Marcus by Goldman Sachs introduces game-changing new lending platform to consumers

Whether you’re eighteen or eighty-three, you’ve probably come to the realization that sometimes things in life just, well, happen.

In a time when consumers are forking over big bucks for "experiences" and must-have purchases in an effort to abide by the "live for now" mentality, savings accounts are nowhere near as bountiful as they once were for younger earners and consumers.

SEE ALSO: Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein says it's too soon for the bank to need a bitcoin plan

Because though you can budget and plan for that dream vacation or new car, you can’t exactly predict events like breaking your arm during an after-work intramural game (those things get intense, don’t roll your eyes!) or a roommate breaking your lease and leaving you with double the rent for an undisclosed period of time.

That’s why so many Americans turn to credit cards for purchases and payments that are out of budget — Which is also why nearly 38 percent of creditworthy Americans are struggling with credit card debt, according to data from Marcus by Goldman Sachs.

Goldman CEO LLoyd Blankfein:

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Goldman Sachs Chief Executive and Chairman Lloyd Blankfein shakes hands with other business leaders as they meet U.S. President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, November 9, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Lloyd Blankfein participates in a panel discussion during the White House Summit on Working Families in Washington June 23, 2014. President Barack Obama, as part of efforts to make the U.S. workplace more accommodating for employees with families, will on Monday direct federal agencies to step up efforts to give workers more leeway in determining their schedules. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT)
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs Group, attends the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos January 25, 2013. REUTERS/Pascal Lauener (SWITZERLAND - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS HEADSHOT)
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and CEO of the Goldman Sachs Group, Inc., takes part in a panel at the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) in New York September 25, 2013. The CGI was created by Bill Clinton in 2005 to gather global leaders to discuss solutions to the world's problems. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS)
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., reacts during a Bloomberg Television interview at the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, on Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017. World leaders, influential executives, bankers and policy makers attend the 47th annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos from Jan. 17 - 20. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., gestures while speaking during a panel session at the 10,000 Small Businesses (1OKSB) Partnership Event at their offices in London, U.K., on Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016. The 'pendulum happily has swung by' the era when people criticized Goldman Sachs executives taking positions in public service, Blankfein said at the event. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., speaks during the New York Times DealBook conference in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016. The event brings together CEOs, leading figures in finance, and experts from diverse industries to assess the challenges and opportunities that will define the deal world of tomorrow. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
DANA POINT, CA - OCTOBER 18: Lloyd Blankfein speaks onstage at the Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit 2016 at Ritz-Carlton Laguna Niguel on October 18, 2016 in Dana Point, California. (Photo by Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Fortune)
Goldman Sachs chairman and CEO Lloyd Blankfein speaks at the inaugural Goldman Sachs 10,000 Women/US State Department Entrepreneurship Program for women in the Middle East and Northern Africa on March 9, 2015 at the State Department in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
US Secretary of State John Kerry (L) shakes hands with Goldman Sachs chairman and CEO Lloyd Blankfein at the inaugural Goldman Sachs 10,000 Women/US State Department Entrepreneurship Program for women in the Middle East and Northern Africa on March 9, 2015 at the State Department in Washington, DC. . AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - FEBRUARY 09: Goldman Sachs Chairman and CEO Lloyd Blankfein (L) stands behind Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) during the graduation ceremony for small business owners from the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program held at the Freedom Tower at Miami Dade College on February 9, 2015 in Miami, Florida. The Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program helps owners in the Greater Miami area by providing them with greater access to business education, financial capital and business support services. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
SQUAWK BOX -- Pictured: Lloyd Blankfein, CEO and Chairman of Goldman Sachs, on January 7, 2015 -- (Photo by: Adam Jeffery/CNBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
Lloyd Blankfein, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., speaks during a panel discussion at a Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses event in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., on Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. Panelists discussed the future of Detroit, the economy and Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program. Photographer: Jeff Kowalsky/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., speaks during a panel discussion at the Center for American Progress (CAP) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2013. The CAP event was titled 'Getting to Results by Investing for Impact.' Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., listens to a question during a news conference after a meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013. The meeting, set up by the Financial Services Forum, a Washington-based trade group representing CEOs for the largest Wall Street banks, marks an effort by the Obama administration to leverage the business community in the continuing debates over how to fund the government and increase the debt- limit. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., speaks during an interview hosted by Politico in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 13, 2013. Blankfein said debate about when the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates may help avoid 'a jarring surprise' to markets. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., listens during an interview hosted by Politico in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 13, 2013. Blankfein said debate about when the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates may help avoid 'a jarring surprise' to markets. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., smiles before speak during the LaGuardia Community College 2013 commencement at the Jacob K. Javits center in New York, U.S., on Thursday, June 6, 2013. Blankfein told the graduating class that associating with ambitious people is one key to success in life. Photographer: Jin Lee/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., speaks during an interview hosted by Politico in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, June 13, 2013. Blankfein said debate about when the Federal Reserve will raise interest rates may help avoid 'a jarring surprise' to markets. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., speaks during an interview at the Investment Company Institute (ICI) general membership meeting in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, May 2, 2013. Blankfein warned that the interest-rate environment has parallels to 1994, when a sudden and sharp increase in rates caught many investors off-guard. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., waits to start a television interview following a meeting with U.S. President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. U.S. Obama urged Congress to postpone automatic spending cuts scheduled to begin March 1 to avoid 'real and lasting impacts' on U.S. economic growth. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., speaks during a Bloomberg Television interview in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013. Blankfein discussed the role of technology in innovation across different industries, the impact of the financial crisis on investment banking, and his plans to remain at with the company. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., arrives to the White House to meet with U.S. President Barack Obama in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2013. U.S. Obama urged Congress to postpone automatic spending cuts scheduled to begin March 1 to avoid 'real and lasting impacts' on U.S. economic growth. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and CEO of The Goldman Sachs Group waits before a meeting with French Finance Minister Pierre Moscovici at the French economy ministry in Paris on November 20, 2012. AFP PHOTO ERIC PIERMONT (Photo credit should read ERIC PIERMONT/AFP/Getty Images)
Lloyd Blankfein, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., speaks at the Canadian Club of Toronto in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012. Blankfein said he would invest in real estate as central banks around the world focus on avoiding deflation. Photographer: Norm Betts/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., left, speaks with David Rubenstein, co-founder of The Carlyle Group LP, during a luncheon with the Economic Club of Washington in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, July 18, 2012. Goldman Sachs, the fifth-biggest U.S. bank by assets, plans to cut $500 million of expenses this year, mostly from compensation, after reporting the lowest first-half revenue and earnings since 2005. Photographer: Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 18: Lloyd Blankfein, Chairman and CEO of the Goldman Sachs Group, listens to his introduction before speaking at the Economic Club of Washington luncheon, on July 18, 2012 in Washington, DC. Mr. Blankfein spoke about global economic issues and the state of job creation in the United States. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
Lloyd C. Blankfein, chairman and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., listens during the Robin Hood Veterans Summit in New York, U.S., on Monday, May 7, 2012. The one-day summit discusses transitioning the country's armed forces personnel back to civilian life. Photographer: Scott Eells/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and chief executive officer of The Goldman Sachs Group Inc., right, talks to Greg Brown, president and chief executive officer of Motorola Solutions Inc., left, at the U.S.-China Business Roundtable at the Chamber of Commerce in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2012. President Barack Obama told Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping that China's growing economic power brings with it responsibility to work toward 'balanced' trade and to recognize the aspirations of all people for greater rights. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON - OCTOBER 04: Chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs Group Lloyd Blankfein attends the Fortune Most Powerful Women summit at Mandarin Oriental Hotel on October 4, 2010 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Time Inc.)
Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein is sworn in prior to testifying before a Senate investigative committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, April 27, 2010. Goldman Sachs denied reaping vast profits from the collapse of the US housing market as its top executive and a star trader faced hostile questions in Congress over the 2008 financial meltdown. AFP PHOTO / Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Lloyd C. Blankfein, chairman and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Group Inc., chats with other attendees prior to a speech by U.S. President Barack Obama speech about financial reform at Cooper Union in New York, U.S., on Thursday, April 22, 2010. Obama called on the financial industry to drop it's 'furious efforts' to fight his regulation plan, saying a failure to impose tougher rules on the market will put the U.S. economic system at risk. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images *** Local Cation *** Lloyd C. Blankfein
NEW YORK - OCTOBER 16: Lloyd Blankfein, Chairman and CEO of Goldman Sach's during Fortune's Andy Serwer interview of Goldman Sachs' Lloyd Blankfein at Bobby Van's Grill on October 16, 2009 in New York City. (Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Time Magazine)
Lloyd Blankfein, Chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs, participates in a panel discussion at the Clinton Global Initiative in New York September 23, 2009. About 1,200 participants including heads of state, business leaders, humanitarians and celebrities will attend the fifth annual Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) which started on Tuesday. REUTERS/Chip East (UNITED STATES POLITICS BUSINESS)
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Life happens, but that doesn’t mean that debt has to happen — and that’s what Marcus by Goldman Sachs is aiming to show through its online lending platform. 

The idea of taking out or applying for a loan can seem like a lengthy, complicated process, especially for younger millennials who are handling their own finances for the very first time.

Marcus offers fixed-rate, no fee personal loans to those with good credit scores (660+).

And yes, you read that correctly — no fees at all.

In fact, Marcus is so dedicated to emphasizing it’s “no-fee” policy that the company has even created an entire campaign surrounding the feature called “Don’t Get Fee-d”.

Watch the witty ‘Don’t Get Fee’d’ video here:

The video depicts unsuspecting customers purchasing slices of pizza, only to find the cashier taking a bite out of their slice and declaring his bite a “fee”, ensuing volatile, cringeworthy and absolutely hilarious reactions from the customers.

But what the new campaign drives home is the idea that a loan is not really a loan when a fee is attached to it — no matter how much you're being lent, your bank is still taking a lump sum out of it in the form of fees.

A complete game-changer in the world of personal loans, Marcus factors out the typically unapproachable and intimidating nature of applying for a loan by offering a streamlined, transparent approach that’s easy to understand regardless of where you fall on the financial spectrum.

Loan options through Marcus range from $3,500 to $30,000, with payment terms extending from 36 to 72 months.

And much like it’s easy-to-remember, casual first name implies (named after Goldman Sachs founder Marcus Goldman), Marcus really is the equivalent of that reliable, good friend of yours that spots you money for something because he knows you’ll pay him back — no strings attached.

And if you ask us, that’s how all loans should be. 

RELATED: The 10 most valuable banks in America

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The most valuable banks in America
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The most valuable banks in America

1. JPMorganChase

Current worth: $2.47 Trillion  

Photo credit: Reuters

5. U.S. Bancorp 

Current worth: $438.5 Billion 

Photo credit: Reuters 

6. PNC Financial 

Current worth: $361.3 Billion 

Photo credit: Reuters 

7. Capital One

Current worth: $339.1 Billion 

Photo credit: Getty

8. BB&T 

Current worth: $221.9 Billion 

Photo credit: Getty

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