New York City homeowners are cutting prices in a way not seen since the financial crisis

  • The number of New York City home sellers who cut their asking prices spiked to the highest level since 2009 during the week after Labor Day, according to StreetEasy. 
  • The real-estate website also saw its biggest wave of new listings around the same period, as sellers tried to attract New Yorkers who were returning from their summer vacations. 
  • Unlike 2009, the housing market is in much better shape. 

In one way, it's 2009 all over again in New York City's housing market

The number of home sellers who cut their asking prices reached the highest level since 2009 during the week after Labor Day, according to StreetEasy.

16 PHOTOS
16 cities where Americans are struggling to pay rent
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16 cities where Americans are struggling to pay rent

Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas

Median income: $54,876

Share of income spent on rent: 28.40%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 21.8%

Houston, Texas

Median income: $47,010

Share of income spent on rent: 28.80%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 24.40%

Portland, Oregon

Median income: $58,423

Share of income spent on rent: 29.90%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 23.50%

Seattle, Washington

Median income: $74,458

Share of income spent on rent: 30.90%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 23.80%

Tampa, Florida

Median income: $45,874

Share of income spent on rent: 31%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 27.60%

Orlando, Florida

Median income: $44,007

Share of income spent on rent: 31.50%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 22.70%

Denver, Colorado

Median income: $56,258

Share of income spent on rent: 32%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 23.60%

Sacramento, California

Median income: $52,071

Share of income spent on rent: 32.40%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 31.80%

Boston, Massachusetts

Median income: $58,516

Share of income spent on rent: 32.70%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 26.40%

San Jose, California

Median income: $90,303

Share of income spent on rent: 35.60%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 26.10%

Riverside, California

Median income: $58,979

Share of income spent on rent: 36.80%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 32.70%

New York, New York

Median income: $55,191

Share of income spent on rent: 37.70%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 26.30%

San Francisco, California

Median income: $87,701

Share of income spent on rent: 39.20%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 30.60%

San Diego, California

Median income: $68,117

Share of income spent on rent: 40.30%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 34.70%

Miami-Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Median income: $41,645

Share of income spent on rent: 40.30%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 28.60%

Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, California

Median income: $55,151

Share of income spent on rent: 46.90%

Historic share of income spent on rent (1985-2000): 36.30%

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Sellers needed to be more aggressive with pricing because buyers had many more choices. Grant Long, a senior economist at StreetEasy, said the listings website saw its biggest two weeks for new listings at the same time, as sellers moved to entice New Yorkers who were returning from their summer vacations. This only worsened an existing glut of for-sale inventory on the market. 

Homeowners cut prices on 774 properties, more than the previous record of 713 set in March 2009, StreetEasy said. That represented nearly 5% of all homes, which was the highest since February 2009. 

That year was when StreetEasy started tracking the data, amid an economic recession that was blamed largely on the housing market's crash. Even though the year brings back painful memories for many homeowners, the market is a lot healthier now.

If there's any talk of a new housing crisis, it's the shortage of relatively affordable inventory for the droves of buyers. And there will be many more buyers to come, as millennials mature and work to achieve the life goal that is homeownership. 

"In this climate, with high inventory and price cuts, the tips for buyers we offered over the summer remain as relevant as ever: Be picky, be patient, and be prepared to negotiate," Long wrote.

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