Jeff Bezos is donating $33 million to help undocumented immigrants

Jeff Bezos is donating $33 million to a scholarship fund for "dreamers," immigrants who were brought to the United States as children and qualify for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). 

That's right: Amazon's famously un-philanthropic founder is shelling out for undocumented immigrants, The Washington Postreports.  

Bezos will support TheDream.Us, a program that aims to help dreamers who often don't qualify for federal financial aid or in-state tuition, graduate from college.

The program partners with 74 colleges and universities, including George Mason University, University of Washington, Hunter College, Rutgers University, Arizona State University, The City College of New York, and University of California, Santa Cruz.  

RELATED: Check out the CEOs secrets to success:

9 PHOTOS
Jeff Bezos' secrets to success
See Gallery
Jeff Bezos' secrets to success

Use your childhood passions as a starting point

Bezos' passion for science as a child fueled his ability to create, innovate and discover.

It's reported that he invented an electric alarm in his parents' garage to keep his half-siblings out of his room. 

Photo credit: Getty

Remember where you came from

Bezos used to spend his summers working on his grandfather's cattle farm. It's helped keep Bezos humble, and serves as a reminder to always work hard.

Photo credit: Getty

Be prepared for ideas to strike you at any time

Bezos wrote down his business plan on a car ride from NY to Seattle.

Photo credit: Getty

Be open to rebranding

Bezos originally wanted to call Amazon "Cadabra" but changed his mind when potential customers were mispronouncing and mishearing the name. 

Another former name, "Relentless," still redirects its URL to Amazon today.

Photo credit: Shutterstock

Abide by the "Two Pizza Rule"

Bezo's golden rule: In order to have a successful business venture, one should form small teams consisting of the number of people it would take to finish two pizzas.

Photo credit: Getty

Don't think that you're immune to failure

Amazon.com crashed for 40 minutes in 2013, costing the company $4.8M. 

Photo credit: Getty

Never stop expanding 

Since Amazon has launched, the company has made several million-dollar acquisitions, such as Zappos, IMDB and The Washington Post.

Bezos also founded a space travel company called Blue Origin in 2000 and is currently chairing the construction of  a 10,000 year clock in Texas.

Photo credit: Shutterstock

Train your employees for success, no matter where they go

Amazon employees leave the company skilled and ready to blaze trails of their own. Former employees include Jason Kilar (founder of Hulu and Vessel) and Charlie Cheever (founder of Quora).

Photo credit: Getty

Don't limit yourself to one specialty 

Amazon started solely as an e-book seller. The company now sells goods across over 15 categories.

Photo credit: AOL

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Bezos' grant is the largest in the organization's history. TheDream.Us claimed in a statement that the funds would give 1,000 undocumented immigrants with DACA status the opportunity to attend college. 

Dreamers who are enrolled in college under TheDream.US receive $33,000 in scholarship aid over four years. 2,850 are currently enrolled. 

Amazon did not immediately respond to a request for comment. 

Despite Bezos' lack of philanthropic direction in the past, the move isn't altogether surprising. Bezos permanently surpassed Microsoft cofounder Bill Gates to become the world's richest person in October, and was named the richest person of all time Tuesday. 

With this new position may come increased public scrutiny towards Bezos' giving, or lack thereof, as it did for Bill Gates when he ascended to the mantle. While Gates didn't begin to build the Bill & Melinda Gates foundation until after he stepped down as Microsoft's CEO, it's possible Bezos could step in earlier — he already sits on the board of the Bezos Family Foundation, which his parents, Jackie and Mike Bezos, run. 

Additionally, the cause, for Bezos, is personal. 

"My dad came to the U.S. when he was 16 as part of Operation Pedro Ban," Bezos said in a statement. 

“He landed in this country alone and unable to speak English. With a lot of grit and determination – and the help of some remarkable organizations in Delaware – my dad became an outstanding citizen, and he continues to give back to the country that he feels blessed him in so many ways.”

Read Full Story