to chip in to her campaign.

SEE ALSO: Here's where 2020 Democratic presidential candidates stand on impeaching Trump

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