10 cities where taxpayers receive the fattest refund checks

Chances are you’ll receive a tax refund from Uncle Sam this year — 78 percent of taxpayers get one, a recent MagnifyMoney analysis found.

As for the size of your refund, where you lives turns out to be one of the many influential factors. The average refund across the 100 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. is $3,052. But for folks in Fort Myers, Florida, it’s $3,799.

MagnifyMoney arrived at these figures by examining IRS data for those 100 metro areas. That data came from returns filed in 2012 through 2016.

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Based on that, the 10 metro areas where taxpayers get the fattest refund checks are:

  1. Fort Myers, Florida: Average refund is $3,799
  2. Miami: $3,706
  3. McAllen, Texas: $3,666
  4. New York City: $3,664
  5. Houston: $3,601
  6. San Francisco: $3,466
  7. Corpus Christi, Texas: $3,453
  8. Dallas: $3,329
  9. Memphis, Tennessee: $3,254
  10. Lafayette, Louisiana: $3,253

While this may make San Francisco seem like a great place to live, that may be true only for residents who get refunds. For residents of this California metro who owe taxes to Uncle Sam, the average amount owed is $7,226 — the highest amount of all 100 metro areas.

That amount represents a relatively small portion of San Franciscans’ income, however: 7 percent, which MagnifyMoney found is about the same as the national average.

RELATED: Check out the states where Americans pay the highest and lowest state income taxes:

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States where Americans pay the highest in state income taxes
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States where Americans pay the highest in state income taxes

California

State income tax: 1% to 13.3% 

Maine

State income tax: 5.8% to 10.15%

Oregon

State income tax: 5% to 9.9%

Minnesota

State income tax: 5.35% to 9.85%

Iowa

State income tax: 0.36% to 8.98%

New Jersey

State income tax: 1.4% to 8.97%

Vermont

State income tax: 3.55% to 8.95%

Washington, DC

State income tax: 4% to 8.95%

New York

State income tax: 4% to 8.82%

Hawaii

State income tax: 1.4% to 8.25%

Wisconsin

State income tax: 4% to 7.65%

Idaho

State income tax: 1.6% to 7.4%

South Carolina

State income tax: 0% to 7%

Connecticut

State income tax: 3% to 6.99%

Arkansas

State income tax: 0.9% to 6.9%

Montana

State income tax: 1% to 6.9%

Nebraska

State income tax: 2.46% to 6.84%

Delaware

State income tax: 2.2% to 6.6%

West Virginia

State income tax: 3% to 6.5%

Georgia

State income tax: 1% to 6%

Kentucky

State income tax: 2% to 6%

Louisiana

State income tax: 2% to 6%

Missouri

State income tax: 1.5% to 6%

Rhode Island

State income tax: 3.75% to 5.99%

Maryland

State income tax: 2% to 5.75%

North Carolina

State income tax: 5.75%

Virginia

State income tax: 2% to 5.75%

Oklahoma

State income tax: 0.5% to 5.25%

Massachusetts

State income tax: 5.1%

Alabama

State income tax: 2% to 5%

Mississippi

State income tax: 3% to 5%

Utah

State income tax: 5%

Ohio

State income tax: 0.495% to 4.997%

New Mexico

State income tax: 1.7% to 4.9%

Colorado

State income tax: 4.63%

Kansas

State income tax: 2.7% to 4.6%

Arizona

State income tax: 2.59% to 4.54%

Michigan

State income tax: 4.25%

Illinois

State income tax: 3.75%

Indiana

State income tax: 3.3%

Pennsylvania

State income tax: 3.07%

North Dakota

State income tax: 1.1% to 2.9%

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It’s in the low-income metro of McAllen, Texas, where folks who owe money to the IRS owe the most relative to their income — 16 percent.

Lowering your own tax bill

If you’ve already filed your taxes this year and got or will get a refund, skip on over to “Tax Hacks 2018: How Not to Blow Your Tax Refund.” It will help you make the most of your refund.

If you have yet to file, it’s not too late to ensure you get the largest possible refund. You need not move to Fort Myers to accomplish this.

So, what’s your take on this news? Share your thoughts with us by commenting below or over on our Facebook page.

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