Here's how stocks perform after a solar eclipse

A total solar eclipse may represent a blockage of sunlight, but the stock market has historically caught fire after past occurrences.

US equity prices have climbed an average of 17.2% in the year following total solar eclipses visible from the US, according to data compiled by LPL Financial. The last time came in July 1991, after which stocks rose 9.9%.

RELATED: Here's how the stock exchange performed before the election:

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New York Stock Exchange before the election
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New York Stock Exchange before the election
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City, U.S., November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City, U.S., November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City, U.S., November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City, U.S., November 7, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York City, U.S., November 3, 2016. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid
Pedestrians walk along Wall Street near the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Monday, Oct. 31, 2016. U.S. stocks rose from a six-week low amid an increase in deal activity as traders assessed the outlook for the presidential election and interest rates in the world's largest economy. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 01: Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on November 1, 2016 in New York City. As Wall Street continues to feel election uncertainty, the Dow Jones closes fell more than 100 points. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016. U.S. stocks fluctuated amid payrolls data that bolstered speculation the economy is strong enough to weather higher interest rates, while investors remained wary before the looming presidential election. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Friday, Nov. 4, 2016. U.S. stocks fluctuated amid payrolls data that bolstered speculation the economy is strong enough to weather higher interest rates, while investors remained wary before the looming presidential election. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 01: Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on November 1, 2016 in New York City. As Wall Street continues to feel election uncertainty, the Dow Jones closes fell more than 100 points. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Monday, Oct. 31, 2016. U.S. stocks rose from a six-week low amid an increase in deal activity as traders assessed the outlook for the presidential election and interest rates in the world's largest economy. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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"History has shown us that since 1900, any time a total solar eclipse has been seen in the U.S., equity prices have gone up," LPL Financial senior market strategist Ryan Detrick wrote in a recent blog post. "It appears our biggest worry isn't what stocks might do, but whether those glasses we bought online are officially approved by NASA!"

Of course, this research must be taken with a grain of salt. There are so many other drivers of equity performance that any correspondence with the solar calendar should be viewed as coincidental byproduct.

The S&P 500 is currently about 8 1/2 years into its ongoing bull market, which makes it already the second-longest on record. It's continuation will hinge on whether corporations can keep growing earnings, and if economic conditions can remain robust.

"Should you ever invest based on the solar system? Absolutely not," said Detrick. "Things like fundamentals, valuations and technicals are still what drive markets."

Here's LPL's full breakdown of past performance, post-eclipse:

Screen Shot 2017 08 21 at 2.19.17 PMLPL Financial

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Markets

NASDAQ 6,461.32 6.68 0.10%
S&P 500 2,506.65 2.78 0.11%
DJIA 22,370.80 39.45 0.18%
NIKKEI 225 20,310.46 11.08 0.05%
HANG SENG 28,127.80 76.39 0.27%
DAX 12,569.36 7.57 0.06%
USD (per EUR) 1.20 0.00 0.21%
USD (per CHF) 0.96 0.00 -0.30%
JPY (per USD) 111.26 -0.32 -0.28%
GBP (per USD) 1.36 0.00 0.29%

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