MGM's Mandalay Bay is in crisis as hundreds of Las Vegas shooting victims accuse the hotel of missing red flags

  • Hundreds of victims of the Las Vegas shooting are filing lawsuits against the operator of the hotel where the shooter was staying. 
  • The lawsuits argue that the hotel and its parent company should have taken greater security measures. 
  • If the victims win in court, it could completely change how hotels handle security. 

Hundreds of victims of the Las Vegas shooting have filed lawsuits against Mandalay Bay Hotel and Resort and parent company MGM Resorts International.

Several lawsuits — the largest of which was filed on behalf of 450 people — attempt to hold MGM legally liable for the shooting, which killed 58 people and injured hundreds more. Victims are additionally suing shooter Stephen Paddock's estate and concert organizer Live Nation Entertainment Inc., as well as the bump stock manufacturer, in some cases.

The crux of the lawsuits' arguments is that MGM and Mandalay Bay failed to take preventative measures to stop the attack from happening. Plaintiffs argue that staff should have been better trained to spot red flags and monitored Paddock more closely.

In the three days between when Paddock checked into the hotel and when he carried out the shooting, he brought at least 10 suitcases filled with firearms into his room. Police officials said Paddock also constructed an elaborate surveillance system in the hotel, placing two cameras in the hallway outside his suite — one on a service cart — as well as a camera in his door's peephole.

RELATED: An inside look at some of the Las Vegas shooting survivors:

9 PHOTOS
Las Vegas mass shooting survivors
See Gallery
Las Vegas mass shooting survivors
Paola Bautista, 39, from Fontana, California, (R) sits in her hospital bed next to her sister Daisy Bautista at Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center after being shot at the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Braden Matejka, 30, (L) and his girlfriend Amanda Homulos, 23, from British Columbia, Canada sit outside Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center after he was discharged after being shot at the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: Kassidy Owen, 22, left, and Taylor Schmidt, 21, both of Las Vegas, NV, are photographed on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. Owen and Schmidt both survived the mass shooting on Sunday's evening. Sometimes I think it happened then the next second I say did that really happend,' Owen said. 'I keep hearing the shots in my head, people running and hear the ambulances,' she added. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: Veteran Steve Charshafian, 59, speaks about Sunday's night mass shooting and recalls helping wounded people on Wednesday, October 4, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. Charshafian survived the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival shooting with his wife when they hid inside their car. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Aaron Stalker is interviewed outside Dance Dynamics on Wednesday October 04, 2017 in Las Vegas, NV. Stalker helped to evacuate and care for victims during Sunday night's mass shooting at the Route 91 Harvest Festival. Aaron was attending a hockey game when his girlfriend, Stephanie Melanson called him from the concert. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS - OCTOBER 3: Jonathan Smith was shot at least twice while trying to run back and save others in the crowd at the Route 91 Harvest festival in Las Vegas. (Photo by Heather Long/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 03: Brian Hopkins, the lead singer of the band Elvis Monroe, is interviewed by a tv reported on the south end of the Las Vegas Strip on the on October 3, 2017, after the mass shooting that killed 59 people and inured more than 500 people at the Route 91 Harvest Festival near Mandalay Bay on October 1, 2017, in Las Vegas, NV. Hopkins took over 20 people into a freezer near the venue. Hopkins filmed himself during the shooting, still unsure of what the chaos was going on outside in the venue. (Photo by Doug Kranz/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - OCTOBER 2: With the presence of her family, Danny Alegria, from left, Evan Algeria and Lucy Alegria - Carmen Alegria recounts her harrowing experience surviving and escaping the mass shooting that killed 59 and injured more than 525 at the Route 91 Harvest Festival, in Las Vegas, Nevada, on Oct. 2, 2017. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

 

A new decision makes it more likely Mandalay Bay will be held liable

In October, the Nevada Supreme Court found that MGM could be held liable in a 2010 assault on a California couple at one of the company's hotels, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reported. The court ruled that, because there had been similar cases of violence the hotel, the attack was "foreseeable." 

The question of if the Las Vegas shooting was foreseeable is at the center of the Mandalay Bay lawsuits. 

As more mass shootings take place in the US, attorneys may argue that hotels and other venues should see the potential for such a crime and make changes to prevent it, legal experts told Business Insider before any cases were filed. 

"Foreseeability is one of the key components of liability," said Dick Hudak, a managing partner of Resort Security Consulting. 

Heidi Li Feldman, a professor at Georgetown Law School, says it's "entirely feasible" that an attorney would make this argument based on the fact that mass shootings have taken place at other entertainment venues.

"If Congress isn't regulating gun ownership, it is going to be private parties ... who end up regulating their own premises," Feldman said.

The hotel industry currently has no national standards for security, and hotels aren't typically held accountable for guests' behavior. However, if one of the hundreds of victims suing Mandalay Bay wins their case, it could set a new precedent that completely changes how hotels handle security. 

NOW WATCH: We just got a super smart and simple explanation of what a bitcoin fork actually is

More from Business Insider: 
Chipotle is facing a reckoning — and I saw why it may never again be the chain it once was 
'We should expect to see another outbreak': Reports of illnesses from Chipotle are soaring 
The diner who has left waiters thousands of dollars as Tips for Jesus reveals himself to be a millionaire tech exec in the 'PayPal Mafia'

SEE ALSO: The Las Vegas shooting could completely change how hotels think about security

Read Full Story

Can't get enough business news?

Sign up for Finance Report by AOL and get everything from retailer news to the latest IPOs delivered directly to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.