Las Vegas tourists undaunted after concert shooting

LAS VEGAS — The hearty American consumer appears to have considered the largest mass shooting in modern American history — been saddened by it, and a little worried — and decided not to end a love affair with Las Vegas.

Hotels along the audacious Strip (quietly) acknowledged some cancellations, and some businesses said they saw a slight fall-off in sales in the first three days after Sunday night's attack outside the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. But most customers, merchants and investors appear to think the business of fun and excess is still good business.

Visitors from China, France and Appleton, Wisconsin, continued to gape at the Bellagio’s water show. Lines continued to form at check-in desks up and down Las Vegas Boulevard. Couples in shorts and flip-flops still slurped from their three-foot-tall daiquiri decanters, but now under glowing Jumbotrons that proclaimed “VegasStrong.” And customers filed steadily into giant CVS and Walgreens stores along the Strip, packing out bags full of cigarettes, energy drinks, DayQuil and 12-packs of beer.

Around Las Vegas after the shooting

14 PHOTOS
Around Las Vegas after the shooting
See Gallery
Around Las Vegas after the shooting
Las Vegas Boulevard remains closed near the mass shooing site at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 2, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A man stands next to a bouquet of flowers along a pedestrian walkway looking towards where a mass shooing at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival took place Monday night on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 2, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Law enforcement vehicles gather near one of the entrance points to the concert venue where Sunday night's mass shooting, October 3, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The gunman, identified as Stephen Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada, allegedly opened fire from a room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on the music festival, leaving at least 58 people dead and over 500 injured. According to reports, Paddock killed himself at the scene. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 3: Las Vegas Blvd. remained closed to vehicular traffic near the scene of Sunday night's mass shooting, October 3, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The gunman, identified as Stephen Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada, allegedly opened fire from a room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino on the music festival, leaving at least 58 people dead and over 500 injured. According to reports, Paddock killed himself at the scene. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Las Vegas Boulevard lights-up with with signs for the victims and first responders after a mass shooing at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 2, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman hosts a prayer vigil, in honor of those affected by the shooting on the Las Vegas Strip, in front of Las Vegas City Hall in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 2, 2017. REUTERS/Las Vegas Sun/Steve Marcus
A churches cross is lit by fading daylight as it towers over the scene in front of the stage following a mass shooing at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 2, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
People stand along a pedestrian walkway looking towards where a mass shooing at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival took place last night on the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 2, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Women walk down the Las Vegas strip after roads were closed near the site of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting outside the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 2, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Las Vegas Boulevard lights-up with with signs for the victims and first responders after a mass shooing at the Route 91 Harvest Country Music Festival in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 2, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Las Vegas residents Karen Stevens (L) and husband Mark Stevens attend a candlelight vigil at Las Vegas City Hall October 2, 2017, after a gunman killed at least 58 people and wounded more than 500 others when he opened fire on a country music concert in Las Vegas, Nevada late October 1, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, USA - OCTOBER 02 : Mandalay Hotel is seen after a gunman attack in Las Vegas, NV, United States on October 02, 2017. At least 59 people were killed and more than 527 others wounded at a country music concert in the city of Las Vegas late Sunday night in the mass shooting. A gunman -- identified as Stephen Paddock -- opened fire on more than 10,000 concert-goers at an outdoor venue from across the Mandalay Bay Hotel at around 10.08 p.m. local time (0508GMT Monday), Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lambardo from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD) told reporters. (Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, USA - OCTOBER 02: Police block the roads leading to the Mandalay Hotel (background) and inspect the site after a gunman attack in Las Vegas, NV, United States on October 02, 2017. At least 59 people were killed and more than 527 others wounded at a country music concert in the city of Las Vegas late Sunday night in the mass shooting. A gunman -- identified as Stephen Paddock -- opened fire on more than 10,000 concert-goers at an outdoor venue from across the Mandalay Bay Hotel at around 10.08 p.m. local time (0508GMT Monday), Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lambardo from the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD) told reporters. (Photo by Bilgin S. Sasmaz/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

“Take a look at that line,” said a Walgreens clerk. “What happened doesn’t seem to have dampened anyone’s courage.”

Clearly there were those who decided in the immediate aftermath of the shooting that they were too anxious to come to town. Others said they didn’t want to celebrate in the wake of the tragedy. They canceled their reservations, according to employees at several of the largest hotels on the Strip. None of the staffers wanted to say how many rooms had been left vacant, though a clerk at the modest Travelodge, half a mile north of the Mandalay Bay, said she took eight cancellations the day after the attack.

Related: The Vet Whose Invention Makes a Gun Fire Like a Machine Gun

But the view forward looked promising. A spokeswoman with the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority said “there is no evidence of cancellations at this time” among the hundreds of groups and companies booked for conventions this year. And the Travelodge employee said her hotel would be 90 percent full this weekend.

The resilience of the visitor economy comes after a year Vegas set a record, hosting 6.3 million business travelers who attended 21,864 meetings, according to the visitors authority. In 2016, the city hosted 57 of the 250 largest trade shows in the country.

RELATED: Makeshift memorial in Las Vegas for victims of the Route 91 music festival shooting

22 PHOTOS
Makeshift memorial in Las Vegas for victims of the Route 91 music festival shooting
See Gallery
Makeshift memorial in Las Vegas for victims of the Route 91 music festival shooting
Bry Thompson wipes away tears at a makeshift memorial in the middle of Las Vegas Boulevard following the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
A woman leaves flowers at a makeshift memorial on the Las Vegas Strip for victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 3, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
People leave flowers at a makeshift memorial on the Las Vegas Strip for victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A woman signs a memorial board on the Las Vegas Strip for victims of the Route 91 music festival mass shooting next to the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S. October 3, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Greg Arnerich of Mesa, Arizona (R) and Brandon Metzger of Temecula, California view a memorial near the sight of the mass shooting along the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
The Mandalay Bay hotel is shown through an American flag blowing in the wind at a memorial next to the mass shooting site along the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A sign is pictured at a makeshift memorial in the middle of Las Vegas Boulevard following the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
Friends stop and pause at a makeshift memorial in the middle of Las Vegas Boulevard following the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A woman leaves flowers at a makeshift memorial along Las Vegas Boulevard following a mass shooing in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 3, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
People gather at a makeshift memorial in the middle of Las Vegas Boulevard following the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Wattie
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Edith Garcia of Nevada wipes her eyes at a makeshift memoral set up along the Las Vegas Strip on October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The memorial made with candles, flowers and mementos is in response to last Sunday night's shooting when a lone gunman opened fire on the crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival killing at least 59 people and injuring more than 500. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Gloria Vitagliano of Nevada draws out the hashtag #VEGASSTRONG at a makeshift memoral set up along the Las Vegas Strip on October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The memorial made with candles, flowers and mementos is in response to last Sunday night's shooting when a lone gunman opened fire on the crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival killing at least 59 people and injuring more than 500. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: A memorial for the victims of Sunday's shooting is seen along the Las Vegas Strip on October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The makeshift memorial made with candles, flowers and mementos was created after a lone gunman opened fire on the crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival killing at least 59 people and injuring more than 500. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Mourners attend a memorial on Las Vegas Boulevard and Reno Avenue for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, 2017, lone gunman Stephan Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada opened fire on festival attendees leaving at least 59 dead and over 500 injured before killing himself. The investigation is ongoing. October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Mourners attend a memorial on Las Vegas Boulevard and Reno Avenue for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, 2017, lone gunman Stephan Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada opened fire on festival attendees leaving at least 59 dead and over 500 injured before killing himself. The investigation is ongoing. October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Mourners attend a memorial on Las Vegas Boulevard and Reno Avenue for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, 2017, lone gunman Stephan Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada opened fire on festival attendees leaving at least 59 dead and over 500 injured before killing himself. The investigation is ongoing. October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: A memorial on Las Vegas Boulevard and Reno Avenue for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, 2017, lone gunman Stephan Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada opened fire on festival attendees leaving at least 59 dead and over 500 injured before killing himself. The investigation is ongoing. October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: Signs and candles are displayed at a makeshift memorial set up across from the Las Vegas Village on October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. The spontaneous memorial located on the Las Vegas Strip was implemented in response to Sunday night's shooting on October 3, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Late Sunday night, a lone gunman killed at least 59 people and injured more than 500 after he opened fire on a large crowd at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival. The massacre is one of the deadliest mass shooting events in U.S. history. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 04: A memorial on Las Vegas Boulevard and Reno Avenue for the victims of the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shootings. On October 1, 2017, lone gunman Stephan Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nevada opened fire on festival attendees leaving at least 59 dead and over 500 injured before killing himself. The investigation is ongoing. October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Denise Truscello/Getty Images)
People comfort each other at a makeshift memorial outside the Route 91 music festival site in Las Vegas, Nevada on October 4, 2017, beside the Mandalay Hotel after a gunman fired from and killed 59 people and wounded more than 500 others when he opened fire from the hotel on a country music festival . Police said the gunman, a 64-year-old local resident named as Stephen Paddock, had been killed after a SWAT team responded to reports of multiple gunfire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay, a hotel-casino next to the concert venue. / AFP PHOTO / Mark RALSTON (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: Flowers, cards and candles begin to fill the median Wednesday morning as a memorial for the victims of the mass shooting near the crime scene off Las Vegas Boulevard on October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Gina Ferazzi/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

The financial markets seemed weary, but only slightly, with stocks for the biggest gambling and resort companies dipping slightly early in the week, before recovering on Wednesday. MGM Resorts International, owner of more than a dozen properties in the city, dropped 3 percent before rallying. Caesars Entertainment Corp. barely budged before returning to $13.40 a share, near its high for the year. Boyd Gaming Corp. hovered near a three-year high, at more than $25.50 per share at midweek.

“Expect Resilience With the U.S. Traveler,” Nomura Securities headlined its note to investors after the attack.

“You go back to a shooting in a casino in Manila, the Orlando incident, Paris, in each of those instances the city recovered. And we expect the same for Las Vegas,” Harry Curtis, a managing director and senior analyst at Nomura told CNBC. (He was referring to a shooting and arson in the Philippines in June that killed 36; the 2016 nightclub massacre in Florida that left 49 dead; and the 2015 assault on a French concert hall and other venues that claimed 130 lives.)

Related: Las Vegas Gunman Meticulously Planned Shooting, Sheriff Says

Determined to reinforce the trend of resiliency, James J. Murren, the chief executive of MGM, met Wednesday with conventioneers from the software maker Ceridian and their customers. He told the gathering that the attack on Sunday (launched from an MGM property) was tragedy enough and that the damage would only be compounded if visitors turned away from Las Vegas, according to a couple of businessmen who attended the event.

RELATED: Victims of the Las Vegas shooting

54 PHOTOS
Victims of the Las Vegas shooting
See Gallery
Victims of the Las Vegas shooting
Chris Roybal of Southern California, was a Navy veteran who served in Afghanistan, ABC News said. He was 28.

(Photo via GoFundMe)

Sonny Melton (pictured right) is seen with his wife Heather, who survived the shooting.

(Photo via Heather Gulish Melton)

Quinton Robbins, 20, is described by his aunt as "the most kind and loving soul."

(Photo via Kilee Wells Sanders/Facebook)

Jordan McIldoon (left), 23, of British Columbia, was confirmed dead by his parents as well as fellow concert-goer Heather Gooze, who said McIldoon died in her arms. 

(Photo via Facebook)

Victim of the October 1, 2017 mass shooting at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, Jordan McIldoon, is seen in this undated social media photo obtained by Reuters October 3, 2017. Social media/Handout via REUTERS

Jassica Klymchuk, a single mother of 4, was visiting Las Vegas from Alberta with her fiancé. 

(Photo via Facebook)

Lisa Romero worked as a secretary at her local high school in Gallup, New Mexico. 

(Photo via Facebook)

Denise Burditus, of West Virginia, was attending the concert with her husband, and died in his arms. 

(Photo via Facebook)

Rachael Parker was a records technician for the Manhattan Beach Police Department in California, she was 33. 

(Photo via Twitter)
Susan Smith worked for the Simi Valley Unified School District in California.

(Photo via Facebook)

Adrian Murfitt was a commercial fisherman in Anchorage, Alaska, the Alaska Dispatch News reported. He was 35.

(Social media/Handout via REUTERS)

John Phippen of Santa Clarita, California, was a father of five, grandfather of one and owned a remodeling and repair company. 

(Photo via GoFundMe)

Angie Gomez was a 2015 graduate of Riverside Polytechnic High School in California.

(Photo via GoFundMe)

Victim of the October 1, 2017 mass shooting at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, Angie Gomez, is seen in this undated social media photo obtained by Reuters October 3, 2017. Social media/Handout via REUTERS

Dana Gardner (pictured left) was attending the concert with her daughter, according to a GoFundMe page set up in her memory.

(Photo via GoFundMe)

Rhonda LeRocque attended the concert with her husband, and their 7-year-old daughter, who were not injured, according to the Boston Globe.

(Photo via Facebook)
Jenny Parks was a wife, mother to two young children and a teacher, according to a GoFundMe account set up in her memory.

(Photo via Facebook)
Nesya Tonks was the mother of three boys, according to a GoFundMe set up by her employeer, Technologent.

(Photo via GoFundMe)

Hannah Ahlers is survived by her husband and three children.

Photo Credit: Facebook

Carrie Barnette, 34, was in Las Vegas for a friends 30th birthday party.

Photo Credit: Nicole Johnson

Sandy Casey had taught special education for 9 years at the Manhattan Beach Unified School District. 

Photo Credit: Manhattan Beach Unified School District

Victim of the October 1, 2017 mass shooting at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, Sandy Casey, is seen in this undated social media photo

(Social media/Handout via REUTERS)

Thomas Day Jr. is survived by his four children who attended the Route 91 Harvest Festival with him. 

Photo Credit: Thomas Day Jr./Facebook

Charleston Hartfield, 34, was an off-duty Las Vegas police officer, youth football coach, and military veteran. Our… https://t.co/UafOdLrcFz

Bailey Schweitzer was only 20 years old and had just started working at Infinity Communications and consulting as a receptionist 7 months ago. 

Photo Credit: Infinity Communications and Consulting

Victim of the October 1, 2017 mass shooting at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, Bailey Schweitzer, is seen in this undated social media photo obtained by Reuters October 3, 2017. Social media/Handout via REUTERS
Victim of the October 1, 2017 mass shooting at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, Melissa Ramirez, is seen in this undated social media photo obtained by Reuters October 3, 2017. Social media/Handout via REUTERS
Victim of the October 1, 2017 mass shooting at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, Jack Beaton, is seen in this undated social media photo obtained by Reuters October 3, 2017. Social media/Handout via REUTERS
Christiana Duarte had begun working at her first full-time job since graduated college, according to the Los Angeles Times.

(Photo via Facebook)
Stacee Etcheber was a mother and wife to a San Francisco Police Dept. officer.

(Photo via Facebook)
Jennifer Topaz Irvine was a family law attorney based in San Diego, according to CBS News.

(Photo via Facebook
A fourth Kern County resident has passed away: Family of 27 y.o. Kelsey Meadows, confirm that she is the fourth Ker… https://t.co/DdzsCXbBh5
Calla Medig was described as a kind-hearted young woman with a beaming smile, according to CBC News in Canada.

(Photo via Facebook)
Cameron Robinson (pictured right) was an amazing friend, son, brother, uncle, cousin, coworker and boyfriend known for his love of cooking and dancing, according to a fundraising page set up in his memory.

(Photo via GoFundMe)
Family tells me Kurt Von Tillow from Cameron Park was killed in #LasVegasShooting. Say he ❤️ his country. Always wo… https://t.co/w7Ndiq5YlO

Bill Wolfe Jr. was a loving husband and a wrestling coach in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania.


(Photo via GoFundMe)

A fundraising account set up for Dorene Anderson (pictured top left) described her as a loving wife, mother, sister, aunt and friend.

(Phot via GoFundMe)

Steve Berger was celebrating his 44th birthday with a group of friends, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported.

(Photo via EFS Advisors)

Tara Roe Smith was the mother of two young sons, according to the Canadian Press. She was reportedly separated from her husband, Zach, during the shooting.  

(Photo via GoFundMe)
Erick Silva has been identified as one of the victims in the #LasVegasShooting https://t.co/uv3taTQCqU

Brennan Stewart had a love for music and his family requested that the funds raised from a GoFundMe account set up in his honor be used for a local youth organization that is centered around the arts.

(Photo via GoFundMe)

Michelle Vo was attending her first country music concert, according to the San Jose Mercury News.


(Photo via Facebook)

Heather Alvarado loved to travel with her three children and her husband, according to a statement released by the Cedar City Police Department to local media.

(Photo via GoFundMe)

Denise Cohen was a mother of two who was attending the concert with her boyfriend.

(Social media/Handout via REUTERS)

Victim of the October 1, 2017 mass shooting at the Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, Jordyn Rivera, is seen in this undated social media photo.

(Social media/Handout via REUTERS)

Candice Bowers was a single mother of three and is described her as a superhero who loved country music; she was ki… https://t.co/9qh6ARaN2I
Andrea Castilla was celebrating her 28th birthday with her sister, boyfriend and her sister's fiancee, according to a GoFundMe page set up by her family.

(Photo via Facebook)
Austin Davis was considered a friend to all, according to a fundraising site set up in his memory. He was 29.

(Photo via GoFundMe)
Chris Hazencomb saved his friend's life by shielding her, the Ventura County Star reported. He was 44.

(Photo via GoFundMe)
Victor Link, 52, “I could type for hours saying how great of a man you were and how everyone loves you so so much.”… https://t.co/qu3fOQ3jY7
Lisa Patterson was a loving mother, wife and donated countless hours to her community, according to a GoFundMe account. She was 46.

(Photo via GoFundMe)
Rocio Guillen Rocha was still on maternity leave after giving birth to her fourth child six weeks ago, NPR reported. She was 40.

(Photo via GoFundMe)
Derrick "Bo" Taylor served the Ventura Conservation Camp for decades according to statement by the California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation. He was 56.

(Photo via Facebook)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Gambling and entertainment concerns will not escape the attacks unscathed, said Curtis, the analyst. He said the companies would have to endure cancellations and make refunds, which the big resorts agreed to do, waiving normal cancellation policies. Higher security costs should also be expected, Curtis added. (The Wynn Las Vegas and Encore hotels, for example, used hand-held metal detectors to screen some visitors on Tuesday.) But those moves will only amount to a cost increase of about half of 1 percent, Curtis predicted.

The stakes could not be higher for Las Vegas, a city wedded to human diversion in the way Detroit used to be bonded to the auto industry. And, as both cities learned, good times can be very, very good. Last year, Vegas tourism generated $59.6 billion in revenue, spawned 407,000 jobs — nearly 44 percent of the city's total labor force — and generated nearly $17 billion in wages and salaries.

The unusual nature of Sunday night’s attack — with hundreds of bullets raining down on country music fans right off Vegas’s signature boulevard — makes it hard to predict how potential visitors might respond in the future, said Stephen M. Miller, director of UNLV’s Center for Business and Economic Research.

"Orlando went through a similar episode recently, and evidence suggests that event didn't have a major effect on tourism,” Miller said. “But the difference is the nightclub wasn't on Main Street in Disney World."

RELATED: Donald and Melania Trump visit Las Vegas following music festival shooting

14 PHOTOS
Donald and Melania Trump visit Las Vegas following music festival shooting
See Gallery
Donald and Melania Trump visit Las Vegas following music festival shooting
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump depart for travel to Las Vegas, in the aftermath of the shooting there, from the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, U.S. October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Air Force One departs Las Vegas past the broken windows on the Mandalay Bay hotel, where shooter Stephen Paddock conducted his mass shooting along the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department with first responders who reacted to the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017.
U.S. President Donald Trump, with first lady Melania Trump, greets trauma center staff at the University Medical Center after meeting with victims in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump meet with police at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. Las Vegas Location REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump step from Air Force One as they arrive in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S, October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump is greeted by Clark County Sheriff Joseph Lombardo as he arrives to meet with officials and first responders in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. Las Vegas Location REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump, with first lady Melania Trump, arrives to talk to reporters with University Medical Center Trauma Center Medical Director Dr. John Fildes (L), after meeting with victims in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump is greeted by survivor family members Shelby Stalker and Stephanie Melanson (L) after meeting with Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman (C) and police at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks next to first lady Melania Trump after meeting with police at the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department in the wake of the mass shooting in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
Air Force One departs Las Vegas past the broken windows on the Mandalay Bay hotel where shooter Stephen Paddock conducted his mass shooting along the Las Vegas Strip in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., October 4, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Blake
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: President Donald Trump, joined by first lady Melania Trump and medical staff, speaks to reporters at University Medical Center, October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Trump is scheduled to visit with victims and first responders from Sunday night's mass shooting during his trip to Las Vegas. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - OCTOBER 4: President Donald Trump and Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo greet a room full of police officers and first responders at Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department headquarters, October 4, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Trump is scheduled to visit with victims and first responders from Sunday night's mass shooting during his trip to Las Vegas. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Jeff Waddoups, chairman of UNLV’s Department of Economics at Lee Business School, said security improvements will help assure consumers who might still have doubts. He cited a 1980 fire at the MGM hotel in Las Vegas that killed 85 people and noted that laws were changed — including a requirement for sprinkler systems — to help prevent another tragedy.

“That's what I think we need to do now — but with gun control,” said Waddoups, raising a hot-button issue that both Nevada and U.S. office holders have been reluctant to address. “Business and political leaders need to come together to increase security so that people feel safe here."

A spate of immediate cancellations notwithstanding, the vast majority of visitors chose to stay in Las Vegas after the attack, or to go ahead with plans to come to the city in the hours and days that followed.

Holly Herd, a teacher from Midland, Texas, arrived Wednesday, and was waiting near the T-Mobile Arena for six other women, who would be celebrating her niece’s 21st birthday. Her niece worried whether she could have fun after the terrible loss of life. “It’s sad. It’s so sad,” Herd agreed.

But her group shucked off thoughts of canceling. “It was too many people involved and too many logistics,” Herd said. “And, come on, it’s her 21st birthday! We have T-shirts that match and all that. I mean, come on, we have to do this for her!”

Jean Van Roo of Wisconsin arrived with a cousin and a girlfriend Sunday afternoon and slept right through the fusillade that night, in a hotel room just a long block away from the Mandalay Bay. She said the trio, all retirement age, never thought about heading home.

“We had tickets for Celine Dion,” she explained. “We saw her last night and it was fantastic. ... I actually feel safer with the police presence. I think that guy was loony-toons and it was an isolated incident.”

Read Full Story

Markets

NASDAQ 6,936.58 80.06 1.17%
S&P 500 2,675.81 23.80 0.90%
DJIA 24,651.74 143.08 0.58%
NIKKEI 225 22,553.22 -141.23 -0.62%
HANG SENG 28,848.11 -318.27 -1.09%
DAX 13,103.56 35.48 0.27%
USD (per EUR) 1.17 0.00 -0.21%
USD (per CHF) 0.99 0.00 0.20%
JPY (per USD) 112.57 0.19 0.17%
GBP (per USD) 1.33 -0.01 -0.82%

Can't get enough business news?

Sign up for Finance Report by AOL and get everything from retailer news to the latest IPOs delivered directly to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.