Trump says wealthy might have to accept higher taxes under his tax plan

WASHINGTON, Sept 13 (Reuters) - President Donald Trump said on Wednesday that under his tax reform plan, wealthy Americans would not gain and might have to pay higher taxes.

Meeting with a bipartisan group of lawmakers at the White House, Trump said his main goal is to cut taxes for the middle class and cut corporate taxes to enhance job growth.

Related: The most tax-friendly states in America:

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Most tax-friendly states in America

10. Delaware

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9. Mississippi

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8. South Dakota.

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7. Alabama

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6. Louisiana

(Alamy)

5. Arizona

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4. Nevada

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3. Florida

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2. Alaska

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1. Wyoming

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"The rich will not be gaining at all with this plan. We are looking for the middle class and we are looking for jobs - jobs being the economy. So we're looking at middle class and we're looking at jobs," he said.

"I think the wealthy will be pretty much where they are, pretty much where they are. ... If they have to go higher, they'll go higher," he said. (Reporting By Steve Holland; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama)

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