Patagonia goes to war against Trump over national monument plans: 'The President Stole Your Land'

  • Clothing company Patagonia has attacked President Donald Trump's decision to drastically reduce the size of two national monuments.
  • It says it plans to sue and is telling visitors to its website: "The President Stole Your Land."


Visitors to Patagonia's website are being greeted with a stark message: "The President Stole Your Land."

The lifestyle clothing company has launched a scathing attack on the Trump administration's decision to drastically reduce the size of two national monuments, and says it plans to sue over what it describes as an "illegal move."

On Monday, it was announced that the Bears Ears National Monument in Utah is being decreased by 85% — the largest-ever reduction of a national monument. The Grand Staircase National Monument is also being reduced.

Trump has framed the move as a response to government overreach: "I have come to Utah to take a very historic action: to reverse federal overreach and restore the rights of this land to your citizens," he said.

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An old barn stands in a residential yard in Blanding, Utah, U.S., October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen
Hundreds of petroglyphs cover Newspaper Rock, in Bears Ears National Monument, Utah, U.S., October 29, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
Comb Wash cuts from north to south through Cedar Mesa in Bears Ears National Monument near Blanding, Utah, U.S., October 27, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
A creek runs through Arch Canyon in Bears Ears National Monument near Blanding, Utah, U.S., October 27, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
A man walks over a natural bridge at Butler Wash in Bears Ears National Monument near Blanding, Utah, U.S., October 27, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
A sign advertises Natural Bridges National Monument on the way into Blanding, Utah, U.S., October 29, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
Rock climber David Rozul makes an ascent in Indian Creek, an area that attracts outdoor recreationists from around the world to Bears Ears National Monument, Utah, U.S., October 29, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
Trick-or-treaters pose for a photograph in Blanding, Utah, U.S., October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen
A sign showing support for Bears Ears National Monument is seen in a front yard in Bluff, Utah, U.S., October 28, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
Kinley Wojcik looks at her phone as she works behind the counter at Higher Grounds Coffee and Soda, the only dedicated coffee shop in Blanding, Utah, U.S., October 30, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
A vehicle displays a sticker opposing the Bears Ears National Monument in Blanding, Utah, U.S., October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
An all-terrain vehicle stands covered up in a front yard in Blanding, Utah, U.S., October 30, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
Tewa Martin and Sylas Burbank, both from Montezuma Creek, sit on a truck before riding in the Bluff Navajo Fair parade in Bluff, Utah, U.S., October 28, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
The moon glows over Indian Creek in the northern portion of Bears Ears National Monument, Utah, U.S., October 29, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
Trick-or-treaters ride horses through the streets in Blanding, Utah, U.S., October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
Ranchers close a gate after collecting cattle near Monticello, Utah, U.S., October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen S
Albert Cly, Jr. poses for a photograph outside his home in Westwater, a small Native American community near Blanding, Utah, U.S., October 31, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
Oil pumpjacks are seen near Aneth, Utah, U.S., October 29, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
Elvira Begay fixes her float before the Bluff Navajo Fair parade in Bluff, Utah, U.S., October 28, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Cullen 
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But some environmental campaigners and brands have reacted with fury. "Americans have overwhelmingly spoken out against the Trump Administration's unprecedented attempt to shut down our national monuments," Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario said in a statement obtained by Ad Age, signaling the company intends to sue.

"We've fought to protect these places since we were founded and now we'll continue that fight in the courts."

Patagonia has previously been vocal in its support for protecting public land, and is now calling on customers to support advocacy groups including Grand Staircase Escalante Partners, Alaska Wilderness League, and Wild Salmon Center.

patagonia trump national monuments bear earsPatagonia.com

"Removing protections for these wild places to open them up for development will not make us energy independent, and history shows that when states control these lands, they are sold to the highest bidder," it says. "This is not a chance we are willing to take."

rei homepage public landsRei

Outdoor brand REI has also updated its website to condemn the decision, writing:

"Today’s decision hurts the people who love these places. Americans enjoy our public lands in every part of the country, irrespective of politics. Not only have hikers, cyclists, climbers and hunters enjoyed national monuments, but economies have been built around them through outfitters, guides and retailers. The $887 billion outdoor recreation economy employs over 7.6 million people in good, sustainable jobs."

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SEE ALSO: Trump is shrinking Bears Ears National Monument by 85% — here's what it looks like

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