Whole Foods is slammed for 'Yellow Fever' restaurant

  • Whole Foods is facing a backlash on Twitter after a restaurant called Yellow Fever opened in its new 365 store in Long Beach, California. 
  • The restaurant is not owned by Whole Foods. It is an independent company that has partnered up with the grocery chain to open in its store. 
  • The owner of "Yellow Fever," originally from South Korea, told Next Shark that she chose the name because it was "shocking."

Whole Foods' new store opening took an unexpected turn this week.

On Wednesday, the grocery chain opened its new 365 location in Long Beach, California, which included the opening of a new restaurant called "Yellow Fever."

The restaurant is not owned by Whole Foods. It is owned and operated by an independent chain, which has two other locations in California

Some Whole Foods shoppers are up in arms on Twitter, claiming that this is an offensive and racist name, believing it to be part of the Whole Foods empire.

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Whole Foods around the country
A customer enters the Whole Foods Market in Superior, Colorado United States July 26, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Tomatoes are pictured at a Whole Foods store in San Diego, California, U.S., August 28, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Grass-fed beef products are pictured at a Whole Foods Market in Pasadena, California, U.S., July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
Cut vegetables for sale are pictured inside a Whole Foods Market in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S. June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
An organic chicken is seen for sale above an explanation of animal treatment standards at a Whole Foods Market in Medford, Massachusetts, U.S., July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Juice drinks for sale are pictured inside a Whole Foods Market in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S. June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A sign explains animal treatment standards in the meat department at a Whole Foods Market in Medford, Massachusetts, U.S., July 24, 2017. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Hummus for sale is pictured inside a Whole Foods Market in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S. June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Customers walk by the Whole Foods Market in Boulder, Colorado May 10, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
The inside of a Whole Foods Market is pictured in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S. June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A Whole Foods Market is pictured in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S. June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Customers are seen outside a Whole Foods Market in Austin, Texas, U.S. December 14, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammad Khursheed
The inside of a Whole Foods Market is pictured in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S. June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Jeff Turnas, President of 365 by Whole Foods Market, walks through a 365 by Whole Foods Market grocery store ahead of its opening day in Los Angeles, U.S., May 24, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
The salad bar is pictured at a 365 by Whole Foods Market grocery store ahead of its opening day in Los Angeles, U.S., May 24, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
An employee checks packaged meat at a 365 by Whole Foods Market grocery store ahead of its opening day in Los Angeles, U.S., May 24, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
Express cashier kiosks are pictured at a 365 by Whole Foods Market grocery store ahead of its opening day in Los Angeles, U.S., May 24, 2016. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni
Customers check out at a Whole Foods Market in New York City, U.S., February 7, 2017. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
The inside of a Whole Foods Market is pictured in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York, U.S. June 16, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
A view of fruit and vegetables in a Whole Foods Market shop in London.
A view of cheese in a Whole Foods Market shop in London.
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Whole Foods did not respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

"Gosh. Nothing like a racist meal that might *also* give you a horrific disease," one Twitter user wrote. 

The owner of Yellow Fever, who is originally from South Korea, explained how she came up with the name in an interview Next Shark last year:

“When we finally came up with the concept, all the names we thought of just plain sucked. Buzzwords like ‘traditional’, ‘bamboo’, ‘lotus’, and ‘golden’ weren’t memorable," she said. 

“One night, we just said ‘Yellow Fever!’ and it worked. It’s tongue-in-cheek, kind of shocking, and it’s not exclusive — you can fit all Asian cultures under one roof with a name like this. We just decided to go for it," she added. 

Yellow Fever did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

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