Half of millennials would give up their right to vote for this one thing

Going to college may mean fraternity parties and tailgating for some students, but for many it means graduating with crippling debt.

In fact, the Department of Education estimates the country's student loan debt is at an all time high of 1.3 trillion dollars.

Debt can cause all sorts of stress in a person’s life.

Maybe that's why a new survey by Credible found that half of millennials would rather give up their right to vote in the next two presidential elections than cut another loan payment check.

But what if you could elect a president that would wipe out student debt? 

It’s a bit risky. Fox Business reports, during his presidential campaign, Trump proposed student loan forgiveness after 15 years of repayment.

Still, ditching the right to vote is extreme.

A little more than 40 percent also said they'd give up ride sharing services and traveling abroad for five years.

However, looks like Trump as president is still not as bad as moving back in with mom and dad because only 27 percent said they'd go that far.

RELATED: 2016 issues: Education politics, student loans, common core

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2016 issues: Education politics, student loans, common core
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2016 issues: Education politics, student loans, common core
UNITED STATES - JUNE 10: From left, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, participate in the press conference in the Capitol to call for the elimination of student loan debt at public higher education institutions on Wednesday, June 10, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 10: From left, Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, participate in the press conference in the Capitol to call for the elimination of student loan debt at public higher education institutions on Wednesday, June 10, 2015. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
EXETER, NH - AUGUST 10: Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a town hall meeting at Exeter High School August 10, 2015 in Exeter, New Hampshire. Clinton discussed college affordability and student debt relief. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MAY 19: Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., attends a news conference with members of the National Nurses Association at the Senate swamp on legislation 'to eliminate undergraduate tuition at public colleges and universities and to expand work-study programs,' May 19, 2015. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
US President Barack Obama applauds a speaker after his introduction before signing a memorandum on reducing the burden of student loans on June 9, 2014 in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
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