H&R Block is tumbling hard because of Trump's tax plan

  • H&R Block is dropping hard Wednesday in pre-market trading.
  • Disappointing sales guidance for 2019 seems to be the catalyst for the stock drop. 
  • The new tax code could hurt the company's pricing, thus the 2019 guidance.
  • Watch H&R Block trade in real time here. 

Shares of H&R Block are plumetting as much as 21% in pre-market trading Wednesday. 

This is after the tax preparation company released 2019 guidance below what Wall Street had estiamted. Revenue guidance is $3.05 billion to $3.1 billion, compared to analysts projections of $3.14 billion.

8 PHOTOS
8 states that will have no income tax by 2021
See Gallery
8 states that will have no income tax by 2021

1. Alaska

Alaska is one of the most tax-friendly places to live in the U.S., and is the only state to have no levied sales tax or state income tax. This means retirees can escape having any of their retirement income or Social Security benefits touched by the state of Alaska. To boot, senior homeowners over the age of 65, or a surviving spouse over age 60, are exempt from municipal taxes on the first $150,000 of assessed value of their home. The downside, the winters can be a bit harsh in Alaska, and access to medical care could be dicey if you don't live near one of its few major cities.

2. Florida

Florida is an especially popular destination for retirees, and with good reason: There's no state income tax, and therefore no tax on any retirement income. Long-time residents may also privy to a homestead exemption of up to $50,000 on their property, depending on the city or municipality in which they live. If there is a double-edged sword in Florida, it's the weather. Florida's temperate climate is perfect for folks of all ages, but it also gets hit by hurricanes more than any other state, leading to the highest home insurance costs in the country.

3. Nevada

Residents of Nevada are sure to feel like they've struck the jackpot given that it has no state income tax, as well as a relatively low state-levied 5.5% sales tax. Though there are no exemptions on property tax, Nevada's property tax rate is well below the national average. With the biggest downsides likely being its very toasty summers, or its limited access to specialized medical care if you live outside of its very few major cities, Nevada has a lot to offer folks of all ages.

4. South Dakota

The home to Mount Rushmore is another state where your income can potentially stretch a bit farther. South Dakota has no state income tax, and its state-levied tax is just 4.5%. Additionally, an analysis by Money has shown that South Dakota has one of the lowest costs of living in the nation, allowing those with low- or mid-level incomes to stretch their dollars. Though median home prices are lower than the national average, property tax rates (as a percentage) are a bit higher than the national average, and South Dakota's relatively sparse population could make specialized medical care a bit tougher to come by.

5. Texas

The Lone Star state is a popular destination for those who despise income taxes, as well as retirees who don't want their retirement accounts touched. Homestead exemptions on property taxes are open to all residents of the state, with seniors over the age of 65 potentially qualifying for extra breaks. On the downside, Texas hits its residents with a pretty hefty 7% state sales tax, and its median property tax is high on a percentage basis, relative to the national average.

6. Washington

Calling the Evergreen State home comes with the sizable perk of no state income tax. This means Washington can't touch any of your retirement income, should you choose to retire there. Its temperate climate, where all four seasons are represented, is another plus. However, Washingtonians should also prepare for a substantial state and local sales tax burden, as well as reasonably high nominal property tax bills, primarily as a result of higher property values than the national average.

7. Wyoming

Wyoming may have saved the best for last, because in addition to no state income tax, and therefore no tax on retirement income, its residents also face one of the lowest combined state and local tax levies in the country. Wyoming's oil- and mineral-rich land provides an ample revenue stream, which means not having to pilfer the pockets of its residents via taxation. Even property taxes in Wyoming are well below average, with numerous relief programs in place. If there are downsides, it's the state's harsh winters and potentially sparse access to specialized medical care.

8. And by 2021: Tennessee

Finally, by 2021, the Volunteer State will also be income tax-free. As of right now, the Hall income tax allows for a relatively low tax rate on dividends and interest income above an exempted amount. In 2018, the Hall income tax rate is just 3%. Next year, it'll be 2%, By 2020, just 1%. And beginning on Jan. 1, 2021, it'll be completely phased out, allowing residents to keep all of their interest and dividend income, as well as avoiding state tax on wage and retirement income. When coupled with its relatively low property taxes, Tennessee could become popular with retirees. Just one downside to note: Its combined sales and local tax rate is among the highest in the country.

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The disappointing forecast is likely a result of the new tax code. Now that the tax rate is lower and the code is simpler, H&R Block has a bit of a problem. When client's tax filings are more complex, H&R Block has more pricing power. Now, filings will be more straightforward and prices could be driven downward.

Shares are down 10.65% on the year. 

NOW WATCH: How to survive a snake bite

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Trump's weak North Korea summit may be the beginning of the end for the US as the world's leader

Read Full Story