Boeing plans job cuts at South Carolina facility where Trump declared he would 'fight for every last American job'

Some workers at a Boeing facility in South Carolina are being laid off from the company, nearly five months after President Donald Trump visited the plant, The Washington Post reported on Thursday.

"We are going to fight for every last American job," Trump said during a stop at the North Charleston plant in February.

In a statement from Boeing cited by The Post, the company said, "Our competition is relentless, and that has made clear our need as a company to reduce cost to be more competitive. We are offering resources to those affected by layoffs to help them in finding other employment and ease their transition as much as possible."

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Although Boeing declined to state exactly how many people would lose their jobs and when the layoffs would start, affected employees appeared to be coming from a diverse set of departments, including engineering, quality control and training, and operations management, according to The Post.

The latest layoffs coincide with Boeing's announcement in December, when the company announced it would downsize its staff after scaling down this year's production of the Boeing 777 aircraft by 40%, due to lower demand.

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Air Force One, a heavily modified Boeing 747, is seen prior to US President Barack Obama departure from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, December 6, 2016, as he travels to Tampa, Florida, to speak about counterterrorism and visit with troops. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Old airplanes, including Boeing 747-400s, are stored in the desert in Victorville, California March 13, 2015. Last year, there were zero orders placed by commercial airlines for new Boeing 747s or Airbus A380s, reflecting a fundamental shift in the industry toward smaller, twin-engine planes. Smaller planes cost less to fly than the stately, four-engine jumbos, which can carry as many as 525 passengers. Picture taken March 13, 2015. To match Insight AEROSPACE-JUMBO REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Old airplanes, including Boeing 747-400s, are stored in the desert in Victorville, California March 13, 2015. Last year, there were zero orders placed by commercial airlines for new Boeing 747s or Airbus A380s, reflecting a fundamental shift in the industry toward smaller, twin-engine planes. Smaller planes cost less to fly than the stately, four-engine jumbos, which can carry as many as 525 passengers. Picture taken March 13, 2015. To match Insight AEROSPACE-JUMBO REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Boeing 747 also known as a jumbo jet lines up on a runway in preparation for takeoff.
Old airplanes, including British Airways Boeing 747-400s and FedEx planes, are stored in the desert in Victorville, California March 13, 2015. Last year, there were zero orders placed by commercial airlines for new Boeing 747s or Airbus A380s, reflecting a fundamental shift in the industry toward smaller, twin-engine planes. Smaller planes cost less to fly than the stately, four-engine jumbos, which can carry as many as 525 passengers. Picture taken March 13, 2015. To match Insight AEROSPACE-JUMBO REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Old airplanes, including British Airways and Air New Zealand Boeing 747-400s, are stored in the desert in Victorville, California March 13, 2015. Last year, there were zero orders placed by commercial airlines for new Boeing 747s or Airbus A380s, reflecting a fundamental shift in the industry toward smaller, twin-engine planes. Smaller planes cost less to fly than the stately, four-engine jumbos, which can carry as many as 525 passengers. Picture taken March 13, 2015. To match Insight AEROSPACE-JUMBO REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
VLADIVOSTOK, RUSSIA - JUNE 10, 2016: Deicing Rossiya Airlines' Boeing 747-400 EI-XLJ Vladivostok aircraft at a city airport. Rossiya Airlines launched Moscow-Vladivostok-Moscow services on May 31, 2016. Yuri Smityuk/TASS (Photo by Yuri Smityuk\TASS via Getty Images)
Space Shuttle Discovery rides piggyback atop a specially modified Boeing 747 as it departs runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in California on its ferry flight back to Kennedy Space Center in Florida August 19, 2005. Discovery began the return journey to its Florida home port from its landing site in California on Friday after having to land at Edwards Air Force base because of thunderstorms at Cape Canaveral. REUTERS/Tom Rogers TR/HK/KS
The interior of Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal's private Boeing 747 airplane in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Tuesday, April 27, 2010. Alwaleed said he will continue working with Goldman Sachs Group Inc. after the U.S. regulator sued the most profitable securities firm in Wall Street history for misleading its investors. Photographer: Waseem Obaidi/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 18: Interior of the business class section of the life-size display of the new Boeing 747-8 Intercontinental in Renton, Washington, Thursday, Jan. 18, 2007. The plane is a stretched version of the current 747-400 and incorporates interior featured from the 777 and the upcoming 787. (Photo by Kevin P. Casey/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Wide angle view of the modern flight deck of a Boeing 747 aircraft.
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This particular Boeing plant holds some significance to Trump's campaign promise for job growth in the manufacturing industry. It was one of the president's first visits to a company after his inauguration.

"We're here today to celebrate American engineering and American manufacturing," Trump said during his visit on February 17. "We're also here today to celebrate jobs. Jobs!"

Carrier, another company that Trump put the spotlight on during his campaign, was set to layoff around 600 employees starting in July, CNBC reported.

Due in part to Trump's admonishments shortly after the 2016 election, Carrier said it would preserve about 1,069 jobs for 10 years at its Indiana plant in exchange for $7 million in incentives from the government. Trump touted the arrangement in November last year.

"The jobs are still leaving," said Robert James, president of United Steelworkers Local 1999, in CNBC's report. "Nothing has stopped."

"To me this was just political, to make it a victory within Trump's campaign, in his eyes that he did something great," said T.J. Bray, an employee at Carrier. "I'm very grateful that I get to keep my job, and many others, but I'm still disappointed that we're losing a lot."

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SEE ALSO: 600 layoffs coming to Carrier plant Trump claimed to save last year

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