Stocks hold gains as Trump announces a temporary end to the government shutdown

  • US equity markets opened higher Friday and held their gains after President Donald Trump announced a temporary end to the government shutdown.
  • The major averages were up between 0.7% and 1.2%. 
  • Watch stocks trade live.

US equity markets opened higher Friday and saw little response to President Donald Trump announcing he will sign a bill to open the government for three weeks, temporarily ending the partial government shutdown through at least February 15. 

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was higher by 170 points, or about 0.7%, while the S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite were up 0.8% and 1.2% respectively. 

Airline stocks were mixed after the Federal Aviation Administration invoked ground stops at some of the nation's busiest airports as air-traffic controllers, working without pay, began calling out sick. American Airlines (+4.9%) led the space higher while JetBlue (-0.9%) paced the decline. Delta Air Lines (+0.7%) was little changed.  

On JetBlue's fourth-quarter earnings call Friday, CEO Robin Hayes said that while there has not yet been a "significant impact" on its bookings or operations, "we are close to a tipping point" as security screeners, air traffic controllers, and other federal aviation workers were about to miss a second paycheck.  

RELATED: Take a look at furloughed workers' protests during the government shutdown:

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Furloughed workers protest amid government shutdown
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Furloughed workers protest amid government shutdown
Union workers demonstrate in front of the White House against the government shutdown on January 10, 2019, in Washington, DC. - US President Donald Trump headed Thursday to the US-Mexico border to push his demand for a wall, a day after he walked out of negotiations with Democrats in a political crisis paralyzing the government. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Union members and Internal Revenue Service workers rally outside an IRS Service Center to call for an end to the partial government shutdown, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019, in Covington, Ky. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
IRS worker Christine Helquist joins a federal workers protest rally outside the Federal Building, Thursday, Jan., 10, 2019, in Ogden, Utah. Payday will come Friday without any checks for about 800,000 federal employees affected by the government shutdown, forcing workers to scale back spending, cancel trips, apply for unemployment benefits and take out loans to stay afloat. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
IRS worker Angela Gran, center, and others participate in a federal workers protest rally outside the Federal Building, Thursday, Jan., 10, 2019, in Ogden, Utah. Payday will come Friday without any checks for about 800,000 federal employees affected by the government shutdown, forcing workers to scale back spending, cancel trips, apply for unemployment benefits and take out loans to stay afloat. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
Cheryl Monroe, right, a Food and Drug Administration employee, and Bertrice Sanders, a Social Security Administration employee, rally to call for an end to the partial government shutdown in Detroit, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Government workers rally against the partial government shutdown at Federal Plaza, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019, in Chicago. The partial government shutdown continues to drag on with hundreds of thousands of federal workers off the job or working without pay as the border wall fight persists. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)
People gather during a federal workers protest rally at the Federal Building Thursday, Jan., 10, 2019, in Ogden, Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
People gather during a federal workers protest rally at the Federal Building Thursday, Jan., 10, 2019, in Ogden, Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
Furloughed TSA worker Marae Persson shows participates in a federal workers protest rally at the Federal Building Thursday, Jan., 10, 2019, in Ogden, Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
Furloughed National Park Service ranger Kathryn Gilson, center, listens as fellow furloughed ranger Sean Ghazala, left, speaks to the media, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019, during a press conference and rally at Staten Island's La Colmena Center in New York. Ghazala is based at Manhattan's African Burial Ground, and Gilson works at Gateway National Recreation Area, a national park encompassing wetlands surrounding New York city and parts of New Jersey's coastline. Gilson says she is home "bouncing off the walls" and worrying about paying her bills and student loan. Staten Island is a largely Republican borough of New York city, but Democrat Max Rose recently defeated his Republican opponent in the 2018 congressional elections. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)
People rally to call for an end to the partial government shutdown in Detroit, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Union members and other federal employees protest the government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Union members protest the government shutdown on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Union members and other federal employees stop in front of the White House in Washington during a rally to call for an end to the partial government shutdown, Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. . (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
A demonstrator holds a 'Stop The Shutdown' sign during a rally with union members and federal employees to end the partial government shutdown outside the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. The partial government shutdown entered its 20th day today as its impact is more widely felt with about 800,000 federal workers who will miss their paychecks on Friday. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Union workers demonstrate in front of the White House against the government shutdown on January 10, 2019, in Washington, DC. - US President Donald Trump headed Thursday to the US-Mexico border to push his demand for a wall, a day after he walked out of negotiations with Democrats in a political crisis paralyzing the government. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
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Meanwhile, Coffee giant Starbucks gained close to 3% after reporting better-than-expected top and bottom line results, and raising its forecast for the adjusted-earnings-per-share forecast for the fiscal year. 

Traders shrugged off disappointing quarterly results from Intel, which sent shares sliding by 5.7%. The chipmaker missed on earnings and revenue and said it sees trouble in China. "Our trade and macro [economic] concerns, especially in China, have intensified," interim CEO Bob Swan said on the earnings call. 

On the commodities front, gold jumped 1.3% to near $1,298 an ounce, and was flirting with its first close above $1,300 for the first time in seven months.

Meanwhile, Treasury yields rose, with the 10-year up 4 basis points at 2.76%. The US dollar traded down 0.7% versus a basket of its major peers. 

NOW WATCH: 7 science-backed ways to a happier and healthier 2019 that you can do the first week of the new year

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A fund manager at a $1.7 trillion investing giant reveals how he's preparing in case stocks crash again — and outlines the risks that could plunge the market into chaos 
The world's biggest stock bear says we're in a dangerous 'trap-door situation' — and explains why you shouldn't be fooled by the market's recent surge

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