Tesla is reportedly closing up to 14 solar installation facilities (TSLA)

  • Tesla will close up to 14 solar installation facilities, Reuters reports.
  • A Tesla representative declined to comment on the number of solar installation facilities the company is closing but told Business Insider that cuts to the company's energy division were consistent with the company's overall rate of 9%.
  • The representative also said that, over the long term, Tesla's solar energy and electric vehicle businesses will be the same size.
  • Last week, Tesla CEO Elon Musk said the company would not renew its agreement with Home Depot to sell solar panels and battery packs at the retailer's stores.

Tesla will close up to 14 solar installation facilities, Reuters reports.

Internal documents reviewed by the publication listed the either 13 or 14 facilities Tesla plans to close. The closures will affect installation facilities in California, New York, Texas, Maryland, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Arizona, and Delaware, according to Reuters.

Around 60 facilities will reportedly stay open.

A Tesla representative declined to comment on the number of solar installation facilities the company is closing but told Business Insider that cuts to the company's energy division were consistent with the company's overall rate of 9%. The representative also said that, over the long term, Tesla's solar energy and electric vehicle businesses will be the same size.

RELATED: Tesla's Model X SUV

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Tesla's Model X SUV
Tesla Motors Inc.'s Model X vehicle is unveiled at Tesla's design studio in Hawthorne, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. The Model X, touted by Tesla as faster than Porsche AG's 911 sports car and roomier than Audi AG's Q7 SUV, will be built in 2013 at the company's Fremont, California, plant that starts making the Model S this year. The CUV sports 'Falcon Doors,' dual AWD units, seating for seven and a price tag just under $50,000 after federal tax credits. (Photo by Tim Rue/Corbis via Getty Images)
Tesla Motors Inc.'s Model X vehicle is unveiled at Tesla's design studio in Hawthorne, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. The Model X, touted by Tesla as faster than Porsche AG's 911 sports car and roomier than Audi AG's Q7 SUV, will be built in 2013 at the company's Fremont, California, plant that starts making the Model S this year. The CUV sports 'Falcon Doors,' dual AWD units, seating for seven and a price tag just under $50,000 after federal tax credits. (Photo by Tim Rue/Corbis via Getty Images)
Tesla Motors Inc.'s Model X vehicle is unveiled at Tesla's design studio in Hawthorne, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. The Model X, touted by Tesla as faster than Porsche AG's 911 sports car and roomier than Audi AG's Q7 SUV, will be built in 2013 at the company's Fremont, California, plant that starts making the Model S this year. The CUV sports 'Falcon Doors,' dual AWD units, seating for seven and a price tag just under $50,000 after federal tax credits. (Photo by Tim Rue/Corbis via Getty Images)
Tesla Motors Inc.'s Model X vehicle is unveiled at Tesla's design studio in Hawthorne, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. The Model X, touted by Tesla as faster than Porsche AG's 911 sports car and roomier than Audi AG's Q7 SUV, will be built in 2013 at the company's Fremont, California, plant that starts making the Model S this year. The CUV sports 'Falcon Doors,' dual AWD units, seating for seven and a price tag just under $50,000 after federal tax credits. (Photo by Tim Rue/Corbis via Getty Images)
The interior of a Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) is displayed during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The interior of a Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) is displayed during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) is driven during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) is driven during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) is displayed during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
FREMONT, CA - SEPTEMBER 29: Tesla CEO Elon Musk steps out of the new Tesla Model X during an event to launch the company's new crossover SUV on September 29, 2015 in Fremont, California. After several production delays, Elon Mush officially launched the much anticipated Tesla Model X Crossover SUV. The (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
The second row seats of the Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) are seen during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Tesla Model X sports utility vehicles (SUV) stand on the factory floor ahead of assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An employee looks inside a Tesla Model X sports utility vehicle (SUV) following assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Model X sports utility vehicle (SUV) drives into a rain testing chamber during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Employees fit rear axles to Tesla Model X sports utility vehicles (SUV) as they sit in elevated cradles during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Tesla Model X sports utility vehicles (SUV) stand on hydraulic platforms during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Model X sports utility vehicle (SUV) undergoes wheel alignment checks during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Electrical charging stations stand on the factory floor at the Tesla Motors Inc. electric automobile factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A battery pack stands on a trolley as Tesla Model X sports utility vehicles (SUV) sit in cradles during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The rear gull wing doors of a Tesla Model X sports utility vehicle (SUV) sit open following assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The rear gull wing doors of a Tesla Model X sports utility vehicle (SUV) sit open during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Model X electric SUV is seen charging in Washington, DC, on December 20, 2016. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
The interior information screen is seen on the dashboard of a Tesla Motors Inc. Model X P90D electric sport utility vehicle (SUV) at a Tesla Motors Inc. showroom in London, U.K., on Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. Tesla customers in the U.K. may find their Christmas cash goes a little further than expected after the U.S. electric-auto manufacturer's plans to raise prices 5 percent in the U.K. have been put off until Jan. 15 from the original beginning-of-the-year deadline. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Motors Inc. Model X P90D electric sport utility vehicle (SUV) stands on display at a Tesla Motors Inc. showroom in London, U.K., on Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. Tesla customers in the U.K. may find their Christmas cash goes a little further than expected after the U.S. electric-auto manufacturer's plans to raise prices 5 percent in the U.K. have been put off until Jan. 15 from the original beginning-of-the-year deadline. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Tesla Inc. Model X P100D sports utility vehicles (SUV) sit on display at the company's new showroom in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The Meatpacking District location, which opens to the public at 11 a.m. Friday, lets customers for the first time explore energy offerings, configure cars and place orders all under one roof. Photographer: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Inc. Model X P100D sports utility vehicle (SUV) sits on display at the company's new showroom in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The Meatpacking District location, which opens to the public at 11 a.m. Friday, lets customers for the first time explore energy offerings, configure cars and place orders all under one roof. Photographer: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The interior of a Tesla Inc. Model X P100D sports utility vehicle (SUV) is seen at the company's new showroom in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The Meatpacking District location, which opens to the public at 11 a.m. Friday, lets customers for the first time explore energy offerings, configure cars and place orders all under one roof. Photographer: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Inc. Model X P100D sports utility vehicle (SUV), left, sits on display at the company's new showroom in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The Meatpacking District location, which opens to the public at 11 a.m. Friday, lets customers for the first time explore energy offerings, configure cars and place orders all under one roof. Photographer: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The front trunk space of a Tesla Inc. Model X P100D sports utility vehicle (SUV) is seen at the company's new showroom in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The Meatpacking District location, which opens to the public at 11 a.m. Friday, lets customers for the first time explore energy offerings, configure cars and place orders all under one roof. Photographer: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Last week, Tesla laid off about 9% of its employees in an effort to cut costs and eliminate redundancies, CEO Elon Musk said.

Musk has said that Tesla will become profitable in the second half of 2018 and won't need to raise money for the rest of the year, despite skepticism from some investors and analysts. Tesla has been known to spend cash quickly and post consistent losses in the 15 years since its founding.

The company posted an adjusted loss of $3.35 per share on revenue of $3.41 billion during the first quarter. Analysts had predicted an adjusted loss of $3.42 per share on revenue of $3.32 billion.

Musk also said last week that the company would not renew its agreement with Home Depot to sell solar panels and battery packs at the retailer's stores. Musk said most Tesla employees who had worked at the Home Depot displays would be allowed to move to Tesla's stores. 

Tesla bought the solar installation company SolarCity in 2016 for $2.6 billion. At the time, some criticized the acquisition as a bailout of a business operated by two of Musk's cousins, Peter and Lyndon Rive. Musk was the chairman of SolarCity's board of directors before Tesla purchased the company.

Tesla makes and sells solar panels, a home battery, and solar roof tiles that resemble traditional roof tiles. In its first-quarter earnings report this year, Tesla said it made a record number of installations and increased the backlog of orders for its Powerwall home batteries. The company said solar panel installations have decreased in recent quarters due to a shift in its strategy, which has included a move away from the door-to-door sales model SolarCity used before it was acquired.

If you've worked for Tesla and have a story to share, you can contact this reporter at mmatousek@businessinsider.com.

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