Trump reportedly wants Amazon to increase how much it pays the US Post Office for shipping

  • President Donald Trump has circled back to his criticism of Amazon in recent weeks, tweeting that he wanted Amazon to stop using the US Post Office "as their Delivery Boy."
  • He argues that the way it currently works costs the USPS "a fortune" and allows the e-commerce giant to avoid paying its fair share of taxes.
  • Trump reportedly wants Amazon to pay more in shipping costs to the USPS, according to a recent report by Vanity Fair's Gabriel Sherman.

President Donald Trump wants Amazon to increase the amount it pays to the US Postal System for its shipping needs instead of using it "as their Delivery Boy," according to a recent report from Vanity Fair's Gabriel Sherman.

Trump has reignited his criticism campaign against Jeff Bezos and Amazon in recent weeks, taking to Twitter to argue that the e-commerce giant takes advantage of the USPS' delivery rounds by mixing its packages in with the rest. He's also said that Amazon doesn't pay its fair share in taxes, and according to Vanity Fair, he wants Amazon to pay the USPS more in shipping costs.

RELATED: Dow has volatile day on April 2 as Trump slams Amazon

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Dow has volatile day on April 2 as Trump slams Amazon
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 2: A trader works on the floor on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) ahead of the closing bell, April 2, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average was down nearly 450 points at the close on Monday afternoon. After several Twitter attacks from President Trump, Amazon stocks continued to fall. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 02: A trader pauses outside of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on April 2, 2018 in New York City. In afternoon trading the Dow dropped over 700 points on Monday as global investors fear another trade war with China. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 2: A trader works on the floor on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) ahead of the closing bell, April 2, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average was down nearly 450 points at the close on Monday afternoon. After several Twitter attacks from President Trump, Amazon stocks continued to fall. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 2: A trader works on the floor on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) ahead of the closing bell, April 2, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average was down nearly 450 points at the close on Monday afternoon. After several Twitter attacks from President Trump, Amazon stocks continued to fall. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 2: Traders and financial professionals work on the floor on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) ahead of the closing bell, April 2, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average was down nearly 450 points at the close on Monday afternoon. After several Twitter attacks from President Trump, Amazon stocks continued to fall. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 2: Traders and financial professionals work on the floor on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) ahead of the closing bell, April 2, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average was down nearly 450 points at the close on Monday afternoon. After several Twitter attacks from President Trump, Amazon stocks continued to fall. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 2: A trader works on the floor on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) ahead of the closing bell, April 2, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average was down nearly 450 points at the close on Monday afternoon. After several Twitter attacks from President Trump, Amazon stocks continued to fall. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 2: A trader works on the floor on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) ahead of the closing bell, April 2, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average was down nearly 450 points at the close on Monday afternoon. After several Twitter attacks from President Trump, Amazon stocks continued to fall. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 2: A trader works on the floor on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) ahead of the closing bell, April 2, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average was down nearly 450 points at the close on Monday afternoon. After several Twitter attacks from President Trump, Amazon stocks continued to fall. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 2: A trader works on the floor on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) ahead of the closing bell, April 2, 2018 in New York City. The Dow Jones industrial average was down nearly 450 points at the close on Monday afternoon. After several Twitter attacks from President Trump, Amazon stocks continued to fall. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
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This would effectively solve two issues Trump has with Amazon: That the company doesn't pay its fair share of taxes, and that the USPS actually loses "a fortune" because of its deliveries, as he tweeted on Monday:

Trump doesn't seem interested in the counter-argument some have shared that Amazon might have helped reinvigorate the postal service after it lost some steam due to e-mail. One of the people arguing that point was Trump's top economic advisor Gary Cohn, who no longer serves the President.

White House advisers are now encouraging Trump to cancel Amazon's cloud computing services contract with the Pentagon or to push attorneys in red states to look into Amazon's practices, according to Vanity Fair. There have been attempts to push for legislation that would modify postmasters' schedules, forcing online retailers to pay more shipping costs, but that hasn't gone past Congress.

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