US will need immigrants for jobs created by Trump tax reform - Manpower

PARIS, Sept 29 (Reuters) - The United States will have to rely in part on immigrants to fill jobs created thanks to President Donald Trump's tax reform plan announced this week, the head of global staffing company Manpower said.

Trump proposed on Wednesday the biggest U.S. tax overhaul in three decades, aimed at helping working people with tax cuts and creating jobs.

"Immigration will have to support the increased jobs growth because right now the labor markets are extremely tight as they are," Manpower Chief Executive Jonas Prising told Reuters in an interview in Paris.

Though active in 80 countries, the United States is the Milwaukee-based recruiter's biggest market after France, according to Thomson Reuters data.

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Historical photos of immigrants traveling through Ellis Island
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Historical photos of immigrants traveling through Ellis Island

An Italian family with their baggage, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A Slovakian grandmother, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

Newcomers being interviewed, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A Jewish immigrant, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

An immigrant family, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

Immigrants climbing stairs, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A Jewish grandmother, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A group of immigrants, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

Slavic mothers with a child, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A family of seven sons and one daughter, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A Slavic immigrant, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

A woman and two children, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

An immigrant woman, 1904

(Photo by Lewis Hine via the New York Public Library)

Deported Hungarian gypsies in 1905.

(Photo by Augustus Sherman via the New York Public Library)

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(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
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(Photo via Augustus Sherman via New York Public Library)
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Although the U.S. unemployment rate has been running in recent months at a 10-year low around 4.4 percent, Prising said there was scope to absorb extra workers into the labor market.

With the labor force participation rate at close to a 40-year low, the pool of available workers could in part be increased by skilling up people currently sitting on the sidelines but also through immigration, Prising said.

"The issue is going to be where are those people going to come from," he said.

"That's where some of the rhetoric and some of the thoughts about immigration and how we think about our talent pool are frankly going to be counterproductive," he added.

An increased demand for workers from abroad could sit at odds with Trump's plans to clamp down on immigration, which he hopes to slash by building a wall on the border with Mexico. (Reporting by Leigh Thomas, editing by Ed Osmond)

 

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