Poll: Fewer than 50 percent of Americans say they’re paying too much in income tax

For the first time since 2012, fewer than half of Americans say they’re paying too much in income tax. 

That’s according to a Gallup poll, which asked 1,014 adults to weigh in on the matter. Only 45 percent of respondents said their taxes were too high, compared to 51 percent last year. 

“The latest decline in Americans’ belief that their taxes are too high mostly results from fewer Republicans holding this view,” notes Gallup. 

From last year to this one, the group’s complaints about high taxes dropped from 62 percent to 45 percent. 

RELATED: 5 states residents are fleeing to avoid tax rates

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5 states residents are fleeing to avoid tax rates
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5 states residents are fleeing to avoid tax rates

#1: California
Moving to: Nevada

Nevada does not have a state income tax on individuals or business entities, while California tacks on a whopping 13.3 percent income tax rate to residents.

Place to live: Clear Creek Tahoe
Private residential community located on the eastern slope of the Carson Range in Western Nevada, set on 2,136 acres bordering 6 million acres of national forest. 

#2: Minnesota

Moving to: South Dakota

Minnesota's income tax rates range from 5.35 percent to 9.85 percent while South Dakota's does not have an income tax rate.

Place to live: Prairie Hills
Luxury community in Sioux Falls, South Dakota

#3: Oregon

Moving to: Washington

Oregon's income tax rate is 9.9 percent, Washington has no income tax.

Place to live: Aldarra Golf Club
Private, membership-only golf community east of Seattle.  

#4: Arkansas

Moving to: Texas

Arkansas has an income tax rate of 6.6 percent, Texas has no income tax.

Place to live: Avilla
Luxury living community in Plano, Texas.

#5: Georgia

Moving to: Florida

Georgia has an income tax rate of 6.6 percent, Florida has no income tax rate.

Place to live: Grand Haven
Golf community seated on a 4,000-acre nature preserve on the Intracoastal Waterway

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According to Gallup, “There has been no meaningful change in the percentages of Independents and Democrats saying their taxes are too high.” 

Republicans also expressed a fondness for President Trump’s new tax laws, with 78 percent saying they approve. 

That said, only 18 percent of respondents said their taxes have gone down since the new rules were instituted, and 56 percent replied that they were not yet sure what impact they will have. 

The poll was conducted between April 2 and April 11.

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