Elon Musk pulls Tesla, SpaceX Facebook pages in nod to #DeleteFacebook

Elon Musk has joined the #DeleteFacebook movement, and we can safely assume Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg does not “like” it.

Following a tweetstorm Friday, Musk proceeded to remove the official pages for SpaceX and Tesla from the social media platform, each of which had about 2.6 million followers and pretty engaged audiences.

Not done there, Musk also pulled his own personal Facebook page and that of Tesla-owned SolarCity as well. 

RELATED: Facebook security chief Alex Stamos leaves the company amid scandal:

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Facebook security chief Alex Stamos
Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos gives a keynote address during the Black Hat information security conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. July 26, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Marcus TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos gives a keynote address during the Black Hat information security conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. July 26, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos gives a keynote address during the Black Hat information security conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. July 26, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos gives a keynote address during the Black Hat information security conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. July 26, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos talks about security in the cloud as gives a keynote address during the Black Hat information security conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. July 26, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos talks about the Internet Defense Prize as he gives a keynote address during the Black Hat information security conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. July 26, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos gives a keynote address during the Black Hat information security conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. July 26, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos gives a keynote address during the Black Hat information security conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. July 26, 2017. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
Alex Stamos, Chief Security Officer for Facebook, speaks at the NYU Center for Cyber Security in Brooklyn, New York New York March 7, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid/File Photo
Alex Stamos, Chief Security Officer for Facebook, speaks at the NYU Center for Cyber Security in the Brooklyn borough of New York March 7, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos is leaving Facebook over disinformation drama https://t.co/LUXiImuYIX https://t.co/9qxLQ8Uuv7
stamos peacin’ out https://t.co/SIyfo4Y4NS https://t.co/97IC6FkxpD
Facebook’s high-profile head of security Alex Stamos is leaving the company amid a string of scandals $FB… https://t.co/PvyTRJthh1
Alex Stamos, Facebook's chief security officer, says he's still "fully engaged" in his work at Facebook following r… https://t.co/FJn5r6RH6I
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The actions were well-received on Twitter, where the multibillionaire also sarcastically called out the speaker-manufacturing company Sonos, which pledged Friday to pull its ads from Facebook and other digital companies ― but only for a week.

Brian Acton, co-founder of the now-Facebook-owned messaging service WhatsApp (and no friend of Facebook), endorsed Musk’s digital tirade with the hashtag #DeleteFacebook, to which Musk responded, “What’s Facebook?”

As other followers encouraged him to wipe more and more of his footprint from the site, he happily obliged: 

Musk followed through on his promises. Soon after making the statements, all of the pages disappeared from Facebook. In their place, only an error message remained: “Sorry, this content isn’t available right now.”

While his Facebook presence wasn’t worth a second thought, Musk drew the line at deleting his Instagram account, a Facebook-owned platform where he shares updates with just under 7 million followers. 

“Instagram’s probably ok [in my opinion], so long as it stays fairly independent,” he explained on Twitter. He also cautioned followers from blowing the Facebook deletions out of proportion.

“I don’t use [Facebook] & never have, so don’t think I’m some kind of martyr or my companies are taking a huge blow,” Musk said. “Also, we don’t advertise or pay for endorsements, so … don’t care.”

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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