Elon Musk hints at when Tesla will reveal its next SUV (TSLA)


Tesla CEO Elon Musk indicated that the company will unveil its Model Y SUV between late 2018 and mid-2019.

On Twitter, Musk first wrote that Tesla would reveal the Model Y on March 15, but later wrote that he "just made that up, because the Ides of March sounded good."

In another tweet, Musk hinted that Tesla will introduce the vehicle between the end of 2018 and the middle of 2019.

"We could unveil Model Y anytime from late this year to mid next year, so March 15 is about right," he wrote.

Tesla's Model X SUV

29 PHOTOS
Tesla's Model X SUV
See Gallery
Tesla's Model X SUV
Tesla Motors Inc.'s Model X vehicle is unveiled at Tesla's design studio in Hawthorne, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. The Model X, touted by Tesla as faster than Porsche AG's 911 sports car and roomier than Audi AG's Q7 SUV, will be built in 2013 at the company's Fremont, California, plant that starts making the Model S this year. The CUV sports 'Falcon Doors,' dual AWD units, seating for seven and a price tag just under $50,000 after federal tax credits. (Photo by Tim Rue/Corbis via Getty Images)
Tesla Motors Inc.'s Model X vehicle is unveiled at Tesla's design studio in Hawthorne, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. The Model X, touted by Tesla as faster than Porsche AG's 911 sports car and roomier than Audi AG's Q7 SUV, will be built in 2013 at the company's Fremont, California, plant that starts making the Model S this year. The CUV sports 'Falcon Doors,' dual AWD units, seating for seven and a price tag just under $50,000 after federal tax credits. (Photo by Tim Rue/Corbis via Getty Images)
Tesla Motors Inc.'s Model X vehicle is unveiled at Tesla's design studio in Hawthorne, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. The Model X, touted by Tesla as faster than Porsche AG's 911 sports car and roomier than Audi AG's Q7 SUV, will be built in 2013 at the company's Fremont, California, plant that starts making the Model S this year. The CUV sports 'Falcon Doors,' dual AWD units, seating for seven and a price tag just under $50,000 after federal tax credits. (Photo by Tim Rue/Corbis via Getty Images)
Tesla Motors Inc.'s Model X vehicle is unveiled at Tesla's design studio in Hawthorne, California, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. The Model X, touted by Tesla as faster than Porsche AG's 911 sports car and roomier than Audi AG's Q7 SUV, will be built in 2013 at the company's Fremont, California, plant that starts making the Model S this year. The CUV sports 'Falcon Doors,' dual AWD units, seating for seven and a price tag just under $50,000 after federal tax credits. (Photo by Tim Rue/Corbis via Getty Images)
The interior of a Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) is displayed during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The interior of a Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) is displayed during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) is driven during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) is driven during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) is displayed during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
FREMONT, CA - SEPTEMBER 29: Tesla CEO Elon Musk steps out of the new Tesla Model X during an event to launch the company's new crossover SUV on September 29, 2015 in Fremont, California. After several production delays, Elon Mush officially launched the much anticipated Tesla Model X Crossover SUV. The (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
The second row seats of the Tesla Motors Inc. Model X sport utility vehicle (SUV) are seen during an event in Fremont, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 29, 2015. Elon Musk handed over the first six Model X SUVs to owners in California Tuesday night, as Tesla reached a milestone of having two all-electric vehicles in production at the same time. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Tesla Model X sports utility vehicles (SUV) stand on the factory floor ahead of assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An employee looks inside a Tesla Model X sports utility vehicle (SUV) following assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Model X sports utility vehicle (SUV) drives into a rain testing chamber during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Employees fit rear axles to Tesla Model X sports utility vehicles (SUV) as they sit in elevated cradles during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Tesla Model X sports utility vehicles (SUV) stand on hydraulic platforms during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Model X sports utility vehicle (SUV) undergoes wheel alignment checks during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Electrical charging stations stand on the factory floor at the Tesla Motors Inc. electric automobile factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A battery pack stands on a trolley as Tesla Model X sports utility vehicles (SUV) sit in cradles during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The rear gull wing doors of a Tesla Model X sports utility vehicle (SUV) sit open following assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The rear gull wing doors of a Tesla Model X sports utility vehicle (SUV) sit open during assembly for the European market at the Tesla Motors Inc. factory in Tilburg, Netherlands, on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016. A boom in electric vehicles made by the likes of Tesla could erode as much as 10 percent of global gasoline demand by 2035, according to the oil industry consultant Wood Mackenzie Ltd. Photographer: Jasper Juinen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Model X electric SUV is seen charging in Washington, DC, on December 20, 2016. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
The interior information screen is seen on the dashboard of a Tesla Motors Inc. Model X P90D electric sport utility vehicle (SUV) at a Tesla Motors Inc. showroom in London, U.K., on Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. Tesla customers in the U.K. may find their Christmas cash goes a little further than expected after the U.S. electric-auto manufacturer's plans to raise prices 5 percent in the U.K. have been put off until Jan. 15 from the original beginning-of-the-year deadline. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Motors Inc. Model X P90D electric sport utility vehicle (SUV) stands on display at a Tesla Motors Inc. showroom in London, U.K., on Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017. Tesla customers in the U.K. may find their Christmas cash goes a little further than expected after the U.S. electric-auto manufacturer's plans to raise prices 5 percent in the U.K. have been put off until Jan. 15 from the original beginning-of-the-year deadline. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Tesla Inc. Model X P100D sports utility vehicles (SUV) sit on display at the company's new showroom in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The Meatpacking District location, which opens to the public at 11 a.m. Friday, lets customers for the first time explore energy offerings, configure cars and place orders all under one roof. Photographer: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Inc. Model X P100D sports utility vehicle (SUV) sits on display at the company's new showroom in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The Meatpacking District location, which opens to the public at 11 a.m. Friday, lets customers for the first time explore energy offerings, configure cars and place orders all under one roof. Photographer: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The interior of a Tesla Inc. Model X P100D sports utility vehicle (SUV) is seen at the company's new showroom in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The Meatpacking District location, which opens to the public at 11 a.m. Friday, lets customers for the first time explore energy offerings, configure cars and place orders all under one roof. Photographer: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Tesla Inc. Model X P100D sports utility vehicle (SUV), left, sits on display at the company's new showroom in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The Meatpacking District location, which opens to the public at 11 a.m. Friday, lets customers for the first time explore energy offerings, configure cars and place orders all under one roof. Photographer: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The front trunk space of a Tesla Inc. Model X P100D sports utility vehicle (SUV) is seen at the company's new showroom in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The Meatpacking District location, which opens to the public at 11 a.m. Friday, lets customers for the first time explore energy offerings, configure cars and place orders all under one roof. Photographer: Mark Kauzlarich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The Model Y will be a crossover SUV that shares elements of the platform for Tesla's Model 3 sedan. During the company's first-quarter earnings call, Musk said the Model Y will transform Tesla's manufacturing process.  

"I think Model Y is going to be a manufacturing revolution," Musk said. "It will be, I think, incredible from a manufacturing standpoint because we do not want to go through this pain again."

During the call, Musk said Tesla will begin producing the Model Y in about 24 months.

One week after the call, Tesla released a video that showed small portions of a vehicle that was covered by a sheet. Some have speculated that vehicle is the Model Y.

When Tesla starts to produce the Model Y, the company will try to avoid the production bottlenecks and delays that plagued the Model 3's rollout.

Since the Model 3 was introduced in July, Tesla has struggled to ramp up production for the vehicle. Musk had said the company would be making 5,000 Model 3s per week by the end of 2017, but the company made just 2,425 during the fourth quarter.

RELATED: Tesla's first electric semi

13 PHOTOS
Tesla's first electric semi
See Gallery
Tesla's first electric semi
Tesla's new electric semi truck is unveiled during a presentation in Hawthorne, California, U.S., November 16, 2017. REUTERS/Alexandria Sage
Tesla CEO Elon Musk shows off the Tesla Semi as he unveils the company's new electric semi truck during an presentation in Hawthorne, California, U.S., November 16, 2017. REUTERS/Alexandria Sage TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Tesla's new electric semi truck is unveiled during a presentation in Hawthorne, California, U.S., November 16, 2017. REUTERS/Alexandria Sage TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Tesla's new electric semi truck is unveiled during a presentation in Hawthorne, California, U.S., November 16, 2017. REUTERS/Alexandria Sage
Tesla's new electric semi truck is unveiled during a presentation in Hawthorne, California, U.S., November 16, 2017. REUTERS/Alexandria Sage
Tesla CEO Elon Musk shows off the Tesla Semi as he unveils the company's new electric semi truck during a presentation in Hawthorne, California, U.S., November 16, 2017. REUTERS/Alexandria Sage
Tesla Chairman and CEO Elon Musk unveils the new 'Semi' electric Truck to buyers and journalists on November 16, 2017 in Hawthorne, California, near Los Angeles. / AFP PHOTO / Veronique DUPONT (Photo credit should read VERONIQUE DUPONT/AFP/Getty Images)
Tesla Chairman and CEO Elon Musk unveils the new 'Semi' electric Truck for buyers and journalists on November 16, 2017 in Hawthorne, California, near Los Angeles. / AFP PHOTO / Veronique DUPONT (Photo credit should read VERONIQUE DUPONT/AFP/Getty Images)
Tesla Chairman and CEO Elon Musk steps out of the new 'Semi' electric Truck during the unveiling for buyers and journalists on November 16, 2017 in Hawthorne, California, near Los Angeles. / AFP PHOTO / Veronique DUPONT (Photo credit should read VERONIQUE DUPONT/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The company made 9,766 Model 3s during the first quarter, but missed its goal of producing 2,500 per week by the end of the quarter, instead making 2,020 Model 3s during the quarter's final week.

In April, Musk said on Twitter that Tesla used too much automation in the Model 3 production process.

"Yes, excessive automation at Tesla was a mistake. To be precise, my mistake. Humans are underrated," he wrote in response to a Wall Street Journal reporter.

More from Business Insider:

Read Full Story