Tech companies have begun to solve one of their biggest problems — and it starts with the words they use in job postings

  • Tech companies have made a concerted effort to become more equal among men and women in recent years.
  • New data suggests job postings may be a useful tool to accomplish that goal.


Over the past few years, employment rates between men and women at America's largest tech companies have grown more equal. New data suggest subtle language changes in job postings could be a reason why.

Tech companies are notoriously male-dominant, across the board. Non-technical roles, technical roles, and executive roles are all majority-occupied by men.

Salaries of employees at 25 top tech companies:

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Salaries of employees at 25 top tech companies
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Salaries of employees at 25 top tech companies

Google

Average annual bonus: $32,478

Average sign-on bonus: $27,547

Average annual base salary: $136,000

Netflix

Average annual bonus: $0

Average sign-on bonus: $3,520

Average annual base salary: $206,000

Twitter

Average annual bonus: $120

Average sign-on bonus: $26,144

Average annual base salary: $149,000

Apple

Average annual bonus: $20,298

Average sign-on bonus: $27,201

Average annual base salary: $102,000

Facebook

Average annual bonus: $33,225

Average sign-on bonus: $45,708

Average annual base salary: $145,000

Oculus VR

Average annual bonus: $395

Average sign-on bonus: $6,926

Average annual base salary: $119,000

Amazon

Average annual bonus: $24,732

Average sign-on bonus: $41,340

Average annual base salary: $118,000

Square

Average annual bonus: $988

Average sign-on bonus: $17,996

Average annual base salary: $134,000

Uber

Average annual bonus: $31,633

Average sign-on bonus: $1,807

Average annual base salary: $117,000

Pinterest 

Average annual bonus: $4,374

Average sign-on bonus: $33,376

Average annual base salary: $151,000

Tesla

Average annual bonus: $4,779

Average sign-on bonus: $19,447

Average annual base salary: $105,000

UnitedHealth Group

Average annual bonus: $7,280

Average sign-on bonus: $118

Average annual base salary: $87,000

Snap Inc.

Average annual bonus: $10,588

Average sign-on bonus: $23,705

Average annual base salary: $127,000

Hewlett Packard Enterprise Co.

Average annual bonus: $10,756

Average sign-on bonus: $8,265

Average annual base salary: $131,000

CSRA

Average annual bonus: $13,732

Average sign-on bonus: $1,186

Average annual base salary: $100,000

credit: Facebook

Capital One

Average annual bonus: $15,114

Average sign-on bonus: $8,568

Average annual base salary: $107,000

Fitbit

Average annual bonus: $18,069

Average sign-on bonus: $25,459

Average annual base salary: $128,000

Pandora

Average annual bonus: $22,316

Average sign-on bonus: $18,886

Average annual base salary: $109,000

Microsoft 

Average annual bonus: $23,224

Average sign-on bonus: $20,191

Average annual base salary: $179,000

Airbnb

Average annual bonus: $23,250

Average sign-on bonus: $23,250

Average annual base salary: $124,000

Arista Networks

Average annual bonus: $27,497

Average sign-on bonus: $18,652

Average annual base salary: $151,000

credit: Facebook

Linkedin

Average annual bonus: $32,216

Average sign-on bonus: $25,418

Average annual base salary: $149,000

Dropbox

Average annual bonus: $32,707

Average sign-on bonus: $32,833

Average annual base salary: $144,000

VMware

Average annual bonus: $33,145

Average sign-on bonus: $18,851

Average annual base salary: $147,000

Salesforce

Average annual bonus: $39,959

Average sign-on bonus: $28,314

Average annual base salary: $142,000

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As more female employees and news outlets have begun sharing stories of discriminatory practices, many of these companies have taken steps to close the gaps.

On Wednesday, the text-analysis startup Textio published the results of its analysis of 25,000 job postings made by companies such as Twitter, Facebook, Google, Apple, Amazon, and more.

Among the key findings: Companies vary wildly in the language they use in job ads, oftentimes attracting more men or women based solely on their diction.

Amazon, for example, was prone to using words and phrases like "wickedly," "fast-paced environment," and "maniacal." In its report on the findings, Textio coded these terms in blue, signifying they attracted significantly more male applicants.

At Facebook, standout terms included "our family," "ruthlessly," and "storytelling." Only "ruthlessly" was in blue; the other two were in purple, which meant they attracted more female applicants.

It's hard to know whether these companies use gendered language intentionally, but many have taken public stances toward increasing their diversity in recent years.

Taking care to attract different kinds of people by using more precise language may be part of their overall strategy.

Going by the labor force data, Textio's results seem to correlate well with companies becoming more gender-equal among tech workers.

In 2014, Apple's tech workers were 80% male and 20% female. By 2016, that rate had shifted to 77% and 23%. At Google, the rates went from 83% and 17% to 81% and 19%. And at Facebook, it went from 85% and 15% to 83% and 17%.

The rates start skewing the opposite direction for non-tech workers and executive roles, perhaps indicating that the companies have directed their equality efforts in one direction in particular, at the expense of other positions.

But there was a slight overlap in the companies Textio identified as using language appealing to women and tech companies becoming more equal.

Facebook's postings commonly use the female-gendered phrases "our family" and "storytelling," and it's one of the only big tech companies to make a big jump in executive diversity. In 2014, the ratio was 77% male to 23% female; in 2016, it was 73% and 27%.

"Changing the words you use won't change your culture overnight," Textio CEO Kieran Snyder wrote. "But getting consistent and intentional about language does create accountability for teams to aim for the environment that you're all aspiring to  —  and that's the first step to getting there."

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SEE ALSO: Bill Gates and Steve Jobs raised their kids tech-free — and it should've been a red flag

DON'T MISS: An analysis of job postings for Amazon, Facebook, and other tech giants hints at their inner workings

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