Cambridge Analytica's ex-data chief is touting his services as a 'privacy advocate' after the crippling Facebook scandal

  • Former Cambridge Analytica data chief Alexander Tayler is now touting his services as a "privacy advocate" following the Facebook data scandal.
  • He has a website offering his consultancy services, stating that he can offer strategic advice on "data analytics and data regulatory compliance."
  • CambridgeAnalytica collapsed last month and is the subject of a number of investigations after it was accused of weaponising the data of 87 million Facebook users for political means.


Alexander Tayler, Cambridge Analytica's former chief data officer and acting CEO, is now touting his services as a "data privacy advocate" after the company's collapse.

Tayler has established a website promoting his expertise, first spotted by the Financial Times. He has also updated his LinkedIn with his current role as an independent consultant.

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A man fixes posters depicting Cambridge Analytica's CEO Alexander Nix behind bars, with the slogan 'Our Data Not His. Go Straight To Jail' to the entrance of the company's offices in central London on March 20, 2018. The European Parliament on Tuesday invited Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg to speak following revelations that a firm working for Donald Trump's US presidential campaign harvested data on 50 million users. Facebook has faced worldwide criticism over the claims that Cambridge Analytica, the UK data analysis firm hired by Trump's 2016 campaign, harvested and misused data on 50 million members. / AFP PHOTO / Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS (Photo credit should read DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - MARCH 20: In this photo illustration the logo of the strategic communication company 'Cambridge Analytica' is seen on the screen of an iPhone in front of a computer screen showing a Facebook logo on March 20, 2018 in Paris, France. Cambridge Analytica is accused of collecting the personal information of 50 million users of the Facebook social network without their consent and would have used it to develop software to predict and influence voter voting during the campaign American election according to the New York Times and the Guardian. Facebook share price fell by more than 5% Monday shortly after the opening of Wall Street. (Photo Illustration by Chesnot/Getty Images)
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - MARCH 20: A protester called Heiko Khoo sticks posters of Alexander Nix behind bars onto the windows of the offices in a demonstration against Cambridge Analytica on March 20, 2018 in London, England. PHOTOGRAPH BY Matthew Chattle / Barcroft Images (Photo credit should read Matthew Chattle / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
Christopher Wylie, a whistleblower who formerly worked with Cambridge Analytica, the consulting firm that is said to have harvested private information from more than 50 million Facebook users, speaks at the Frontline Club in London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
A man films Christopher Wylie, a whistleblower who formerly worked with Cambridge Analytica, the consulting firm that is said to have harvested private information from more than 50 million Facebook users, for a Facebook live cast as he speaks at the Frontline Club in London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Christopher Wylie, a whistleblower who formerly worked with Cambridge Analytica, the consulting firm that is said to have harvested private information from more than 50 million Facebook users, arrives at the Frontline Club in London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
A man wheels storage crates from the building that houses the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
People walk past the building housing the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
People walk past the building housing the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Alexander Nix, CEO of Cambridge Analytica arrives at the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
A man films Christopher Wylie, a whistleblower who formerly worked with Cambridge Analytica, the consulting firm that is said to have harvested private information from more than 50 million Facebook users, for a Facebook live cast as he speaks at the Frontline Club in London, Britain, March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 19: Traders and financial professionals work ahead of the closing bell on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), March 19, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average dropped over 330 points on Monday. Shares of Facebook dropped nearly 7 percent after news broke that analytics firm Cambridge Analytica was able to collect information on 50 million people's Facebook profiles without their consent. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
PARIS, FRANCE - MARCH 20: In this photo illustration the logo of the strategic communication company 'Cambridge Analytica' is seen on the screen of an iPhone on March 20, 2018 in Paris, France. Cambridge Analytica is accused of collecting the personal information of 50 million users of the Facebook social network without their consent and would have used it to develop software to predict and influence voter voting during the campaign American election according to the New York Times and the Guardian. Facebook share price fell by more than 5% Monday shortly after the opening of Wall Street. (Photo Illustration by Chesnot/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MARCH 19: Traders and financial professionals work ahead of the closing bell on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), March 19, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average dropped over 330 points on Monday. Shares of Facebook dropped nearly 7 percent after news broke that analytics firm Cambridge Analytica was able to collect information on 50 million people's Facebook profiles without their consent. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
HOLBORN, UNITED KINGDOM - MARCH 20: Chief executive of Cambridge Analytica Alexander Nix arrives at the office near Holborn on March 20, 2018 in Holborn, England. PHOTOGRAPH BY Matthew Chattle / Barcroft Images (Photo credit should read Matthew Chattle / Barcroft Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
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Tayler worked at Cambridge Analytica from April 2014. He was the firm's data chief for more than two-and-a-half years, before he became interim CEO after the departure of Alexander Nix.

It means he was a senior figure at the company during the time it was accused of weaponising the data of 87 million Facebook users in the US election — an incident that became an international scandal.

Tayler was also involved in setting up Emerdata, which was seen as a successor to Cambridge Analytica, before it too was consumed by the Facebook scandal.

Tayler left Cambridge Analytica in April, allegedly "to focus on the various technical investigations and inquiries." Cambridge Analytica then liquidated in May, while Emerdata has also been shut down. He has resigned as a director from the latter, according to Companies House filings.

The US Department of Justice and FBI are currently investigating Cambridge Analytica over the data scandal, while the UK's Information Commissioner's Office is also examining the firm as part the biggest probe in its history.

Tayler is now shaking off Cambridge Analytica's tarnished reputation by describing himself as a "data science consultant, data privacy advocate, and tech entrepreneur," on a sparse new website. Business Insider has contacted Tayler for comment.

People can get in touch via a simple web-form, where they can ask him about "speaking events, seminars, and workshops." The site adds that he can offer strategic advice on "data analytics and data regulatory compliance." His LinkedIn profile also has a link to the site.

Records at Companies House show that Tayler has not established a limited company for his consultancy services.

Nix, the former CEO of Cambridge Analytica, defended his staff in evidence to UK lawmakers last week. 

"Cambridge Analytica is a company that is predominantly staffed by very young, very ideological and very talented individuals who come from a broad range of political ideologies and interests," he said.

"They genuinely have been working to understand how they can use data to make the world a better place on many different levels, by contributing to developing communication and how that is used, and also in the social and development sphere, in counter-terrorism and counter-radicalisation."

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