How much will Hurricanes Harvey and Irma hurt the economy?

As cleanup efforts begin in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey's record-setting rainfall over Houston, Corpus Christi, Texas, and the surrounding Gulf region, analysts are still trying to figure out exactly how severely the deluge dinged the U.S. economy's overall trajectory.

Gas prices spiked as oil refineries were forced offline. Trade through Gulf ports was stalled or rerouted, in some cases raising prices for shippers and consumers as products took longer to get to their intended destinations. And local businesses were ravaged by floodwaters and lost foot traffic as community members evacuated and were unable to return to their homes.

SEE ALSO: Parts of Florida are running out of gas as Hurricane Irma approaches

And with Hurricane Irma barreling toward Florida – ripping up large swaths of the Caribbean that lie in its path – analysts are predicting a perfect storm of labor market disruption as unemployment climbs and gross domestic product readings fall.

"The primary concern related to both hurricanes is the human story, not the economic one," Jim Baird, partner and chief investment officer at Plante Moran Financial Advisors, said in a statement Thursday. "Nonetheless, the near-term economic impact of what increasingly appears to be two severe natural disasters in close proximity to one another will be a clear negative, and disruptive to the regional economies in the impacted areas."

Animals being rescued during Harvey:

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Animals being rescued during Hurricane Harvey
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Animals being rescued during Hurricane Harvey
A man carries a dog after being rescued from rising floodwaters due to Hurricane Harvey in Spring, Texas, U.S., on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. A deluge of rain and rising floodwaters left�Houston�immersed and helpless,�crippling a global center of the oil industry and testing the economic resiliency of a state thats home to almost 1 in 12 U.S. workers. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A boy hugs his grandmothers' dog after being rescued from rising floodwaters due to Hurricane Harvey in Spring, Texas, U.S., on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. A deluge of rain and rising floodwaters left�Houston�immersed and helpless,�crippling a global center of the oil industry and testing the economic resiliency of a state thats home to almost 1 in 12 U.S. workers. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 27: Volunteers and officers from the neiborhood security patrol help to rescue residents and their dogs in the upscale River Oaks neighborhood after it was inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 27, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 27 2017: Elma Moreno comforts her dog, Simon as they are loaded on to a trucks after being evacuated from their flooded apartment. Tropical Storm Harvey is causing major flooding throughout Houston and Southeast Texas. (Photo by Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
A man carries a dog after being rescued from rising floodwaters due to Hurricane Harvey at the Highland Glen housing development in Spring, Texas, U.S., on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. A deluge of rain and rising floodwaters left�Houston�immersed and helpless,�crippling a global center of the oil industry and testing the economic resiliency of a state thats home to almost 1 in 12 U.S. workers. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Bentley, a 10 year old maltese, takes refuge with his owner in a school after they lost their home to Hurricane Harvey in Rockport, Texas, U.S. August 26, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Pets are evacuated from flood waters from Hurricane Harvey in Dickinson, Texas August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
People and their pets are rescued from flood waters from Hurricane Harvey on a boat in Dickinson, Texas August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Kenneth and Minnie Bice prepare to sleep outside the M.O. Campbell Red Cross shelter in Aldine, Texas, United States August 28, 2017. Pets are not allowed inside and so the two are sleeping on the portico with their two dogs and a cat. REUTERS/Peter Henderson
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 27: Residents carry their pets and belongings along Mercury Drive as they flee flood water at their homes in Houston, TX on Sunday, Aug 27, 2017. Rising water from Hurricane Harvey pushed thousands of people to rooftops or higher ground Sunday in Houston. (Photo by Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Flood victims move crates with pets at a shelter in the George R. Brown Convention Center during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Rescue teams in boats, trucks and helicopters scrambled Monday to reach hundreds of Texans marooned on flooded streets in and around the city of Houston before monster storm Harvey returns. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
People check in with their pets to a shelter in the George R. Brown Convention Center during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Rescue teams in boats, trucks and helicopters scrambled Monday to reach hundreds of Texans marooned on flooded streets in and around the city of Houston before monster storm Harvey returns. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Evacuation residence from the Meyerland area are loaded onto a truck on an I-610 overpass during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey August 27, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Hurricane Harvey left a trail of devastation Saturday after the most powerful storm to hit the US mainland in over a decade slammed into Texas, destroying homes, severing power supplies and forcing tens of thousands of residents to flee. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Evacuation residents from the Meyerland wait on an I-610 overpass for further help during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey August 27, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Hurricane Harvey left a trail of devastation Saturday after the most powerful storm to hit the US mainland in over a decade slammed into Texas, destroying homes, severing power supplies and forcing tens of thousands of residents to flee. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: People make their way out of a flooded neighborhood after it was inundated with rain water, remnants of Hurricane Harvey, on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in areas of Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: Evacuees make their way to dry land after leaving their homes that were inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A vet holds a dog at a shelter in the George R. Brown Convention Center during the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Rescue teams in boats, trucks and helicopters scrambled Monday to reach hundreds of Texans marooned on flooded streets in and around the city of Houston before monster storm Harvey returns. / AFP PHOTO / Brendan Smialowski (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: People evacuate their homes after the area was inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Indeed, initial unemployment claims climbed to 298,000 last week in the aftermath of Harvey's landfall – the metric's highest reading since April 2015. That represents a 62,000-claim jump and is well above what economists had expected to see. Filings in Texas, specifically, soared by nearly 52,000, making up the lion's share of the increase.

"The first impacts of Hurricane Harvey are beginning to be seen in the U.S. economic data," Scott Anderson, chief economist and executive vice president at Bank of the West Economics, wrote in a research note Thursday. "The Harvey impact will be felt for several more weeks as initial [jobless] claims remain temporarily elevated and net payroll job gains sink for the month of September."

Preparing for Hurricane Irma:

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Preparing for Hurricane Irma
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Preparing for Hurricane Irma
YEMASSEE, SC - SEPTEMBER 08: Northbound lanes of I-95 near the Georgia-South Carolina border are empty as northbound lanes are packed as pepole evacuate ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Irma September 8, 2017 in Yemassee, South Carolina. Florida appears to be in the path of the hurricane which may come ashore at category 4. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
ST. PETERSBURG, FL - SEPTEMBER 05: Stan Glass, of St. Petersburg, fills four 5-gallon fuel tanks with gasoline for his boat should he have to evacuate by boat as residents in the area prepare ahead of Hurricane Irma on September 05, 2017 in St. Petersburg, Florida. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) has reported that Hurricane Irma has strengthened to a Category 5 storm as it crosses into the Caribbean and is expected to move on towards Florida. (Photo by Brian Blanco/Getty Images)
A woman looks at empty shelves that are normally filled with bottles of water after Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello declared a state of emergency in preparation for Hurricane Irma, in San Juan, Puerto Rico September 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
People buy materials at a hardware store after Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello declared a state of emergency in preparation for Hurricane Irma, in Bayamon, Puerto Rico September 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
As Hurrcane Irma approaches Florida September 8, 2017 shoppers in Port St. John, near Kennedy Space Center, find almost empty shelves. Warning that Irma would be worse than Hurricane Andrew, which killed 65 people in 1992, Florida's governor said all of the state's 20.6 million inhabitants should be prepared to evacuate. / AFP PHOTO / BRUCE WEAVER (Photo credit should read BRUCE WEAVER/AFP/Getty Images)
People buy materials at a hardware store after Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello declared a state of emergency in preparation for Hurricane Irma, in Bayamon, Puerto Rico September 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Workers put boats on dry docks in preparation, as Hurricane Irma, barreling towards the Caribbean and the southern United States, was upgraded to a Category 4 storm, in San Juan, Puerto Rico September 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Customers walk near empty shelves that are normally filled with bottles of water after Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello declared a state of emergency in preparation for Hurricane Irma, in San Juan, Puerto Rico September 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
People buy materials at a hardware store after Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello declared a state of emergency in preparation for Hurricane Irma, in Bayamon, Puerto Rico September 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
People buy material at a hardware store after Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello declared a state of emergency in preparation for Hurricane Irma, in Bayamon, Puerto Rico September 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Workers put boats on dry docks in preparation, as Hurricane Irma, barreling towards the Caribbean and the southern United States, was upgraded to a Category 4 storm, in San Juan, Puerto Rico September 4, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Hurricane Irma, a record Category 5 storm, churns across the Atlantic Ocean on a collision course with Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, is shown in this NASA GOES satellite image taken at 1715 EDT (2215 GMT) on September 5, 2017. Courtesy NASA/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY
Members of the Civil Defense prepare their gear ahead of Hurricane Irma, in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic September 5, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
A member of the Emergency Operations Committee (COE) monitors the trajectory of Hurricane Irma in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic September 5, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
A member of the Emergency Operations Committee (COE) monitors the trajectory of Hurricane Irma in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic September 5, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
Shoppers in a Home Depot store wait for plywood in the Little Havana neighborhood in Miami, Florida, September 5, 2017. Residents are preparing for the approach of Hurricane Irma. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
Men cover the windows of a auto parts store in preparation for Hurricane Irma, in San Juan, Puerto Rico September 5, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
A man uses a cable to secure the roof of his home in preparation for Hurricane Irma, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico September 5, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Men cover the window of a house in preparation for Hurricane Irma, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico September 5, 2017. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Empty boxes of produce at Costco as customers purchased all the product on September 5, 2017 in Miami. The monster hurricane coming on the heels of Harvey, which struck Texas and Louisiana late last month, is expected to hit a string of Caribbean islands including Guadeloupe late Tuesday before heading to Haiti and Florida. The Miami-based National Hurricane Center said Irma had strengthened to the most powerful Category Five, packing winds of 180 miles (280 kilometers) per hour. / AFP PHOTO / Michele Eve Sandberg (Photo credit should read MICHELE EVE SANDBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
Shoppers at Costco buying essentials in preparation for Hurricane Irma on September 5, 2017 in North Miami. The monster hurricane coming on the heels of Harvey, which struck Texas and Louisiana late last month, is expected to hit a string of Caribbean islands including Guadeloupe late Tuesday before heading to Haiti and Florida. The Miami-based National Hurricane Center said Irma had strengthened to the most powerful Category Five, packing winds of 180 miles (280 kilometers) per hour. / AFP PHOTO / Michele Eve Sandberg (Photo credit should read MICHELE EVE SANDBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
Costco ran out of water as people shop to prepare for Hurricane Irma on September 5, 2017 in North Miami. The monster hurricane coming on the heels of Harvey, which struck Texas and Louisiana late last month, is expected to hit a string of Caribbean islands including Guadeloupe late Tuesday before heading to Haiti and Florida. The Miami-based National Hurricane Center said Irma had strengthened to the most powerful Category Five, packing winds of 180 miles (280 kilometers) per hour. / AFP PHOTO / Michele Eve Sandberg (Photo credit should read MICHELE EVE SANDBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
Very long checkout lines at Costco as some people waited up to 8 hours to check in, shop and leave in preparation for Hurricane Irma on September 5, 2017 in North Miami. The monster hurricane coming on the heels of Harvey, which struck Texas and Louisiana late last month, is expected to hit a string of Caribbean islands including Guadeloupe late Tuesday before heading to Haiti and Florida. The Miami-based National Hurricane Center said Irma had strengthened to the most powerful Category Five, packing winds of 180 miles (280 kilometers) per hour. / AFP PHOTO / Michele Eve Sandberg (Photo credit should read MICHELE EVE SANDBERG/AFP/Getty Images)
A woman takes a photo of a boarded up business in advance of Hurricane Irma's expected arrival in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S., September 8, 2017. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
YEMASSEE, SC - SEPTEMBER 08: Northbound lanes of I-95 near the Georgia-South Carolina border are empty as northbound lanes are packed as pepole evacuate ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Irma September 8, 2017 in Yemassee, South Carolina. Florida appears to be in the path of the hurricane which may come ashore at category 4. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
As Hurrcane Irma approaches Florida September 8, 2017 residents of Titusville, near Kennedy Space Center, have arleady exhausted the lumber yards of plywood used to board up windows. Irma is expected to arrive in the area Sunday afternoon, September 10th. Warning that Irma would be worse than Hurricane Andrew, which killed 65 people in 1992, Florida's governor said all of the state's 20.6 million inhabitants should be prepared to evacuate. / AFP PHOTO / BRUCE WEAVER (Photo credit should read BRUCE WEAVER/AFP/Getty Images)
As Hurrcane Irma approaches Florida September 8, 2017 residents of Titusville, near Kennedy Space Center, have stop for last minute items and fuel. Gas prices had already been raised because of Hurricane Harvey hitting Texas, making gasoline cost more per gallon than diesel fuel. Warning that Irma would be worse than Hurricane Andrew, which killed 65 people in 1992, Florida's governor said all of the state's 20.6 million inhabitants should be prepared to evacuate. / AFP PHOTO / BRUCE WEAVER (Photo credit should read BRUCE WEAVER/AFP/Getty Images)
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It's not uncommon for unemployment filings to increase in the wake of a disastrous storm, but analysts generally weren't counting on such an abrupt uptick.

"The one-week jump in claims of 62,000 was the biggest since an increase of 81,000 in November 2012 in the wake of Superstorm Sandy," Gus Faucher, chief economist and senior vice president at The PNC Financial Services Group, wrote in a research note Thursday, also noting that "claims jumped by 96,000 in the week after Hurricane Katrina in September 2005."

Those increases could end up weighing on the broader U.S. unemployment rate, which ticked up slightly to 4.4 percent in August but could be revised higher in the months ahead as the government collects more information on the impacts of a storm that's already shaping up to be one of the costliest and most destructive in recent history.

The founder, president and chairman of AccuWeather predicted last week that total losses from the storm would "reach $190 billion, or one percent of the nation's gross domestic product." Not all damage estimates are that lofty. But should that prediction hold true, it would mean Harvey was more costly than Hurricanes Sandy and Katrina combined.

"If the past is any guide, Q3 real GDP could be marginally weaker than expected due to the offline effects of the storm and the fact that Houston accounts for 3.2 percent of U.S. GDP, in addition to being a key energy and shipping hub," Joe Quinlan, managing director and chief market strategist at U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management, wrote in a research note Thursday. "To this point, in the weeks following Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy, unemployment claims spiked, industrial production dropped and higher gasoline prices dampened real personal consumption expenditures."

Harvey victims return home:

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Harvey victims return home
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Harvey victims return home
Erlind Trigo and her niece Miriam weep as they look at family photographs which they salvaged from their home in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
A man disposes of drywall while salvaging through belongings from his family home in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
George Diaz disposes of furniture while salvaging through belongings from his family home in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Mariah Castillo watches her mother Roxanne Castillo kiss her mother Dolores Hedger, 68, while salvaging through their family home in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Chairs are seen drying outside of a pentecostal church where local residents prepare for Sunday service after tropical storm Harvey in east Houston, Texas, U.S., September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Bible and hymn books that were damaged by tropical storm Harvey are seen outside a Baptist church in Dickinson, Texas, U.S., September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A volunteer helps clean up the damage from a Lutheran church in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Harvey in Dickinson, Texas, U.S., September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A volunteer helps clean up the damage from a Lutheran church in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Harvey in Dickinson, Texas, U.S., September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A home insurance inspector conducts an assessment of damages on the roof of a house after tropical storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S., September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Melissa Ramirez (C) struggles against the current flowing down a flooded street helped by Edward Ramirez (L) and Cody Collinsworth as she tried to return to her home for the first time since Harvey floodwaters arrived in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 1, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Nancy McBride collects items from her flooded kitchen as she returned to her home for the first time since Harvey floodwaters arrived in Houston, Texas September 1, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Nancy McBride's half eaten supper still sits on the table since she evacuated in haste before Harvey floodwaters arrived in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 1, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Nancy McBride's cat looks out from an air hole punched in a tub after the cat was found in her garage when McBride came home for the first time since Harvey floodwaters arrived in Houston, Texas September 1, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Patrice Laporte measures how much of the Harvey floodwaters have gone down at his house in Houston, Texas September 1, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
The high water mark is visible on a house surrounded Harvey floodwaters in Houston, Texas September 1, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
A girl carries toys she collected from a trash pile of Hurricane Harvey flood damage in southwestern Houston, Texas, U.S. September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
People sort through belongings found in Hurricane Harvey flood damage in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
A volunteer from Texas A&M University helps to clean up flood damage in the house of an alumnus in southwestern Houston, Texas September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Shirts are see drying outside of a trailer house damaged by tropical storm Harvey in East Houston, Texas, U.S. September 1, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
People sort through belongings found in Hurricane Harvey flood damage in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Rogelio Salina takes as break as he helps a neighbor to clean a house damaged by Tropical Storm Harvey in East Houston, Texas, U.S. September 1, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A man tears out Hurricane Harvey flood damage from a home in southwestern Houston, Texas, U.S. September 2, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Vince Ware moves his sofas onto the sidewalk from his house which was left flooded from Tropical Storm Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S. September 3, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif
Daniel Vasquez removes a damaged carpet after Tropical Storm Harvey flooded his home in east Houston, Texas, U.S. September 3, 2017. Vasquez and his family, originally from El Salvador, spent six days at the shelter after being airlifted by rescue helicopter. Vasquez, a truck driver who supports a family of five, did not hold flood insurance. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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A common narrative in the immediate aftermath of Harvey's landfall was that the storm would wreak havoc on local communities but wouldn't materially hold down the broader U.S. economy. But as the days went on and the full extent of its damage was assessed, outlooks and predictions began to darken.

"The storm's effect on U.S. GDP is likely to be substantial, but substantial when it comes to large storms is measured in tenths of a percent rather than full percentage points," a team of researchers at UBS wrote in a research note last week. "The fall in U.S. GDP comes from an outright decline in employment as well as a curtailment of exports, especially exports of petroleum products."

In a more recent note published Thursday, UBS researchers warned that "Harvey's economic implications point to more downside risk to payrolls and near-term GDP growth than initially anticipated."

Still, an outpouring of charitable giving and the passage of a $15 billion federal relief package through Capitol Hill this week are aimed at mitigating the losses and hardship engulfing communities damaged by the storm. But Anderson warned a "one-two punch" is on the way in the form of Hurricane Irma – whose heavy winds and driving rain are expected to slam into southern Florida in the coming days.

Barclays researchers earlier this week predicted the Category 5 storm could generate up to $130 billion in insured damage.

"It is estimated that 2 million people in Florida could lose power and Florida's agriculture sector will be hit too, which could lead to price increases for tomatoes, oranges, green beans and cucumbers," Anderson said.

Price increases, community upheaval and unemployment upticks are expected to weigh on national economic growth in the months ahead – but analysts have been quick to point out that previous catastrophic storms didn't completely derail the economy's progress over the long haul. The economy is likely to take on water in the months ahead, but few are expecting growth to completely halt.

"Monthly job growth weakened in the wakes of Katrina and Sandy, but did not outright decline," Faucher said. "Outside of the storms, the U.S. labor market remains in solid shape. With improving demand businesses continue to hire, and the economy is at close to full employment."

RELATED: Irma's destruction in the Domincan Republic

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Irma's destruction in the Dominican Republic
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Irma's destruction in the Dominican Republic
A damaged house is pictured as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic, September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
A police vehicle passes a fallen power pole as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic, September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
Locals stand next to a damaged road as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic, September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
A man walks among debris as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic, September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
A local stands next to a damaged house as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic, September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
Locals gather near debris as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic, September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
Locals ride their bikes among debris on a beach as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic, September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
A person walks through a flooded street as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic, September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
Locals walk past a fallen stadium lighting tower as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
A local stands next to a fallen roof as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
Locals remove pieces from a fallen stadium lighting tower as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
Locals walk past a fallen stadium lighting tower as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic, September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
Waves crash against the shore as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
People walk past debris as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A woman stands in the rain as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
A person walks through a flooded street as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
A man secures boats as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
A man stands outside the remains of his house as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
A man walks among debris as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
A woman walks through a flooded street as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
People look at what is left of their home as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
People walk on a street covered in debris as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
A man packs a bag with clothes he recovered from his damaged home as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
People look at what is left of their home as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
Men walk past a destroyed house as Hurricane Irma moves off from the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Nagua, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ricardo Rojas
A man looks out to the flooded street as Hurricane Irma moves off the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic September 7, 2017. REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado
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