A man was fired from his job after a photo of him at the deadly Charlottesville white supremacist rally went viral

White nationalists who participated in the deadly rally in Charlottesville last weekend are being identified on social media, and one man has lost his job as a result.

Top Dog, a hot dog restaurant in Berkeley, California, said it fired employee Cole White on Saturday after the man was named by a Twitter account devoted to outing rally participants.

The internet exposes Charlottesville protesters:

8 PHOTOS
The internet exposes Charlottesville protesters
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The internet exposes Charlottesville protesters
This is James Allsup -- speaker at the alt-right rally, Wash State U. College Republicans president, and one of… https://t.co/cqRBujyz5K
These two torchbearers are Ryan Martin (L) and Jacob Dix (R) of Centerville, Ohio #ExposeTheAltRight… https://t.co/i6UhaPm1bI
This little prick from Eagle Rock, VA was also in Charlottesville yesterday and thinks he's a tough guy… https://t.co/SzHlUU9JM9
Anybody have a name for this dope at the end of the @bakedalaska video in the ill-fitting white suit, tricorner hat… https://t.co/75VAfn3TGo
UPDATE: Cole White, the first person I exposed, no longer has a job 💁‍♂️ #GoodNightColeWhite #ExposeTheAltRight… https://t.co/9jrc3XGOnS
Annnnd here's a photo of Peter Cvjetanovic (angry torch guy) with U.S. Sen. @DeanHeller (via @BattleBornProg)… https://t.co/IYgF5I8zk5
Looks like Jason Kessler, the white supremacist who organized the hate march, met with Congressman @RepTomGarrett (… https://t.co/jNm7rIalu6
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"Effective Saturday 12th August, Cole White no longer works at top dog," read a sign posted outside the restaurant on Sunday. "The actions of those in Charlottesville are not supported by top dog. We believe in individual freedom, and voluntary association for everyone."

The Twitter account that identified White, @YesYoureRacist, is encouraging the public to help identify other attendees shown in photos from the event.

Peter Cvjetanovic, 20, was also identified in a photo from the rally and later defended himself in an interview with a Las Vegas television station.

"As a white nationalist, I care for all people," he told Channel 2 News. "We all deserve a future for our children and for our culture. he told Channel 2 NewsWhite nationalists aren't all hateful; we just want to preserve what we have."

In the photo, Cvjetanovic is holding a torch and shouting. He said he understood that the photo has a "very negative connotation."

Few other businesses except for Tiki Brand, the company that makes Tiki torches, have weighed in on the rally.

Tiki Brand issued a statement about the rally on its Facebook page Saturday after its torches were widely used by white nationalists during Friday's protests.

"TIKI Brand is not associated in any way with the events that took place in Charlottesville and are deeply saddened and disappointed," the statement read. "We do not support their message or the use of our products in this way. Our products are designed to enhance backyard gatherings and to help family and friends connect with each other at home in their yard."

White nationalist protesters lead 'Nazi-esque' rally in Charlottesville:

19 PHOTOS
White nationalist protesters lead 'Nazi-esque' rally in Charlottesville
See Gallery
White nationalist protesters lead 'Nazi-esque' rally in Charlottesville
Riot police protect members of the Ku Klux Klan from counter-protesters as they arrive to rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Members of the Ku Klux Klan rally in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Protesters direct obscene gestures towards members of the Ku Klux Klan, who are rallying in support of Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TEMPLATE OUT
Counter-protesters shout at members of the Ku Klux Klan, who are rallying in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TEMPLATE OUT
Members of the Ku Klux Klan face counter-protesters as they rally in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Members of the Ku Klux Klan rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
A counter-protester is detained as members of the Ku Klux Klan rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Police detain a counter-protester during the aftermath of a rally by members of the Ku Klux Klan in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Counter-protesters lock arms in the middle of a street as police try to disperse them, after members of the Ku Klux Klan rallied in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Police, clergy and free speech observers protect a man wearing a Confederate flag as a cape after he was surrounded by counter-protesters prior to the arrival of members of the Ku Klux Klan to rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Members of the Ku Klux Klan rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Counter-protesters help a man affected by pepper gas as police try to disperse them, after members of the Ku Klux Klan rallied in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Police, clergy and free speech observers protect a man wearing a Confederate flag as a cape after he was surrounded by counter-protesters prior to the arrival of members of the Ku Klux Klan to rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Riot police protect members of the Ku Klux Klan from counter-protesters as they arrive to rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TEMPLATE OUT
Counter-protesters lock arms in the middle of a street as police try to disperse them, after members of the Ku Klux Klan rallied in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Members of the Ku Klux Klan rally in opposition to city proposals to remove or make changes to Confederate monuments, such as the statue of General Stonewall Jackson above them, in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Members of the Ku Klux Klan, standing near a tomato and and an orange that had been thrown at them by counter-protesters, hold a sign as they rally in support of Confederate monuments in Charlottesville, Virginia, U.S. July 8, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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