Disney heiress posts blistering video about the GOP tax bill

Abigail Disney, the granddaughter of Walt Disney Company co-founder Roy O. Disney, wants you to be infuriated about the Republican tax bill.

She explains why in a powerful NowThis video on Wednesday, pointing out that the legislation means a “very fat tax cut” for her on income she “did not do anything to earn.”

“This bill will give me this tax cut while also killing health insurance for over 13 million people,” Disney said. “It will let me pass over $20 million to my children, tax-free. And all my friends with private jets? They get a tax cut too.”

14 PHOTOS
Trump and Republicans celebrate passage of sweeping tax overhaul legislation
See Gallery
Trump and Republicans celebrate passage of sweeping tax overhaul legislation

U.S. President Donald Trump celebrates with Vice President Mike Pence and Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

U.S. President Donald Trump listens to Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-UT) as they celebrate with Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin stands with Chairman on the National Economic Advisory Gary Cohn and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross before President Donald Trump celebrated with Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks flanked by Vice President Mike Pence, U.S. Rep Don Young, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, U.S. Senator Dean Heller and Senator Tim Scott as he celebrates with Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Ivanka Trump talks with attendees at a White House event after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) and Sen. Dean Heller (R-NV) applaud U.S. President Donald Trump, as they celebrate passage of sweeping tax overhaul legislation on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

U.S. President Donald Trump celebrates with Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

U.S. Rep. John Culberson of Texas gives a thumbs up to U.S. President Donald Trump (bottom) as he stands with fellow Republican members of Congress as he celebrates after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

U.S. President Donald Trump celebrates with Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

U.S. President Donald Trump arrives prior to celebrating with Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

U.S. President Donald Trump celebrates with Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

U.S. President Donald Trump celebrates with Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation, on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

U.S. President Donald Trump arrives with Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan prior to celebrating with Congressional Republicans after the U.S. Congress passed sweeping tax overhaul legislation on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S., December 20, 2017.

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Disney fears that the idea of social mobility, that kids from a poor family can achieve the American dream — as her grandfather Roy and great-uncle Walt, did — is quickly becoming unrealistic.

“But I will be able to stay comfortably right where I am,” she said. “Does that strike you as fair?”

Disney also references President Donald Trump’s campaign promise to “drain the swamp.”

“Given how this bill was written, I think it’s looking a lot like a nightmare from ‘Pirates of the Caribbean,’” she said. “Have I made you angry yet? I really hope I’ve made you angry. You should be. No one who votes for this tax bill will be voting with your life in mind. But you will pay for it.”

In a 2015 interview with the Los Angeles Times, Disney, who is a documentary filmmaker, said she has always felt like a rebel in her conservative family. When she attended Columbia University, she recalled being so anxious about her peers viewing her as a snob that she had a cab drop her off blocks from school. In 2014, when Meryl Streep called Walt Disney a “bigot,” his grandniece publicly agreed by posting on Facebook how much she loved the actress’s remarks.

“Anti-Semite? Check,” she wrote. “Misogynist? OF COURSE!! Racist? C’mon…”

14 PHOTOS
Walt Disney over the years
See Gallery
Walt Disney over the years
UNSPECIFIED - NOVEMBER 27: Walt Disney's father and mother late 19th century (Photo by Apic/Getty Images)
Actor Leslie Howard and producer Walt Disney shake hands after playing in a polo match together.
(Original Caption) Walt Disney (1901-1966), famed orignator of full-length animated motion pictures, at work at his drawing board.
(Original Caption) Portrait of Walter Elias Disney (1901-1966), originator of the vast Disney empire consisting of theme parks, cartoons, and movies. Disney is waving and smiling for the camera in this 3/4 length photograph.
Walt Disney with kittens.
(Original Caption) 2/1942: Secretary of Treasury Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Walt Disney, Assistant Secretary of Treasury, John L. Sullivan, Assistant to the Secretary George Buffington, Disney Artist Joseph Grant, and Disney writer Richard Huemer look over Disney's sketches for 'The New Spirit,' Disney cartoon for the Treasury Department.
(Original Caption) Walt Disney takes an imaginary spin high on an old Eagle racing bike while his daughter, Diane, paces him on an 1870 model tricycle. The bikes are part of a collection in Ford's Edison Museum. Undated photograph.
(Original Caption) Walter E. Disney, famous producer of animated cartoons, is shown with doll replicas of his most famous characters which were responsible for his being conferred an honorary degree of Bachelor of Arts at Harvard University Commencement. President James Bryant Conant made the presentation before 5,800 special guests, alumni, students, faculty and members of the graduating class.
(Original Caption) Walt Disney, creator of Mickey Mouse, with Louis Lumiere, French Grand old man of films, during the former's visit to Paris.
American film producer and creator of Disney World, Walt Disney, holds sheet music with actor Eddy Nelson.
(Original Caption) 1939-Los Angeles, CA- Shirley Temple presents an Academy Award to Walt Disney for his outstanding cartoon, 'Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,' one big statue and seven little ones, at the 11th Annual Academy of Motion picture Arts & Sciences dinner.
(Original Caption) Arriving on the Rex is Walt Disney, creator of Mickey Mouse. Mickey Mouse is the animated cartoon character who cavorts his way over the silver sheet much to the delight of America's younger generation.
(Original Caption) Walt Disney learns to do El Gato, one of the colorful and traditional dances of the Argentine countryside. During the survey trip which Disney and a group of his artists made to South America, they spent many hours studying and recording through sketches and photography, the ins and outs of numerous dances and costumes.
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

In a Nov. 30 op-ed for USA Today also deploring the tax bill, Disney wrote:

“Although I was raised amid privilege and good fortune, I have always been cognizant of income and wealth inequality. It has never sat well with me.”

To hear all of Disney’s comments about the tax bill, check out the full video above.

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.

Tax Breaks and Home Ownership

Home ownership brings with it not only many trips to home improvement stores, but also a slew of tax breaks. It's up to you to take full advantage of the write-offs available to you. Here's what you can and can't deduct.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com

Sending Kids to College

TurboTax can help you take advantage of tax breaks to ease the financial burden of sending kids to college, including tax credits, tuition deductions, tax-free savings and more.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com

Tax Aspects of Home Ownership: Selling a Home

Though most home-sale profit is now tax-free, there are still steps you can take to maximize the tax benefits of selling your home. Learn how to figure your gain, factoring in your basis, home improvements and more.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com

How to Avoid Taxes on Canceled Mortgage Debt

If you lost your principal residence to a foreclosure or short sale, TurboTax can help you deal with the tax implications, including recent tax law changes that can offer some relief.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com
Read Full Story
Your resource on tax filing
Tax season is here! Check out the Tax Center on AOL Finance for all the tips and tools you need to maximize your return.

Want more news like this?

Sign up for Finance Report by AOL and get everything from business news to personal finance tips delivered directly to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.