Coca-Cola is being slammed for its massive solution to the 'plastics epidemic' as critics call for a world where its top product is extinct

  • Coca-Cola announced on Friday that for every bottle it sells, it will recycle the equivalent number of bottles. 
  • Greenpeace slammed Coca-Cola for focusing on recycling, instead of making moves to decrease its use of single-serve plastic bottles. 
  • Coca-Cola's CEO said that if Coke can manage to recycle the equivalent of 100% of its packaging, "there's no such thing as a single-use bottle." 

Coca-Cola announced a massive recycling effort on Friday. 

The beverage giant has committed to collecting and recycling the equivalent of 100% of its bottles, cans, and other packaging by 2030.

"If left unchecked, plastic waste will slowly choke our oceans and waterways," Coca-Cola's CEO and president James Quincey wrote in an op-ed published on the company's website on Friday. 

"The world’s packaging problem is a symptom of a more serious condition," Quincey writes. "We're using up our earth as if there’s another one on the shelf just waiting to be opened." 

Coca-Cola's "World Without Waste" initiative aims to achieve the goal of recycling a bottle for every new Coke bottle sold. The company will invest in promoting understanding of recycling, working with local communities to improve recycling infrastructures as well as other nonprofit and corporate partners. 

The company also announced that, by 2030, it aims to make bottles with an average of 50% recycled material.

RELATED: Check out the soda brand throughout the years: 

13 PHOTOS
Coca-Cola through the years, Coke soda
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Coca-Cola through the years, Coke soda
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 1950s: Teenaged girl with bottle of Coca-Cola. (Photo by George Marks/Retrofile/Getty Images)
(GERMANY OUT) *23.03.1912-16.06.1977+Physiker, Raketenforscher, D/USA- Porträt mit Coca-Cola-Flasche- 1963 (Photo by ullstein bild/ullstein bild via Getty Images)
FRANCE - MAY 01: Centenary of Coca-Cola In France In May, 1986. (Photo by Didier CONTANT/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)
BOHOL, PHILIPPINES - 1988/01/01: A lemur clings to a coke bottle. . (Photo by Roland Neveu/LightRocket via Getty Images)
Bottles of Coca-Cola, Tab, and Sprite on the shelf of a grocery store in New York City, USA, September 1988. (Photo by Barbara Alper/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - JANUARY 16: Bottles of Coca-Cola are seen on the shelf at Tower Market January 16, 2004 in San Francisco, California. Coca-Cola is being investigated by U.S. regulators over allegations raised by a former employee that it had inflated its earnings. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - JANUARY 16: Cans of Coca-Cola are seen on the shelf at Tower Market January 16, 2004 in San Francisco, California. Coca-Cola is being investigated by U.S. regulators over allegations raised by a former employee that it had inflated its earnings. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 20: Bottles of Coca-Cola and Diet Coke are displayed on a shelf in an Associated Supermarket in New York Thursday, October 20, 2005. Coca-Cola Co. said third-quarter profit surged 37 percent, the biggest gain in more than a year, as sales rebounded in the U.S. and demand for Powerade sports (Photo by Ramin Talaie/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
PARK RIDGE, IL - NOVEMBER 07: 2-Liter bottles of Vanilla Coke as seen in a grocery store November 7, 2005 in Park Ridge, Illinois. Atlanta-based Coca-Cola Co. has said it plans to discontinue its Vanilla Coke in the US by the end of the year. (Photo by Tim Boyle/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - FEBRUARY 19: A general view of the new aluminum Coca-Cola bottle at Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Fall 2009 Collections at Bryant Park on February 19, 2009 in New York City (Photo by Donald Bowers/Getty Images for The Coca Cola Company)
Bottles of Coca-Cola Co.'s Coke brand soda sit on a shelf behind the bar at Smith & Wollensky in New York, U.S., on Monday, Feb. 22, 2010. Coca-Cola Co., the world's biggest soda maker, agreed to buy the North American operations of bottler Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc., more than six months after PepsiCo Inc. moved to bring its bottlers in-house to cut costs. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LONDON, ENGLAND - MARCH 19: Rita Ora attends photocall to celebrates 100 years of the Coca-Cola Contour Bottle at the Coca-Cola Contour Centenary Bar on March 19, 2015 in London, England. (Photo by Mike Marsland/WireImage)
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However, some critics say that the company isn't doing enough. 

Greenpeace slammed Coca-Cola for focusing on recycling, instead of making moves to decrease its use of single-serve plastic bottles. 

"Instead of focusing on reducing the amount of plastic it produces, the sure fire way to reduce ocean plastic pollution, Coca Cola is trying to offset its huge plastic footprint by investing in a bit more recycling," Louise Edge, Senior Oceans Campaigner for Greenpeace UK, said in a statement. 

"Its plan is full of band-aids and will do very little in the way of making a meaningful impact on the amount of plastic entering our waterways and food chain," Edge continued. "Coke has a long way to go to show it is taking the plastics epidemic seriously."

Quincey dismissed Greenpeace's criticism in a call with reporters. If all bottles are made to be recyclable and then recycled, there is no need to ditch the traditional plastic bottle all together. 

"If we can drive up collection, then we can reuse that and create a circular economy," the CEO said. "I think that's what it's all about — creating this circular economy, and then there's no such thing as a single-use bottle." 

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