Apple reiterated its commitment to diversity — but it made little progress in the last year and is still predominantly white and male

  • Apple released its latest diversity report Thursday.
  • Among the company's leadership and tech-worker ranks, women made only a slight gain while underrepresented minority groups actually lost ground. 
  • Still, the company noted that half of the people hired overall in the last year were either women or members of such underrepresented groups.


Apple released its latest diversity report on Thursday, showing that, despite its stated commitment to diversifying its workforce, the iPhone maker remains predominately white and male. 

The proportion of women in its leadership ranks only rose slightly in the last year and among its tech workers, didn't change at all. Underrepresented minorities made no gains among Apple's leadership since last year, and actually lost ground among its tech workers. 

Apple CEO TIm Cook through the years:

10 PHOTOS
Tim Cook - Apple CEO
See Gallery
Tim Cook - Apple CEO
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 9: Apple CEO Tim Cook gestures on stage during an Apple special event at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California. Apple Inc. announced the new MacBook as well as more details on the much anticipated Apple Watch, the tech giant's entry into the rapidly growing wearable technology segment as well (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 9: Apple CEO Tim Cook stands in front of an MacBook on display after an Apple special event at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California. Apple Inc. announced the new MacBook as well as more details on the much anticipated Apple Watch, the tech giant's entry into the rapidly growing wearable technology segment as well (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 9: Apple CEO Tim Cook waves from stage after an Apple special event at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California. Apple Inc. announced the new MacBook as well as more details on the much anticipated Apple Watch, the tech giant's entry into the rapidly growing wearable technology segment as well (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images)
Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., right, waves to customers while leaving the sales launch for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus at the Apple Inc. store in Palo Alto, California, U.S., on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Apple Inc.'s stores attracted long lines of shoppers for the debut of the latest iPhones, indicating healthy demand for the bigger-screen smartphones. The larger iPhone 6 Plus is already selling out at some stores across the U.S. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., left, and the band U2 gesture during a product announcement at Flint Center in Cupertino, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. Apple Inc. unveiled redesigned iPhones with bigger screens, overhauling its top-selling product in an event that gives the clearest sign yet of the company's product direction under Cook. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
CUPERTINO, CA - OCTOBER 16: Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an Apple special event on October 16, 2014 in Cupertino, California. Apple unveiled the new iPad Air 2 tablet, iPad Mini 3 and a Retina iMac. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JUNE 02: Apple CEO Tim Cook walks off stage after speaking during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center on June 2, 2014 in San Francisco, California. Tim Cook kicked off the annual WWDC which is typically a showcase for upcoming updates to Apple hardware and software. The conference runs through June 6. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - JANUARY 17: (CHINA OUT) Tim Cook, Chief Executive Officer of Apple Inc., visits a China Mobile shop to celebrate the launch of iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C on China Mobile's fourth generation (4G) network on January 17, 2014 in Beijing, China. Apple Inc. and China Mobile Limited, the world's largest carrier with over 760 million subscribers, signed a deal on December 23, 2013 after six years of negotiations. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., displays the iPad Air for a photograph during a press event at the Yerba Buena Center in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013. Apple Inc. introduced new iPads in time for holiday shoppers, as it battles to stay ahead of rivals in the increasingly crowded market for tablet computers. Photographer: Noah Berger/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Overall at the company, the proportion of women remained unchanged and the percentage of underrepresented minorities barely nudged.

"Meaningful change takes time," the company said in its report. "We’re proud of our accomplishments, but we have much more work to do."

A company representative did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment. 

STOCK PRICE FOR AAPL

Full price information

Worldwide, only 29% of Apple's leadership — a term it didn't define — is female, according to the report. Apple has raised that proportion just one percentage point since 2014, and the increase just happened in the last year.

In terms of ethnic diversity, Apple's leadership ranks also barely changed. Whites constitute 66% of Apple's leadership, down just 1 percentage point from last year. Although the proportion of Asians in its leadership rose from 21% to 23% in the last year, the percentage of blacks, Hispanics and multiracial people didn't change at all.

Apple's leadership page offers a good indication of the company's lack of gender and ethnic diversity at its top. Of the 19 senior executives shown on the page, only five are women,  and just two are black. Among the 11 people in Apple's top executive ranks, only one is a woman, and none are black. 

Apple's tech workforce also has a long ways to go to be truly diverse; currently, it's 52% white and 77% male. Last year it was at 55% white and 77% male. The proportion of underrepresented minorities — blacks, Hispanics, and multiracial people — actually declined in the last year from 18% to 17%. 

The company did have some successes to point to, in terms of diversifying its workforce. Half of the people Apple hired between July 2016 and July 2017 were from groups traditionally underrepresented in the tech industry, including women, blacks and Hispanics, according to the report. It also said that the proportion of workers under 30 who are women or members of underrepresented minority groups were higher than the company's overall average for such groups. 

However, Apple didn't say what kind of jobs it was hiring those members of underrepresented groups to do. Traditionally, the workers in its retail stores have been much more diverse than those in its leadership ranks or among its tech employees. Those retail employees also tend to be paid significantly less than Apple's managers or tech workers. 

NOW WATCH: Here are the most important differences between the iPhone 8 and the iPhone X

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Apple says it has solved its gender pay gap

Read Full Story

Can't get enough business news?

Sign up for Finance Report by AOL and get everything from retailer news to the latest IPOs delivered directly to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.