These are 3 of the worst job interviews

Job interviews are nothing if not nerve-wracking. Most of the time, they end up not being nearly as bad as you imagined. But sometimes they really are that terrible – or even worse than you thought they could go. U.S. News asked people for their worst interview experiences, recounted below:

The one where you don't get the job but then have to train your replacement. Shana Westlake was freelancing for a large media company as an associate producer. She pushed to be considered for it full time, since she was covering for someone who left. She got a chance to interview for the job with two of her then supervisors, but it seemed they didn't know her at all. For example, they were surprised she had a degree in journalism and was working on her master's in media studies – even though they had known her for months. And the kicker after she didn't get the job? She had to train the person who did. "In retrospect, I'm glad I didn't end up in a lousy [situation], but it hurt at the time," she says. Westlake is now a media and communications consultant.

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The one that's beyond personal. Laura Deane Devitt, who is currently in Chicago in the social work field, was interviewing for a research position in 2015. The president and vice president of the company asked her if she was married and when she thought she would be starting a family. "I am embarrassed to say that I did answer these questions honestly because I didn't know what else to do at that point," she says. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission says such questioning could "violate Title VII if used to deny or limit employment opportunities."

She took the job at the time (she is no longer with the company) but wishes she handled it differently now. "Overall, I wish I had stood up for myself during that interview and told them that their questions were inappropriate," she says. "I have grown from this situation but I won't forget it," she adds.

The one where it's not you, it's them. Interview not lead to anything? For all you know, it could have had nothing to do with you. The interviewer could actually just be in the most awkward situation ever. "My boss made me interview people for a job with the knowledge that we already had made a decision on who we were hiring," a web show producer, who wished to not be identified, tells U.S. News. "I had to do multiple interviews with people knowing that I was wasting their time and getting their hopes up, while not letting them know they had no chance."

RELATED: 10 things you should always say in a job interview

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