Apple added a revealing word to its official business strategy

If you ask Apple CEO Tim Cook what aspect of Apple's business investors should be paying more attention to, it's Apple's services business.

Apple's services business, comprised mainly of Apple's App Store and subscriptions like Apple Music and iCloud, is now the second-largest line on Apple's income statement with quarterly revenue of $7.3 billion, after the iPhone.

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"Over the last 12 months, our Services business has become the size of a Fortune 100 company, a milestone we've reached even sooner than we had expected," Cook said during Apple's earnings conference call earlier this week.

As a sign of how much services means to Apple, the company added a line about it to its official business strategy included in an SEC filing on Wednesday.

"The Company believes ongoing investment in research and development ("R&D"), marketing and advertising is critical to the development and sale of innovative products, services and technologies," Apple wrote in the filing.

Tim Cook - Apple CEO

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SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 9: Apple CEO Tim Cook gestures on stage during an Apple special event at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California. Apple Inc. announced the new MacBook as well as more details on the much anticipated Apple Watch, the tech giant's entry into the rapidly growing wearable technology segment as well (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 9: Apple CEO Tim Cook stands in front of an MacBook on display after an Apple special event at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California. Apple Inc. announced the new MacBook as well as more details on the much anticipated Apple Watch, the tech giant's entry into the rapidly growing wearable technology segment as well (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - MARCH 9: Apple CEO Tim Cook waves from stage after an Apple special event at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on March 9, 2015 in San Francisco, California. Apple Inc. announced the new MacBook as well as more details on the much anticipated Apple Watch, the tech giant's entry into the rapidly growing wearable technology segment as well (Photo by Stephen Lam/Getty Images)
Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., right, waves to customers while leaving the sales launch for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus at the Apple Inc. store in Palo Alto, California, U.S., on Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Apple Inc.'s stores attracted long lines of shoppers for the debut of the latest iPhones, indicating healthy demand for the bigger-screen smartphones. The larger iPhone 6 Plus is already selling out at some stores across the U.S. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., left, and the band U2 gesture during a product announcement at Flint Center in Cupertino, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. Apple Inc. unveiled redesigned iPhones with bigger screens, overhauling its top-selling product in an event that gives the clearest sign yet of the company's product direction under Cook. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
CUPERTINO, CA - OCTOBER 16: Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks during an Apple special event on October 16, 2014 in Cupertino, California. Apple unveiled the new iPad Air 2 tablet, iPad Mini 3 and a Retina iMac. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - JUNE 02: Apple CEO Tim Cook walks off stage after speaking during the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center on June 2, 2014 in San Francisco, California. Tim Cook kicked off the annual WWDC which is typically a showcase for upcoming updates to Apple hardware and software. The conference runs through June 6. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
BEIJING, CHINA - JANUARY 17: (CHINA OUT) Tim Cook, Chief Executive Officer of Apple Inc., visits a China Mobile shop to celebrate the launch of iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C on China Mobile's fourth generation (4G) network on January 17, 2014 in Beijing, China. Apple Inc. and China Mobile Limited, the world's largest carrier with over 760 million subscribers, signed a deal on December 23, 2013 after six years of negotiations. (Photo by ChinaFotoPress/ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)
Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., displays the iPad Air for a photograph during a press event at the Yerba Buena Center in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013. Apple Inc. introduced new iPads in time for holiday shoppers, as it battles to stay ahead of rivals in the increasingly crowded market for tablet computers. Photographer: Noah Berger/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Previously, the word "services" was not included in that sentence.

Apple's description of its business strategy does not change drastically from quarter-to-quarter. Apple's description has stayed largely the same since 2014, with minor updates, mostly to the names of products.

Apple also added a mention of services to an paragraph about Apple's research and development expenses in the same filing.

"The Company continues to believe that focused investments in R&D are critical to its future growth and competitive position in the marketplace, and to the development of new and updated products and services that are central to the Company's core business strategy," Apple wrote in the filing.

Apple's services business, largely driven by the 30% cut Apple takes when people buy apps and in-app purchases from its App Store, is seen as critical for the company as iPhone sales growth has slowed in recent years. People are hanging onto their iPhones for longer, and there isn't as much room to expand as there was a few years ago.

Apple products over the years

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Apple products over the years
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Apple products over the years
UNITED STATES - NOVEMBER 30: The Apple II was designed and built by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak by the end of 1976. It was the first mass-marketed personal computer. The Apple II was a single-board computer like the Apple I, but the Apple II was much improved, going several steps further than its predecessor. The Apple II had the BASIC (Beginner's All Symbolic Instruction Code) programming language built in, and it had the ability to display text and graphics in colour. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Finnish-American businessman Mike Markkula (born Armas Clifford Markkula Jr) poses with the first Apple II computer and its carrying case, April 1977. Markkula was one the first investors (and one-third owner of) Apple, Inc, and its second CEO. (Photo by Tom Munnecke/Getty Images)
View of the Apple II computer at its unveiling at the first West Coast Computer Faire in Brooks Hall, San Francisco, California, April 16th or 17th, 1977. (Photo by Tom Munnecke/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - NOVEMBER 30: The Apple II was designed and built by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak by the end of 1976. It was the first mass-marketed personal computer. The Apple II was a single-board computer like the Apple I, but the Apple II was much improved, going several steps further than its predecessor. The Apple II had the BASIC (Beginner's All Symbolic Instruction Code) programming language built in, and it had the ability to display text and graphics in colour. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
IRELAND - MARCH 09: The Apple III computer was first introduced in 1980 and was intended to be aimed at business users. It was the first Apple machine to incorporate a built-in 5.25 inch floppy disk drive and high-resolution graphics built into the motherboard. Unfortunately the machines suffered from numerous problems and sold poorly. An improved and lower-priced Apple III was launched in 1981, followed by a III+ in 1983, but the computers continued to be unpopular, and production ceased in 1985. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
386902 03: President of the products division of Apple Computer Inc. Jean-Louis Gassee poses with Apple Computers January 27, 1986 in California. Gassee started the French subsidiary of Apple which has become the largest business unit outside of US for Apple. (Photo by Ed Kashi/Liaison)
UNITED STATES - JULY 26: Apple Mac portable computer model M5126, made by Apple Computers Inc, USA. The Apple Macintosh was designed by Steve Jobs to be as 'user-friendly' as possible. Jobs wanted to produce an 'appliance computer' that clients could unpack, plug in and start to use with very little computer knowledge. It was also designed to use a graphical display rather than the standard text-based display previously used. The Mac was an instant success and continued to be popular as Jobs had ensured that plenty of computer software had been designed for use with the machine. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
382786 02: A customer at Apple dealer CompUSA in Rockville, Maryland, carts away an Apple MacIntosh iMac computer on the day the computer first officially went on sale. The much-anticipated iMac is seen by many as crucial to Apple's recovery. (photo by Sean Gallup
CUPERTINO, UNITED STATES: Foreign media photograph and film the new Apple Computer iMac Special Edition after Apple interim CEO and co-founder Steve Jobs introduced it during an event in Cupertino, California, 05 October, 1999. AFP PHOTO John G. Mabanglo (Photo credit should read JOHN G. MABANGLO/AFP/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - MARCH 31: 1st Apple Macintosh (Mac) 128K computer, released january 24, 1984 by Steve Jobs (Photo by Apic/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MARCH 09: Apple�s Lisa was the first computer to use a Graphical User Interface (GUI). Incorporating the powerful Motorola 68000 processor, and a mouse and pull-down menus, Lisa was intended by Apple�s founder, Steve Jobs, to set the technological standard and become the market leader in personal computers. Unfortunately, at just under $10,000 when launched in 1983, the price was too high for most potential buyers, but the innovations of the Lisa led directly to Apple�s successful Macintosh. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JULY 26: Apple Mac portable computer model M5126, made by Apple Computers Inc, USA. The Apple Macintosh was designed by Steve Jobs to be as 'user-friendly' as possible. Jobs wanted to produce an 'appliance computer' that clients could unpack, plug in and start to use with very little computer knowledge. It was also designed to use a graphical display rather than the standard text-based display previously used. The Mac was an instant success and continued to be popular as Jobs had ensured that plenty of computer software had been designed for use with the machine. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JULY 26: Apple Mac portable computer model M5126 in case with user manuals, made by Apple Computers Inc, USA. The Apple Macintosh was designed by Steve Jobs to be as 'user-friendly' as possible. Jobs wanted to produce an 'appliance computer' that clients could unpack, plug in and start to use with very little computer knowledge. It was also designed to use a graphical display rather than the standard text-based display previously used. The Mac was an instant success and continued to be popular as Jobs had ensured that plenty of computer software had been designed for use with the machine. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
JAPAN - JULY 27: Made by Apple Computers Inc. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
190662 02: Children use Apple Computers in their classroom June 1994 in San Francisco, CA. Apple Computer Inc. designs, manufactures and markets personal computers and related personal computing and communicating solutions for the sale primarily to education, creative, consumer, and business customers. (Photo by James D. Wilson/Liaison)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 02: This was the first computer made by Apple Computers Inc, which became one of the fastest growing companies in history, launching a number of innovative and influential computer hardware and software products. Most home computer users in the 1970s were hobbyists who designed and assembled their own machines. The Apple I, devised in a bedroom by Steve Wozniak, Steven Jobs and Ron Wayne, was a basic circuit board to which enthusiasts would add display units and keyboards. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Apple Computers introduced the Power Mac(TM) G4, its new line of professional desktop computers which deliver supercomputer-level performance on a desktop at the Seybold conference in San Francisco August 31, 1999. Apple's new G4 chip will ship in 400-, 450- and 500-MHz systems. (photo courtesy of Apple Computers, Inc.)
375078 01: Apple's Latest Product The Imac. The New Personal Computer, Which Goes On Sale On Aug. 15, 1998 Has Already Won Popular Acclaim For Its Creative Design And Its Refreshing Departure From The Computer Industry Standard Of Boring Beige Boxes. The Imac Combines The Computer And The Monitor In One Unit That Brings To Mind A Beach Ball, Making It, In Effect, An Updated Version Of The Original One-Piece Macintosh. (Photo By Getty Images)
Apple Computer Inc. Intensified Its Challenge To Conventional Computer Design January 5, 1999 By Unveiling The Newly Redesigned G3 Tower With A User Friendly Clamshell Design For Easy Access. The Company Also Lowered The Price On The Imac By $100 To $1,200 And Boosted Its Processing Power And Storage Capacity. Steve Jobs, Apple's Interim Chief Executive, Told The Macworld Computer Show That Apple Expected To Report Its Fifth Consecutive Profitable Quarter Next Wednesday, Furthering Its Recent Recovery From Two Years Of Losses. (Photo By Getty Images)
375076 01: Apple Computer Inc. Intensified Its Challenge To Conventional Computer Design January 5, 1999 By Unveiling Five Bright New Colors For Its Unusual-Looking Imac Desktop Machine. The Company Also Lowered The Price On The Imac By $100 To $1,200 And Boosted Its Processing Power And Storage Capacity. Steve Jobs, Apple's Interim Chief Executive, Told The Macworld Computer Show That Apple Expected To Report Its Fifth Consecutive Profitable Quarter Next Wednesday, Furthering Its Recent Recovery From Two Years Of Losses. (Photo By Getty Images)
MAKUHARI, JAPAN: Japanese Macintosh fans try to operate five color variations iMac computers at the MacWorld Expo Tokyo at the Makuhari Messe in suburban Tokyo 18 February. Some 20,000 people visited Japan's largest computer exhibition. AFP PHOTO/Yoshikazu TSUNO (ELECTRONIC IMAGE) (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
Apple Computers Has Introduced A Family Of All-New Imac Computers Oct. 5, 1999. The New Family Includes Imac, Imac Dv (Pictured) For 'Digital Video' And Imac Dv Special Edition , Which Comes In A New Clear Graphite-Colored Enclosure. (Courtesy Of Apple Via Newsmakers) 358515 001 10/05/99 Apple Computers Has Introduced A Family Of All-New Imac Computers Oct. 5, 1999. The New Family Includes Imac, Imac Dv (Pictured) For 'Digital Video' And Imac Dv Special Edition, Which Comes In A New Clear Graphite-Colored Enclosure. (Photo By Getty Images)
373463 02: Apple introduced the Power Mac G4 Cube July 19, 2000, an entirely new class of computer that delivers the performance of a Power Mac G4 in an eight inch cube suspended in a stunning crystal-clear enclosure. The G4 Cube is less than one fourth the size of most PCs. The Power Mac G4 Cube uses a revolutionary cooling design that does not require a fan, so it runs in virtual silence. Cooling is provided by the air flowing through the Cube's center vertical cooling channel. In addition, the Cube's entire electronics assembly can be easily lifted out of its enclosure within seconds, providing access to every major component. (Photo courtesy of Apple)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 09: At the time of its release, the Apple G4 was the most powerful computer Apple had ever made. It was powered by the G4e chip from Motorola, which improved speed while reducing heat generated by the processor. It contained a 60GB Ultra ATA hard disk, optional internal zip drive and 256MB RAM built-in (expandable to 1.5GB). The G4's SuperDrive enabled it to read and write to CD-R and CD-RW disks, and also to new DVD-R disks. The first computer mouse was invented by Dr Doug Engelbart at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI), California, in 1963-1964. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
Apple Computers Has Introduced A Family Of All-New Imac Computers Oct. 5, 1999. The New Family Includes Imac, Imac Dv (For 'Digital Video') And Imac Dv Special Edition (Pictured), Which Comes In A New Clear Graphite-Colored Enclosure. (Courtesy Of Apple Via Newsmakers) 358515 002 10/05/99 Apple Computers Has Introduced A Family Of All-New Imac Computers Oct. 5, 1999. The New Family Includes Imac, Imac Dv (Pictured) For 'Digital Video' And Imac Dv Special Edition, Which Comes In A New Clear Graphite-Colored Enclosure. (Photo By Getty Images)
TOKYO, JAPAN: Japanese youths inspect the iMac DV from US computer maker Apple Computer Inc,. at a department store in Tokyo 16 October 1999. The firm started selling the lap-top iBook and desktop iMac DV in Japan today at a price of 198,000 yen (1,860 dollars). AFP PHOTO/Toru YAMANAKA (Photo credit should read TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)
MAKUHARI, JAPAN: Japanese youngsters check out Apple's latest product, the iBook Special Edition, at the Macworld Expo/Tokyo 2000 in Makuhari, suburban Tokyo 16 February 2000. The exhibition runs from 16-19 February at the Makuhari Messe. (ELECTRONIC IMAGE) AFP PHOTO/KAZUHIRO NOGI (Photo credit should read KAZUHIRO NOGI/AFP/Getty Images)
373781 03: Mark Mineart of New York eyes Apple''s new G4 Cube July 21, 2000 at the Macworld Conference and Expo at the Javits Center in New York City. Apple debuted several new products at their annual showcase. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Newsmakers)
378394 02: Over 250 exhibitors are showcasing solutions and services for the Macintosh platform September 13, 2000 at Apple Expo Paris in Paris, France. The expo featured the release of Apple's Mac OS X Public Beta and the introduction of a new iBook(TM) line in all new colors. (Photo by Newsmakers)
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES: Chris Lincoln of Apple Computer (R) demonstrates the new G4 Titanium Powerbook at the MacWorld Expo 09 January 2001 in San Francisco. Apple unveiled new configurations for the G4 desktops as well as new audio and DVD software for the Apple MacIntoshes. AFP PHOTO/John G. MABANGLO (Photo credit should read JOHN G. MABANGLO/AFP/Getty Images)
384268 01: The new Apple Titanium PowerBook G4 is seen in profile in this handout photo. The laptop computer is one inch thick and weighs 5.3 pounds. (Photo by Apple/Newsmakers)
388795 03: Apple introduces the new iBook, May 1, 2001 in Cupertino, CA. The 4.9 pound iBook is the lightest and smallest full-featured consumer and education notebook on the market today. (Photo courtesy of Apple/Newsmakers)
Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds a copy of Apple's new operating system Mac OS X during his keynote address at the World Wide Developers Conference in San Jose, California 21 May 2001. AFP PHOTO/John G. MABANGLO (Photo credit should read JOHN G. MABANGLO/AFP/Getty Images)
392143 14: A visitor uses his new G4 Powerbook laptop at the Mac World Expo show July 19, 2001 in New York City. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
396388 03: Apple Computer Inc. unveiled a new portable music player, the iPod MP3 music player October 23, 2001 at an event in Cupertino, Calif. The device can hold up to 1,000 songs in digital form. (Photo Courtesy of Apple Corp. via Getty Images)
399358 06: A man touches the Apple iPod mp3 music player on display during the Macworld Conference and Convention January 8, 2002 at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. The conference officially opened today after Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivered a keynote address the day before, at which he announced the arrival of the redesigned iMac. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
402687 01: Visitors test out the new Apple iMac computer and iPod on the opening day of the Macworld Expo March 20, 2002 in Tokyo, Japan. The annual conference will be held until March 23, and is expected to draw 180,000 visitors to the show. (Photo by Koichi Kamoshida/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, UNITED STATES: Journalist get a first look at Apple's new iMac after CEO Steve Jobs gave his keynote speech at the MacWorld Expo 07 January 2002 in San Francisco, California. The new iMac features a white domed base with a 15-inch flat panel monitor floating above it, attached by a telescopic arm.FP PHOTO /John G. MABANGLO (Photo credit should read JOHN G. MABANGLO/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK - JULY 17: A new 20 GB version of the iPod music player is seen at Macworld Conference and Expo July 17, 2002 in New York City. Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs demonstrated the MAC OSX 10.2 and the Jaguar system during his keynote address. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 07: This USB cable was used for connecting the keyboard to the computer. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 07: At the time of its release, the Apple G4 was the most powerful computer Apple had ever made. It was powered by the G4e chip from Motorola, which improved speed while reducing heat generated by the processor. It contained a 60GB Ultra ATA hard disk, optional internal zip drive and 256MB RAM built-in (expandable to 1.5GB). The G4's SuperDrive enabled it to read and write to CD-R and CD-RW disks, and also to new DVD-R disks. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 07: This USB cable was used for connecting the keyboard to the computer. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - JANUARY 7: Macworld attendees pass in front of the Macworld sign January 7, 2003 in San Francisco. Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced announced new 17-inch and 12-inch powerbooks as well as several new software updates. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - JANUARY 7: People look at new 12-inch and 17-inch power books at Macworld January 7, 2003 in San Francisco. Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced the new powerbooks as well as several new software updates. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
TOKYO, JAPAN: The first customer (C) of the newly opened Apple Computer's Ginza shop exchanges high fives with apple store employees at the opening ceremony of the new shop, Apple's first direct operating shop outside the US, in central Tokyo, 30 November 2003. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - JANUARY 6: A new iPod mini displayed at Macworld January 6, 2004 in San Francisco. Jobs announced several new products including the new iLife 4 software and the Mini iPod. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 24: Apple iPod mini's. (Photo By Douglas Graham/Roll Call/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - JANUARY 6: A crowd gathers at the Macworld expo January 6, 2004 in San Francisco. Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced several new products including the new iLife 4 software and the Mini iPod. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
LONDON - JULY 16: A Model displays the new Apple iPod product at the Apple iPod mini press launch on July 16, 2004 in London. (Photo by Steve Finn/Getty Images)
UNDATED: This undated Apple Inc. handout photo shows the new iPod, released on July 19, 2004. The latest model of the portable music player, which has an extended battery life up to 12 hours and a new shuffle feature, is available in 20 and 40 gigabytes models. (Photo by Apple via Getty Images)
UNDATED: This image released by Apple on October 26, 2004 shows the new iPod U2 Special Edition. The new U2 iPod holds up to 5,000 songs and features a black enclosure with a red Click Wheel and custom engraving of U2 band member signatures. (Photo by Apple via Getty Images)
CHICAGO - DECEMBER 20: iPod music players sit on display at an Apple retail store December 20, 2004 in Chicago, Illinois. The music players are one of the hottest gifts this holiday season. With many places already sold out of the item they are proving increasingly difficult to find. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - JANUARY 11: The new iPod Shuffle is seen on display at the 2005 Macworld Expo January 11, 2005 in San Francisco, California. Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced several new products during his show opening keynote including the new Mac Mini personal computer starting at $499 and the iPod Shuffle MP3 player starting at $99. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - APRIL 1: A shopper checks out iPod MP3 players at an Apple dealership April 1, 2005 in Berlin, Germany. The iPod has been a goldmine for computer maker Apple, who's share price has catapulted to new highs in recent months. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - SEPTEMBER 22: Models display the latest iPod nano at a press launch on September 22, 2005 in Seoul, South Korea. The latest release from Apple features a 4 GB model with the capacity to store up to 1,000 songs or 25,000 photographs. The iPod nano weighs 1.5 ounces and, measures only 3.5 x 1.6 x 0.27 inches. The 4 GB model will be available on the Korean market at $290 USD and the 2 GB version available for $230 USD. (Photo by Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)
SAN JOSE, CA - OCTOBER 12: A man holds a new iPod with video capabilities October 12, 2005 in San Jose, California. Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced a new iPod that plays video, a new iMac and new version of iTunes that allows people to purchase videos and television shows. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 11: Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Computer Inc., unveils an iPod Shuffle at the Macworld Conference and Expo in San Francisco, California on January 11, 2005. The iPod Shuffle, available immediately in 512mb and 1gb versions, uses a less-costly type of computer memory and will start at less than $100. That compares with the $249, 4-gigabyte mini, which has a traditional hard-drive memory and holds 1,000 songs. (Photo by Kimberly White/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 22: Mac mini computers await buyers at a San Francisco, California Apple Computer retail location on Saturday, January 22, 2005. (Photo by Noah Berger/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
NEW YORK - APRIL 29: Apple enthusiasts wait in lines outside of the Apple Store to buy the company's latest computer operating system, Mac OS 10.4 'Tiger' April 29, 2005 in New York City. Apple's eagerly-awaited new operating system introduces a host of new features to the Macintosh computers. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
CHICAGO - APRIL 29: Customers check out Apple computer's O.S. 10.4 'Tiger' operating system at the Apple retail store April 29, 2005 in Chicago, Illinois. Apple released the operating system for sale in the United States today to replace the existing 'Panther' operating system. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
SYDNEY, NSW - AUGUST 17: An iPod MP3 player screen displays the loudness option August 17, 2005 in Sydney, Australia. Research conducted by the National Acoustic Laboratories, to be released by the Australian Federal Government today, has found that up to a 25% of people who use iPods or other portable music devices will suffer from hearing problems as a result of listening to their players at 'excessive and damaging' levels. (Photo Illustration by Ian Waldie/Getty Images)
SEOUL, REPUBLIC OF KOREA: Women display new Apple Computer mouses during its sales promotion in Seoul, 18 August 2005. Apple Computer Korea began selling the new 'Mighty Mouse' products with left, right and side buttons and scroll ball at 59,000 won (57.92 USD) in South Korea market. The Apple Computer mouse is compatible with IBM computers. AFP PHOTO/JUNG YEON-JE (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - JANUARY 10: Macworld attendees look at the new iMac with Intel Core Duo processor on display at the 2006 Macworld January 10, 2006 in San Francisco, California. Jobs announced a new iMac with Intel Core Duo processor as well as the new MacBook Pro laptop. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
CUPERTINO, CA - FEBRUARY 28: The new the Mac Mini Intel Core computer is displayed at a special Apple event February 28, 2006 in Cupertino, California. The Mac Mini will come in a Intel Core Solo and Core Duo Processor. (Photo by Peter DaSilva/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 28: Steve Jobs, Apple Computer chief executive officer, stands next to the new iPod Hi-Fi stereo system, left, and the new Mac Mini PC in Cupertino, California on Tuesday, February 28, 2006. Apple Computer Inc., maker of iPod music players and Macintosh personal computers, introduced a home stereo and new Mac Mini PC designed to give the company a bigger foothold in living rooms. (Photo by Kimberly White/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 09: An Apple iPhone sits on display during MacWorld in San Francisco, California, Tuesday, January 9, 2007. Apple Computer Inc. Chief Executive Officer Steve Jobs introduced a mobile phone based on its best-selling iPod device, seeking to extend the company's dominance beyond music players. Jobs also introduced Apple TV, a $299 set-top box enabling users to send movies, TV shows and other media files from their computers to their televisions. (Photo by Eric Slomanson/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Macworld attendee Kurt Sakaeda looks at the new Apple MacBook Air ultra thin laptop at the MacWorld Conference & Expo in San Francisco 15 January 2008. MacBook Air measures 0.16 inches (0.4cm) at its thinnest point while its maximum height of 0.76 (1.93cm) inches is less than the thinnest point on competing notebooks. AFP PHOTO/Tony AVELAR (Photo credit should read TONY AVELAR/AFP/Getty Images)
CUPERTINO, CA - OCTOBER 14: New MacBook and MacBook Pro laptops are seen on display after a special announcement event at Apple Headquarters October 14, 2008 in Cupertino, California. Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced new versions of the MacBook Pro and MacBook laptop computers. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JUNE 08: Bertrand Serlet, senior vice president of software engineering at Apple Inc., talks about the new Mac OS X Snow Leopard operating system during the Apple World Wide Developers Conference (WWDC) in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Monday, June 8, 2009. Apple Inc. introduced a faster model of the iPhone and cut the price of its current version, and also unveiled new MacBook laptops with lower prices. (Photo by Tony Avelar/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - FEBRUARY 17: In this photo illustration, a view of the back of an Apple ipad tablet shows it's unique serial number and Apple logo on February 17, 2011 in London, England. Apple sold two million ipads in the first two months of their launch in 2010. Worldwide iPad sales are expected to amount to 20 million in 2012. (Photo Illustration by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - FEBRUARY 17: In this photo illustration, an Apple ipad tablet displays apps on it's home screen on February 17, 2011 in London, England. Apple sold two million ipads in the first two months of their launch in 2010. Worldwide iPad sales are expected to amount to 20 million in 2012. (Photo Illustration by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - MARCH 25:The iPad 2 is launched at the Apple Store, Regent Street on March 25, 20011 in London, England. The latest iPad went on sale in the UK at 5:00pm. (Photo by Ming Yeung/Getty Images)
Customers look at iPads 2 displayed on March 25, 2011 at the opening of the Apple's store in the historic Opera district. The iPad 2 was on sale today at 16:00 GMT in 25 countries in Europe, Oceania and Americas, two weeks after its official launch in the United States. AFP PHOTO MARTIN BUREAU (Photo credit should read MARTIN BUREAU/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama carries a computer tablet as he walks from the Oval Office to a waiting motorcade on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, on August 13, 2011, prior to playing golf at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
CUPERTINO, CA - OCTOBER 04: Apple's Senior Vice President of Worldwide product marketing Phil Schiller speaks about the new clock face for the iPod Nano during introduction of the new iPhone 4s at the company’s headquarters October 4, 2011 in Cupertino, California. The announcement marks the first time new CEO Tim Cook introduced a new product since Apple co-founder Steve Jobs resigned in August. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
CUPERTINO, CA - OCTOBER 04: Apple's Senior Vice President of Worldwide product marketing Phil Schiller speaks about the iPod touch and iPod Nano during introduction of the new iPhone 4s at the company’s headquarters October 4, 2011 in Cupertino, California. The announcement marks the first time new CEO Tim Cook introduced a new product since Apple co-founder Steve Jobs resigned in August. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
Toshihiro Okada, 79, uses an Apple Inc. iPad at a computer club in Tokyo, Japan, on Friday, Aug. 6, 2010. James Cordwell, a technology analyst at Atlantic Equities Service in London, said the iPad's appeal to the elderly is helping the company reach beyond its traditional base of younger customers and fend off Google Inc.'s Android mobile-device operating system, which targets more technologically savvy users. Photographer: Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg via Getty Images
The new Apple Inc. iPod Nano is displayed during an Apple product unveiling event in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2010. Apple, building on its dominance in the music industry, introduced new iPods, added a social networking feature to its iTunes software, and unveiled a new Apple TV set-top box that offers television and movie rentals. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Apple Inc.'s iPad 2 tablet computers sit on display at the company's store on Regents Street in London, U.K., on Friday, March 25, 2011. Apple Inc. began selling its iPad 2 to queues of consumers in Australia and New Zealand today, as part of a release in 25 countries including the U.K., France, Switzerland and Germany. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An Apple Inc. iPad 2 tablet computer sits on the counter at the company's store on Regents Street in London, U.K., on Friday, March 25, 2011. Apple Inc. began selling its iPad 2 to queues of consumers in Australia and New Zealand today, as part of a release in 25 countries including the U.K., France, Switzerland and Germany. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A white Apple Inc. iPhone 4 sits arranged for a photograph at a mobile phone store in London, U.K., on Thursday, April 28, 2011. Apple Inc. may face greater scrutiny in the European Union than the U.S. as regulators investigate possible data-privacy lapses betraying the location of iPhone and iPad users. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A KT Corp. employee looks at Apple Inc.'s iPad 2 tablet computer at KT Corp.'s Gwanghwamun retail store, in Seoul, South Korea, on Friday, April 29, 2011. Samsung Electronics Co., the second-largest maker of mobile phones, broadened its patent-infringement dispute with Apple Inc. by suing the iPhone creator in the U.S. a week after making claims in Asia and Europe. Photographer: SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An Apple Inc. macbook is displayed in one of the company's stores in New York, U.S., on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2011. Steve Jobs, departing as Apple Inc.’s chief executive officer after a more than 9,000-percent share gain since 1997, leaves the company he co-founded in the hands of deputies to prove they can keep building best-selling products that change how people compute and communicate. Photographer: Scott Eells/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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UNITED STATES - JULY 24: Apple MP3 player capable of storing and playing music, photograph and video files. (Photo by SSPL/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO - JANUARY 13: Fashionable iPod covers by iDoll are seen on display at the Macworld Conference and Expo January 13, 2006 in San Francisco, California. iPod accessories are popular items to sell at Macworld. For example, Apple Computer, Inc. sold near 14 million of iPods during the 2005 holiday sales quarter, a larger amount than a year ago. Overall Apple leads the market, reportedly, with near 42 million iPods sold, more than three quarters of that amount sold in the year of 2005. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Steve Jobs, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., demonstrates the Apple iPad tablet during its debut at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Theater in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010. Apple Inc., trying to expand beyond the Macintosh, iPod and iPhone, introduced the iPad, a tablet computer with a touch screen. Photographer: Tony Avelar/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Dan Sze, physician at Stanford Medical Hospital, tests out an Apple iPad tablet computer following its debut during an Apple event at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Theater in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010. Apple Inc., seeking to revolutionize the publishing business in the same way the iPod transformed the music industry, unveiled a tablet computer starting at $499, a price that was 50 percent lower than some analysts predicted. Photographer: Tony Avelar/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 31: TV personality Stephen Colbert holding an ipad speaks onstage during the 52nd Annual GRAMMY Awards held at Staples Center on January 31, 2010 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Larry Busacca/Getty Images for NARAS)
NEW YORK - APRIL 03: An early customer emerges from the Apple store on Fifth Avenue with Apple Inc's new iPad on April 3, 2010 in New York City. Hundreds lined up in front of the technology company's flagship New York store to be among the first in the world to acquire the device. The much heralded iPad looks to be a bridge between a laptop and smartphone. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 07: Lighting Designer Frank Hollenkamp uses his iPad to shoot video of the Tribute in Lights ahead of the tenth anniversary of the September 11 terrorist attacks on September 7, 2011 in New York City. The Tribute in Light is comprised of 88 1-degree beams of 7000 watt searchlights focused into the sky near the site of the World Trade Center in remembrance of the September 11 attacks. (Photo by Andreas Gebhard/Getty Images)
Steve Jobs, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., holds an Apple iPad tablet during its debut at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Theater in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010. Apple Inc., trying to expand beyond the Macintosh, iPod and iPhone, introduced the iPad, a tablet computer with a touch screen. Photographer: Tony Avelar/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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So, services represents a critical opportunity for Apple to make more money from its existing base of customers.

Widely-followed technology analyst Ben Thompson wrote on Thursday that it appeared as if Apple's attempts to lock its customers into its own services was "steadily increasing."

He writes:

Indeed, Apple's attempt at services lock-in is steadily increasing: HomePod supports only Apple Music and Siri, CarPlay supports only Siri and Apple Maps, iOS still doesn't let one change default applications. None of these decisions are based on delivering a superior experience, the key to Apple's differentiation with a hardware-based business model; all are based on securing an ongoing relationship with the company that can be monetized over time.

But Apple's new insistence that R&D spending include services suggests the company knows it needs to deliver new services that are worth paying for — perhaps, something like the internet-TV subscription it's been rumored to be considering for years.

Or, Apple could also introduce new products under the iCloud banner beyond cloud storage — perhaps something dealing with security and identity, or something else that takes advantage of Apple's tight integration of software and hardware — something Cook says only Apple can do.

Regardless of what happens with Apple's services, investing in it through research and development and advertising is now part of Apple's official business strategy.

RELATED: How Steve Jobs saved Apple from disaster

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How Steve Jobs saved Apple from disaster
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How Steve Jobs saved Apple from disaster

In late 1996, Apple announced plans to bring cofounder Steve Jobs back into the fold 11 years after he left the company by acquiring his startup NeXT for $429 million — just in time for Jobs to join then-Apple CEO Gil Amelio on stage at January 1997's Macworld Expo, a convention for Mac enthusiasts, as a keynote speaker.

(Photo by Lou Dematteis / Reuters)

Steve Jobs' NeXT found its niche selling graphically intensive PCs with cutting-edge screens to universities and banks. Apple hoped that Jobs would revitalize the Mac maker, whose stock had hit a 12-year low under Amelio's leadership and experienced crippling losses.

(Photo by Ann E. Yow-Dyson/Getty Images)

On July 4, 1997, Jobs persuaded Apple's board to oust Amelio and make Jobs the interim, and then permanent, CEO. In August 1997, Jobs took the stage at another Macworld Expo to announce that Apple had taken a $150 million investment from its long-time rivals at Microsoft. "We need all the help we can get," Jobs said, to boos from the audience.

(Photo by Jim Bourg / Reuters)

In fact, by 1997, Apple's financial situation was so dire that Dell CEO and founder Michael Dell, one of Microsoft's biggest partners, once said that if he were in Jobs' shoes, he'd "shut it down and give the money back to the shareholders."

(Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

But in early 1998, at yet another Macworld Expo in San Francisco, Jobs ended his keynote with the first of his soon-to-be ubiquitous "One More Thing" announcements: Thanks to Jobs' product direction and Microsoft's help, Apple was finally profitable again.

(Photo via Reuters)

Also in 1998, Jobs hired an executive named Tim Cook to head up Apple's worldwide operations. Cook would stay with the company, eventually becoming chief operating officer.

(Photo via REUTERS/Kim White)

Jobs needed the help. At this point, Jobs was CEO of both Apple and Pixar Studios, of which he had become chief investor in 1986 after funding it with $10 million. Jobs is actually credited as an executive producer on 1995's "Toy Story."

(Photo by Gabe Palacio via Getty Images)

Behind the scenes, Jobs was making some big changes for Apple employees, too: Under Jobs, the Apple cafeteria got much better food, and employees were barred from bringing their pets to the campus. He wanted everybody focused on Apple.

(Photo via REUTERS/Noah Berger)

Almost exactly a year after that Microsoft cash came in, in August 1998, Apple would release the iMac, an all-in-one, high-performance computer codesigned by Jobs and new talent Jonathan Ive.

(Photo via REUTERS/Mousse Mousse)

The iMac came in multiple colors, the first time the world would get a taste of Ive's computer design sensibilities. This first iMac was a much-needed hit, selling 800,000 units in its first five months.

(Photo via Reuters)

Jobs had originally pitched the name "MacMan" for this new Mac. It was Ken Segall, an executive with Apple's ad agency at the time, who suggested "iMac." The "i" is for "internet," since it took only two steps to connect to the web, in case you were wondering. But Apple has also said it stands for "individuality" and "innovation."

(Photo via Reuters)

The naming scheme would stick around. In 1999, Apple introduced the "iBook," a funky machine that tried to replicate the iMac's success as an entry-level laptop.

(Photo via Reuters)

But Apple's next really dramatic move would come in 2001, when Mac OS X was released. Where Apple had been treading water with Mac OS 8 and 9, OS X was a drastic redesign, based largely on the Unix and BSD technology at the core of Jobs' NeXT Computers.

(Photo by Lou Dematteis / Reuters)

From here, things started moving fast and furious for Apple. Later in 2001 Apple would open its first retail stores, in Virginia and California.

(Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images).

In October, Jobs' Apple would take its first steps beyond the Mac with the iPod, a digital music player that promised "1,000 songs in your pocket." The iPod actually got off to a slow start, largely because it started at a pricey $399 and worked only on Macs.

(Photo via REUTERS/Susan Ragan SR/SV)

In 2003, Apple opened up the iTunes Music Store, with its novel pricing model of $0.99 per song, to turn the iPod into the center of a digital media universe. Around the same time, both iTunes and the iPod hit Windows, jump-starting Apple's music play.

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

But in 2003 Jobs received some news that would cast a shadow over the good times at Apple: He had pancreatic cancer. He kept it a secret until sharing the news with employees in 2004.

(Photo via REUTERS/Matt Dunham MD/ACM)

In just six years, Apple had gone from a laughing stock in tech to a serious player. And from 2003 to 2006, it went from around $6 per share to about $80 per share. Apple was still lagging behind Microsoft in marketshare, but it was making serious money. Celebrities like U2 and John Mayer were tapped to help out at company events.

(Photo via REUTERS/Monica Davey MD/JDP)

Over the years, Jobs' Apple had been asked to extend its design expertise to creating a new touch-screen device. In 2004, Jobs convened Project Purple, under his supervision with Ive in charge, to develop a touch-screen device. Originally, Jobs was envisioning a tablet, but it eventually turned into a concept for a cell phone.

(Photo by Matt Dunham / Reuters)

The iPod lineup slowly grew, too. By 2005, there was the iPod, the iPod Mini, the iPad Nano, and the iPod Shuffle, in descending size order. That same year also saw the introduction of the first iPod with video, alongside the ability to buy movies and videos on iTunes.

(Photo by Dino Vournas / Reuters)

In 2005, Motorola introduced the ROKR, a phone that it made in partnership with Apple. It was the first phone that could play music from the iTunes Music Store. But it was limited to being able to store only 100 songs because of a limit in its software.

(Photo by Kim Kulish/Corbis via Getty Images)

In 2006, Jobs made a big move that probably saved the Mac. Former CEO John Sculley had banked Apple's future on the pricey PowerPC processor, while the major Windows PC manufacturers stuck with Intel. It meant Macs were both more expensive to buy and harder to develop software for. But in 2006, Apple introduced the first MacBook Pro alongside a new iMac, both of which came with Intel processors.

(Photo by Lou Dematteis / Reuters)

It also meant that for the first time you could install Windows on a Mac.

(Photo by John Schults / Reuters)

Apple was on the upswing. In 2006, the flagship Apple Store opened in Midtown Manhattan. Its unique glass-cube structure makes it a modern New York City landmark.

(Photo by James Leynse/Corbis via Getty Images)

But at this point, Jobs' health was starting to fade, and observers started to take notice. Note how thin Jobs looks here, shaking hands with Disney CEO Bob Iger at a 2006 Apple event.

(Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Still, 2006 also marked a personal victory for Jobs. He got to send this email to every Apple employee: "Team, it turned out that Michael Dell wasn't perfect at predicting the future. Based on today's stock market close, Apple is worth more than Dell. Stocks go up and down, and things may be different tomorrow, but I thought it was worth a moment of reflection today. Steve."

(Photo via REUTERS/Dino Vournas)

After years of speculation, Jobs would officially unveil the iPhone at January 2007's Macworld Expo. It combined the music features of the iPod with a slick, responsive touch screen that didn't need a stylus, unlike most mobile devices at the time. And the iPhone's Safari was the first full-featured web browser on a phone.

(Photo via REUTERS/Kimberly White)

An excited media dubbed it the "Jesus Phone." Excited fans camped out in front of Apple Stores nationwide.

(Photo by Curtis Means/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)

The iPhone was a massive hit, taking only 74 days from its August 2007 launch to sell a million units.

(Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

In 2008, Apple released the first big iPhone update: the iPhone 3GS. It had faster network speeds, sure, but the biggest change was that it came with this thing called an App Store to let you install software from non-Apple developers. At launch, the App Store had 500 applications.

(Photo via REUTERS/Kimberly White)

Famed venture investor John Doerr of Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers took the stage to announce a $100 million iFund for app developers. It was the start of the app economy, and Apple was leaving Microsoft in the dust.

(Photo by David Paul Morris/Getty Images)

Still, Jobs' health continued to loom over Apple. In August 2008, Bloomberg accidentally published a 2,500 word obituary of Jobs. At a September 2008 keynote, Jobs poked fun at the idea.

(Photo via REUTERS/Robert Galbraith)

In 2009, Tim Cook was tapped as interim CEO while Jobs took the first of three extended medical leaves. Even on Jobs' return, Cook became a regular at Apple keynotes. When Jobs returned, his prognosis was listed as "excellent."

(Photo via REUTERS/Kimberly White)

In 2010, Jobs finally introduced the Apple iPad, the tablet he had been wanting since the early 2000s.

(Photo via REUTERS/Kimberly White)

The iPhone and the iPad accidentally started an internet standards war. Jobs thought Adobe's Flash, then the de facto standard for interactive web content, was slow and insecure. And so Apple's mobile devices didn't support it. A jilted Adobe, recognizing the threat this posed to its business, took out magazine ads begging Apple to reconsider, to no avail.

(Photo Illustration by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

In early 2011, during the last of his medical leaves, Jobs would give his final two product-announcement presentations: one in March for the iPad 2, and one in June for the iCloud service.

(Photo via REUTERS/Beck Diefenbach)

Jobs made his last public appearance in June 2011. He proposed a new Apple Campus to the Cupertino City Council. After years of construction, Apple is planning to move into the "spaceship campus" in early 2017.

(Photo via REUTERS/Noah Berger)

Jobs stepped down as Apple CEO on August 24, 2011, accepting a role as chairman, after his pancreatic cancer relapsed. Not long after, Jobs died on October 5, 2011, working for Apple until the day before his death. That night, the flags at Apple flew at half-mast.

(Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

Tim Cook got the nod as full-time CEO after Jobs' resignation. Apple has continued to grow under Cook, becoming the most valuable company in the world. And the rest, as they say, is history.

(Photo via REUTERS/Stephen Lam)

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