A pet-food company is pulling commercials from a Fox News show after the host mocked a Parkland shooting survivor

  • Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg organized a boycott campaign against companies that run ads on Laura Ingraham's Fox News show. 
  • Ingraham posted a tweet on Wednesday mocking Hogg for "whining" about not being accepted into colleges he applied to. 
  • Pet-food brand Nutrish became the first company to publicly discuss plans to pull its ads from Ingraham's program on Thursday morning. 


A pet-food company is pulling its ads from Laura Ingraham's show after a Parkland shooting survivor called for a boycott against brands that advertise on the host's Fox News program. 

On Wednesday morning, Ingraham tweeted a link to an article about David Hogg being rejected from four colleges. In the tweet, Ingraham says that Hogg "whines" about being rejected. 

Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg:

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Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg
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Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg
David Hogg, a student and shooting survivor from the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, addresses the conclusion of the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, thrusts his fist in the air as he speaks during the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, speaks as students and gun control advocates hold the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, speaks as students and gun control advocates hold the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
David Hogg, a student at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of a February mass shooting which left 17 people dead in Parkland, Florida, thrusts his fist in the air as he speaks during the "March for Our Lives" event demanding gun control after recent school shootings at a rally in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
David Hogg, a senior from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, speaks during a rally with Thurgood Marshall Academy students in advance of Saturday's March for Our Lives event in Washington, U.S. March 22, 2018. REUTERS/Eric Thayer
Emma Gonzalez (L), David Hogg (C) and Cameron Kasky, survivors of the February mass shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, pause for a moment of silence for the victims of the shooting at Great Mills High School in Maryland, before discussing their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Emma Gonzalez (L) and David Hogg, survivors of the February mass shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, discuss their "#NeverAgain" push to end school shootings at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S., March 20, 2018. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
David Hogg, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, speaks at a rally calling for more gun control three days after the shooting at his school, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S. February 17, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Marjory Stoneman Douglas student David Hogg speaks during March for Our Lives to demand stricter gun control laws on Saturday, March 24, 2018, in Washington, D.C. (Mike Stocker/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 24: Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student David Hogg speaks onstage at March For Our Lives on March 24, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for March For Our Lives)
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 23: Dan Rather hosts a SiriusXM Roundtable Special Event with Parkland, Florida, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Students and activists Emma Gonzalez, David Hogg (pictured), Cameron Kasky, Alex Wind, and Jaclyn Corin at SiriusXM Studio on March 23, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Larry French/Getty Images for SiriusXM)
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Hogg responded to Ingraham's tweet later on Wednesday. 

"Soooo @IngrahamAngle what are your biggest advertisers ... Asking for a friend," Hogg tweeted, adding the hashtag #BoycottIngramAdverts.

Hogg later tweeted a list of companies, including Nutrish, AT&T, and Hulu, that he said were advertisers for the show. (It was not immediately clear whether they were currently advertisers.)

On Thursday morning, Nutrish tweeted that the pet-food company is "in the process of removing our ads from Laura Ingraham’s program."

Nutrish

Twitter

Nutrish is the first — and so far, only — company to respond to Hogg's call to boycott companies that advertise on Ingraham's show. 

Hogg has emerged as one of the leaders in the effort to promote gun-regulation legislation following the February 14 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that left 17 people dead. 

Hogg and other survivors of the shooting at the Parkland, Florida high school organized a boycott campaign in February against companies that offer discounts to National Rifle Association members. NRA members are offered discounts and other deals as part of their belonging to the gun-rights organization.

More than a dozen companies, including Delta, United Airlines, Hertz, and MetLife, cut ties with the NRA following the gun-control advocates' boycott efforts. 

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SEE ALSO: Here are all the brands that have cut ties with the NRA following gun-control activists' boycotts

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