Walmart is bucking a major holiday hiring trend, and it could be a brilliant move

  • Walmart isn't hiring a ton of seasonal employees for the holiday rush this year.
  • This holiday strategy stands in contrast with that of other retailers, like Target.
  • Walmart representative told Business Insider that the chain's practice reflects the investment it's put into training its associates.

The holidays are fast approaching, but Walmart isn't following the trend of bulking up its workforce with a slew of seasonal hires.

For the third year in a row, the retail giant plans to handle the holiday rush by offering its 1.5 million US-based employees extra hours in order to handle the holiday rush. This strategy sets Walmart apart from retailers, like Amazon and Kohl's, that bring in temporary workers during the busier times of the year.

"Many associates are interested in working extra hours during the holidays," a Walmart representative told Time.

A Walmart representative told Business Insider that the strategy reflects the chain's investment in training its associates.

RELATED: Take a look at all the retailers that have filed for bankruptcy in 2018:

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Every retailer who filed for bankruptcy in 2018

A'gaci

Women's apparel and accessories retailer A'Gaci filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in January. 

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Kiko USA

Cosmetics retailer Kiko USA Inc filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in January.

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Tops Markets

Tops Markets operates 174 supermarkets — called Tops Friendly Markets. The company filed for bankruptcy protection in February.

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The Bon-Ton Stores

The Bon-Ton Stores owns multiple department store chains including Bon-Ton, Bergner's, Boston Store, Carson's, Elder-Beerman, Herberger's, and Younkers. The company filed for bankruptcy in February.

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Remington Outdoor

Remington filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in March.

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The Walking Company

The shoe seller The Walking Company, which operates 208 stores in the US, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in March.

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Claire's

The jewelry chain Claire's filed for bankruptcy in March.

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Southeastern Grocers

Southeastern Grocers, the parent company of the grocery chains Winn-Dixie, Harveys and Bi-Lo, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in March.

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Nine West

Nine West Holdings filed for bankruptcy in April.

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Bertucci's

Italian casual-dining chain Bertucci's filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in April.

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Rockport

The footwear brand filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in May.

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National Stores

The owner of the Fallas chain of discount stores filed for bankruptcy in August.

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Brookstone

Brookstone filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in August.

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Samuels Jewelers

Samuels Jewelers filed for Chapter 11 with an agreement for bankruptcy financing in August.

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Toys R Us

Toys R Us filed for bankruptcy in September.

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Mattress Firm

Mattress Firm filed for bankruptcy in October.

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Sears

Sears filed for bankruptcy in October.

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"We've got a really strong, trained workforce that's able to take on those hours," the representative said.

The representative said that extra hours are there for associates who want them throughout the year, but added that associates aren't forced to take on more hours.

Back in 2016, the organization OUR Walmart successfully petitionedfor a new scheduling system that enabled associates to ask for more hours.

Nowadays, Walmart's policy of relying on associates might spare the employer somewhat amidst a tight job market that favors "employees over employers," Business Insider's Rachel Premack reported.

The job market is causing problems for retailers that rely on the labor of seasonal workers. Business Insider's Mary Hanbury reported that Target, JCPenney, Kohl's, and Macy's will likely feel the pinch during the annual hunt for seasonal workers.

Are you a Walmart employee with a story to share? Email acain@businessinsider.com. 

SEE ALSO: Walmart says it will save more than $200 million by making 2 minor changes

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