Scammers are trying to use Netflix to steal your money

Netflix users are being warned not to fall for highly-convincing phishing emails that ask them to update their payment details.

The fake emails claim to be from the streaming giant but are actually from criminals trying to steal customers’ money.

The message says: “We’re having some trouble with your current billing information. We’ll try again, but in the meantime you may want to update your payment details.”

At the end of the message, there is a red button that tells you to “update account now”. The link is to a fake website run by scammers who can use the information you enter to hack into your back account.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC), a US government agency that deals with consumer protection, issued a warning urging Netflix users not to “take the bait”.

“Scammers use your information to steal your money, your identity or both,” it said. “They also use phishing emails to get access to your computer or network. If you click on a link, they can install ransomware or other programs that can lock you out of your data.”

The FTC offered the following tips to beat scams. Netflix users should:

  • Check it out. If you have concerns about the email, contact the company directly. Look up its phone number or website to make sure you’re getting the real company, and not a scammer.
  • Take a closer look. Bad grammar and spelling can tip you off to phishing. Other clues: Your name is missing or you don’t even have an account with the company. Listing only an international phone number is also suspicious.
  • Report phishing emails. For Netflix, forward the message to phishing@netflix.com. In the UK, you can also report messages to Action Fraud.

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400303 03: Ready-to-be-shipped DVDs roll down an assembly line January 29, 2002 in San Jose, CA. The online DVD rental site Netflix.com has 500,000 subscribers who can rent, receive and return unlimited discs per month by mail. (Photo By Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
400303 01: Netflix.com Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings holds a ready-to-be-shipped DVD January 29, 2002 in San Jose, CA. The online DVD rental site has 500,000 subscribers who can rent, receive and return unlimited discs per month by mail. (Photo By Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
400303 05: Packages of DVDs await shipment at the Netflix.com headquarters January 29, 2002 in San Jose, CA. The online DVD rental site has 500,000 subscribers who can rent, receive and return unlimited discs per month by mail. (Photo By Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Netflix CEO Reed Hastings gives a keynote address, January 6, 2016 at the CES 2016 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada. AFP PHOTO / ROBYN BECK / AFP / ROBYN BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
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