An eyewear chain is giving away free solar eclipse glasses - here's how to get them

Warby Parker is giving away free solar eclipse glasses.

The eyeglasses chain is giving away eclipse glasses at all of its 44 locations. All you have to do is head to a store and ask for up to two pairs of eclipse glasses.

While retailers such as Walmart and Amazon are selling out, Brokelyn reports that glasses are still available at Warby Parker locations, at least in New York City. Still, it's probably a good idea to call your local shop and make sure they haven't given away all their eclipse glasses before you arrive to pick them up.

"As champions of sharp vision, we want to help everyone see this cross-country celestial spectacle as clearly and safely as possible—before it disappears again for nearly 30 years," reads a page dedicated to the eclipse on Warby Parker's website.

RELATED: Here are all the states where you can see the solar eclipse:

16 PHOTOS
States where you can see the total solar eclipse of 2017
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States where you can see the total solar eclipse of 2017

Salem's the first sizable U.S. city with a chance to catch the eclipse when it hits Oregon.

Source: NASA

The eclipse will hit residents in Idaho next, with an opportunity to see totality in Idaho Falls. In Boise? Drive north a bit for your chance at totality.

Source: NASA

The eclipse sweeps across most of Wyoming, with Casper perfectly placed along the center of the path -- which means the eclipse will last longer there than on the outer edges.

Source: NASA

In Montana, but don't want to leave the state to get your eclipse fix? Totality will be visible from a tiny sliver of the Southwest corner of the state, but it's probably easier to just drive all the way to Idaho or Wyoming instead.

Source: NASA

Plenty of Nebraskans will have the chance to catch totality -- as the moon's shadow passes from the northwest corner of the state to the southeast corner.

Source: NASA

Like Montana, the total eclipse path will scrape across the tiniest portion of Iowa, but again, your best bet will likely be to travel into a state to your south or west instead. 

Source: NASA

You can catch the total eclipse from Kansas too if you head up to the northeast corner.

Source: NASA

Folks in Kansas City will get to see the total eclipse in Missouri, along with those in Columbia as it heads southeast across the state. St. Louis residents might need to drive a bit to see the total show.

Source: NASA

Residents of southern Illinois will get a total eclipse treat too, but anyone north of Belleville will need to drive to catch the big sight.

Source: NASA

Most folks in southwest Kentucky will get a chance to see the moon's shadow too.

Source: NASA

The eclipse will sweep across a big swath of Tennessee next, hitting Nashville and sweeping between Knoxville and Chattanooga.

Source: NASA

The northeast corner of Georgia is in the eclipse's path too. 

Source: NASA

Only a handful of North Carolinians will be able to see the total eclipse from their homes, as it hits a tiny portion of the southwest corner of the state.

Source: NASA

Source: NASA

Check out the entire eclipse's path!

Source: NASA

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Other good places to get free eclipse glasses are libraries and NASA viewing parties. Libraries are giving away 2 million free glasses and NASA is handing out 1.5 million.

NOW WATCH: Here's the best way to watch the solar eclipse if you don't have special glasses

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SEE ALSO: Solar eclipse glasses are selling out like crazy — here's where you can still get them

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