Read Tim Cook's powerful note to Apple employees about Charlottesville violence

Apple CEO Tim Cook has no time for white supremacists and neo-Nazis.

SEE ALSO: Trump blames 'many sides' for violence in Charlottesville

He made it pretty clear in a powerful note to Apple employees, which also slams Trump's "moral equivalence" between Nazis and human rights demonstrators.

In the email, obtained by Recode, Cook also announced the company would make contributions of $1 million each to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) and the Anti-Defamation League.

Apple plans to match its employees' donations to these and other human rights groups on a 2-for-1 basis, until September 30. Moreover, in the coming days iTunes will offer users an easy way to join the company in directly supporting the work of the SPLC.

"I disagree with the president and others who believe that there is a moral equivalence between white supremacists and Nazis, and those who oppose them by standing up for human rights," Cook wrote. "Equating the two runs counter to our ideals as Americans."

Cook's blistering attack on Trump comes after as business leaders such as the heads of 3M, Campbell Soup, Johnson & Johnson, and United Technologies announced their resignations from advisory councils on Wednesday in protest against the president's comments about the violence in Charlottesville.

As a consequence, the president said he is scrapping two business councils, the Manufacturing Council & Strategy & Policy Forum.

More recently, Apple has warred with Trump in debates over immigration and climate change. Behind the scenes, however, Cook has labored to shape the Trump administration's policies on issues from tax reform to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights, sources previously told Recode. Cook has sounded off not only with the president individually but also his top advisors, like son-in-law Jared Kushner and his wife, Ivanka.

Here's Cook's full note:

Team,

Like so many of you, equality is at the core of my beliefs and values. The events of the past several days have been deeply troubling for me, and I've heard from many people at Apple who are saddened, outraged or confused.

What occurred in Charlottesville has no place in our country. Hate is a cancer, and left unchecked it destroys everything in its path. Its scars last generations. History has taught us this time and time again, both in the United States and countries around the world.

We must not witness or permit such hate and bigotry in our country, and we must be unequivocal about it. This is not about the left or the right, conservative or liberal. It is about human decency and morality. I disagree with the president and others who believe that there is a moral equivalence between white supremacists and Nazis, and those who oppose them by standing up for human rights. Equating the two runs counter to our ideals as Americans.

Regardless of your political views, we must all stand together on this one point — that we are all equal. As a company, through our actions, our products and our voice, we will always work to ensure that everyone is treated equally and with respect.

I believe Apple has led by example, and we're going to keep doing that. We have always welcomed people from every walk of life to our stores around the world and showed them that Apple is inclusive of everyone. We empower people to share their views and express themselves through our products.

In the wake of the tragic and repulsive events in Charlottesville, we are stepping up to help organizations who work to rid our country of hate. Apple will be making contributions of $1 million each to the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League. We will also match two-for-one our employees' donations to these and several other human rights groups, between now and September 30.

In the coming days, iTunes will offer users an easy way to join us in directly supporting the work of the SPLC.

Dr. Martin Luther King said, "Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter." So, we will continue to speak up. These have been dark days, but I remain as optimistic as ever that the future is bright. Apple can and will play an important role in bringing about positive change.

Best,

Tim

RELATED: The internet exposes Charlottesville protesters

8 PHOTOS
The internet exposes Charlottesville protesters
See Gallery
The internet exposes Charlottesville protesters
This is James Allsup -- speaker at the alt-right rally, Wash State U. College Republicans president, and one of… https://t.co/cqRBujyz5K
These two torchbearers are Ryan Martin (L) and Jacob Dix (R) of Centerville, Ohio #ExposeTheAltRight… https://t.co/i6UhaPm1bI
This little prick from Eagle Rock, VA was also in Charlottesville yesterday and thinks he's a tough guy… https://t.co/SzHlUU9JM9
Anybody have a name for this dope at the end of the @bakedalaska video in the ill-fitting white suit, tricorner hat… https://t.co/75VAfn3TGo
UPDATE: Cole White, the first person I exposed, no longer has a job 💁‍♂️ #GoodNightColeWhite #ExposeTheAltRight… https://t.co/9jrc3XGOnS
Annnnd here's a photo of Peter Cvjetanovic (angry torch guy) with U.S. Sen. @DeanHeller (via @BattleBornProg)… https://t.co/IYgF5I8zk5
Looks like Jason Kessler, the white supremacist who organized the hate march, met with Congressman @RepTomGarrett (… https://t.co/jNm7rIalu6
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