What the royal family’s decadent lifestyle costs British taxpayers

Buckingham Palace, the administrative headquarters of the British monarch, released its 2017-18 annual financial statement last month.

By all accounts, the pomp, circumstance and pageantry associated with the royal family costs the British people 65 pence, or 86 cents, per person in the United Kingdom. Considering the queen, who acts as the head of state and head of nation, does it all for less than a dollar per person, the British people are getting “excellent value for money,” according to Keeper of the Privy Purse Sir Alan Reid.

The royal family sustains its family fortune with a deep portfolio of diversified investments, but the members also know how to spend it. Who among the royal family are big spenders, and where does the money go?

Click through to read more about how the royals spend their money.

This article originally appeared on GOBankingRates.com: What the Royal Family’s Decadent Life Costs Taxpayers

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